Slavery

John Washington's Civil War: A Slave Narrative

By Crandall Shifflett, editor

Go to catalog

John Washington's recounting of his difficult years as a Virginia slave was made only seven years after his emancipation.

Reserve this title

Historic Churches of Fredericksburg: Houses of the Holy

By Michael Aubrecht

Go to catalog

Recalls stories of rebellion, racism and reconstruction as experienced by Secessionists, Unionists and the African American population in Fredericksburg's landmark churches during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.
Using a wide variety of materials compiled from the local National Park archives, author Michael Aubrecht presents multiple perspectives from local believers and nonbelievers who witnessed the country's "Great Divide." Learn about the importance of faith in old Fredericksburg through the recollections of local clergy such as Reverend Tucker Lacy; excerpts from slave narratives as recorded by Joseph F. Walker; impressions of military commanders such as Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson; and stories of the conflict over African-American membership.
From the publisher's description

Reserve this title

Thomas Jefferson and Slavery

By Sue Willis, CRRL Staff

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Notes on the State of Virginia by Thomas Jefferson.
The only book that Jefferson wrote was undertaken as a matter-of-fact commentary on the resources and institutions of Virginia and developed into one of the more thoughtful books of the time. His cherished goals were the emancipation of slavery in Virginia and the reformation of Virginia's constitution. However, some of the ideas in his Notes are in opposition to these goals, giving creedence to Jefferson's reputation as a conflicted man. It should be noted that the Notes were written in 1781, and Jefferson did try to improve the slaves' lot before his death in 1826.

African-American History of Stafford, Virginia

(This brochure was originally printed in the fall of 2002.)

Colonial Times

Africans first arrived in the Virginia colony in 1619 as indentured servants. In the late 1600s slaves were brought into the sparsely settled Rappahannock Valley, primarily to serve as agricultural laborers.

Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy

By Annette Gordon-Reed

Go to catalog

Annette Gordon-Reed, a professor of law, doesn't take a position for or against the proposition that Sally and Jefferson had a loving relationship. However, Gordon-Reed has strong evidence that they could have had a long relationship.

Reserve this title

The Wolf by the Ears: Thomas Jefferson and Slavery

By John Chester Miller

Go to catalog

Chapters include Slaves and Revolution in Virginia, Racial Inferiority, Blacks and Indians, Jefferson as a Slavemaster, and Sally Hemings.

Reserve this title

Mr. Jefferson's Lost Cause: Land, Farmers, Slavery and the Louisiana Purchase

By Roger Kennedy

Go to catalog

Jefferson's dream of filling the land he purchased with independent farmers was not to be realized. Much of the land would be worked by slaves, solidifying the institution's hold on the new nation. Kennedy, Director Emeritus of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, has also used interesting yet obscure historical characters to add depth to his story.

Reserve this title

The Jefferson Scandals: A Rebuttal

By Virginius Dabney

Go to catalog

A book that argues against Thomas Jefferson's relationship with Sally Hemings.

Reserve this title

Landon Carter's Uneasy Kingdom: Revolution and Rebellion on a Virginia Plantation

By Rhys Isaac

Go to catalog

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the tale of the Rappahannock River plantation owner with excerpts from his diaries. The incongruity of Carter's support of the American Revolution and the rebellious attitudes of his own slaves makes for thought-provoking reading.

Reserve this title