Civil War - U.S.

The Civil War 150: An Essential To-Do List for the 150th Anniversary

By Civil War Trust

Go to catalog

The director of history and education for the Civil War Trust designed this book for people who are curious about the Civil War and want to have and share experiences that encompass that historical period. They range from those simple things that are not location-specific (Don a uniform or period dress, Go to a Civil War Round Table meeting) to actually going to those places, well-known and otherwise, where history was made. Good for those who enjoy check-lists.

Reserve this title

Virginians at War: The Civil War Experiences of Seven Young Confederates

By John G. Selby

Go to catalog

A different tack to Civil War studies--here John Shelby sketches particular instances of the conflict and marries those with first-hand accounts from seven young Confederates who were involved. Three women's and four men's lives are interwoven the events surrounding them, and they are followed even well into the war's aftermath.

Reserve this title

A Pocket History of the Civil War

By Martin F. Graham

Go to catalog

This is a small book. It lacks gorgeous illustrations, but it -is- concise, plainly-written and published by one of the most recognized companies for military history for the National Civil War Museum. If a reader wants a compact overview, complete with "Test Your Knowledge" sections for each chapter, the pocket history is the way to go. Includes a glossary.

Reserve this title

Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville: The Dare Mark Campaign

By Daniel E. Sutherland

Go to catalog

Even the most massive battle is only part of a larger campaign. From the winter of 1862 through 1863, the Confederacy experienced major victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, showing up the Union's weaknesses in strategy and preparation. As to the title, a Confederate soldier referred to the Rappahannock River as "the Dare Mark" as it was a strategic point that must be controlled, and the campaign described here reflects that conflict.
This book is part of the Great Campaigns of the Civil War series.

Reserve this title

General Jo Shelby's March

By Anthony Arthur

Go to catalog

Some Confederate officers and soldiers refused to live in a conquered land. General Jo Shelby was one of those. He led his 300 men, the "Iron Brigade," on a twelve-hundred-mile march to Mexico where they supported the Emperor Maximilian in his fight against Juarez's rebels, hoping to eventually establish their own government there. Though doomed, his actions were historically notable--all the more so since in his later years, he returned to the United States, renounced slavery, became U.S. Marshall for western Missouri and became famous as a nineteenth-century progressive.

Reserve this title

The Battle of Antietam: The Bloodiest Day

By Ted Alexander

Go to catalog

"The worst hit was the 30th Virginia. This was a unit composed of shopkeepers, clerks, skilled craftsmen and farmers from the Fredericksburg area. They went into the fight with 236 men and lost 172, killed, wounded and captured, 68 percent of the regiment." (p. 84)

In a single day, 23,000 men died, were captured or were wounded at the Battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, on September 17, 1862. The Chief Historian for the Antietam site gives a fascinating look at the men and battlefield movements that went into that very long and very bloody day. He also includes sections on hospital conditions and how the battle was remembered in the decades following.
Part of the History Press' Civil War sesquicentennial series.

Reserve this title

The Battle of Brandy Station: North America's Largest Cavalry Battle

By Eric J. Wittenberg

Go to catalog

On June 9, 1863, in the aftermath of the Battle of Chancellorsville, Union soldiers ambushed sleeping Confederates on the banks of the Rappahannock, beginning the largest cavalry battle ever fought on American soil. With enough unusual and personal detail to make it very readable, this volume includes clear maps, photographs, and a GPS guided tour of the battlefield.
Part of the History Press' Civil War Sesquicentennial Series.

Reserve this title

Private Fleming at Chancellorsville: The Red Badge of Courage and the Civil War

By Perry Lentz

Go to catalog

Historian Perry Lentz reveals the link between the classic novel, The Red Badge of Courage, and the reality of the Battle of Chancellorsville. To illustrate, he takes the well-documented experiences of Private Henry Fleming of the 304th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment and his fellows to show how the novel reflected and expanded on the soldiers' reality.

Reserve this title

Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War, by Andrew F. Smith

Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War, by Andrew F. Smith

It’s been said an army travels on its stomach, and though many of the starving Confederate troops at the war’s end were still willing to fight, ultimately it was a physically broken army returning to their devastated, burned out farms that sounded the death knell of the nascent nation, so contends gastronomical historian Andrew F. Smith in his recent book, Starving the South.

The Smoothbore Volley That Doomed the Confederacy, Chapter 1, by Robert K. Krick

The Smoothbore Volley That Doomed the Confederacy, Chapter 1, by Robert K. Krick

The first eighteen pages of The Smoothbore Volley That Doomed the Confederacy, by Robert K. Krick, are reprinted here with permission from the author and publisher, Louisiana State University Press, which retains all republication rights. Library copies of The Smoothbore Volley are available for check-out.

Nineteen men in two distinct groups rode forward from the coalescing Confederate lines west of Chancellorsville at about 9:00 P.M. on May 2, 1863. Only seven of the nineteen came back untouched, man or horse. Although one of those nearest the offending musket muzzles, Major General A. P. Hill escaped among the unscathed handful. Lieutenant General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, among those farthest from the flash point, was one of the five men killed or mortally wounded. The capricious paths of a few dozen one-ounce lead balls caroming off the dense shrubbery of Spotsylvania’s Wilderness that night had much to do with the course of the Civil War.

From every imaginable perspective, the afternoon of May 2 had been a stunning Confederate success of unprecedented magnitude. Lee and Jackson had crafted between them a dazzling tactical initiative that sent Stonewall covertly all the way across the front of a Federal army that outnumbered the southerners by more than two to one. The redoubtable corps commander managed the remarkable march without serious interruption, arrayed his first two divisions in a wide line, and descended upon the Federals like a thunderbolt. Those northerners who rallied bravely against the tide faced an inexorable outflanking by the outriders of Jackson’s line, who stretched far beyond the center of the attack in both directions. In this fashion Jackson routed one Union corps, trapped another out of the line, and left the others shaky, uncertain, and vulnerable to be stampeded.