Women

Brabbling Women: Disorderly Speech and the Law in Early Virginia

By Terri L. Snyder

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Outspoken Virginia women left their mark in the proceedings of the colonial courts.  Author Terri Snyder exhumes and examines the circumstances surrounding some cases that touched on women's issues.

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Good Wives, Nasty Wenches & Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia

By Kathleen M. Brown

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A feminist examination of the roles of women of different classes--lower class white, upper class white, slave, and Indian--in colonial Virginia, with much reliance on primary sources.

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Colonial Virginia Cookery

By Jane Carson

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Cooking methods and recipes as done by Virginia's colonists. Recipes are drawn from period cookbooks by Mrs. Custis, Mrs. Randolph, Mrs. Glasse, and numerous others. Dressing trout, stewing oysters, making ice cream, dressing mutton, and layering trifles were part and parcel of colonial cooking.
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The Lee Girls

By Mary P. Coulling

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Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Randolph Custis Lee lived at Arlington House while he worked at the War Office in Washington. During the 1830s and 1840s, they had seven children, four of whom were girls. This book tells of the lives of Mary, Anne, Agnes, and Mildred, none of whom married, two of whom died young, and all of whom were known as "the Lee girls."

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The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book

By Anne Carter Zimmer

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"With recipes for breads, cakes, puddings, sweets, soups, main dishes, vegetables, drinks, and home remedies, The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book will serve as a ready reference on traditional American cookery. For each entry, the author provides the original recipe, helpful notes on the ingredients and techniques employed, and instructions--based on careful kitchen testing--for adapting the recipe in the modern kitchen. Peppered throughout with family stories and illustrated with photographs from the Lee family and other archives, the book is both an informative investigation of southern foodways and a fascinating look at one family's household history."
(From the publisher's description)

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Pocahontas, Powhatan, Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown

By Helen C. Rountree

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"Despite their roles as senior politicians in these watershed events, no biography of either Powhatan or Opechancanough exists. And while there are other "biographies" of Pocahontas, they have for the most part elaborated on her legend more than they have addressed the known facts of her remarkable life. As the 400th anniversary of Jamestown's founding approaches, nationally renowned scholar of Native Americans, Helen Rountree, provides in a single book the definitive biographies of these three important figures. In their lives we see the whole arc of Indian experience with the English settlers -- from the wary initial encounters presided over by Powhatan, to the uneasy diplomacy characterized by the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, to the warfare and eventual loss of native sovereignty that came during Opechancanough's reign."
(From the publisher's description)

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Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: An American Portrait

By Camilla Townsend

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"...differs from all previous biographies of Pocahontas in capturing how similar seventeenth-century Native Americans were-in the way they saw, understood, and struggled to control their world-not only to the invading English, but also to ourselves.Neither naive nor innocent, Indians like Pocahontas and her father, the powerful king Powhatan, confronted the vast might of the English with sophistication, diplomacy, and violence. Indeed, Pocahontas's life is a testament to the subtle intelligence that Native Americans, always aware of their material disadvantages, brought to bear against the military power of the colonizing English."
(From the publisher's description)

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Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Heart of a New Nation

By David A. Price

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A gripping narrative of one of the great survival stories of American history: the opening of the first permanent English settlement in the New World. Drawing on period letters and chronicles, and on the papers of the Virginia Company–which financed the settlement of Jamestown–David Price tells a tale of cowardice and courage, stupidity and brilliance, tragedy and costly triumph. He takes us into the day-to-day existence of the English men and women whose charge was to find gold and a route to the Orient, and who found, instead, hardship and wretched misery. Death, in fact, became the settlers’ most faithful companion, and their infighting was ceaseless.

Price offers a rare balanced view of the relationship between the settlers and the natives. He unravels the crucial role of Pocahontas, a young woman whose reality has been obscured by centuries of legend and misinformation (and, more recently, animation). He paints indelible portraits of Chief Powhatan, the aged monarch who came close to ending the colony’s existence, and Captain John Smith, the former mercenary and slave, whose disdain for class distinctions infuriated many around him–even as his resourcefulness made him essential to the colony’s success.
(From the publisher's description)

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Sinners, Saints and Soldiers in Civil War Stafford

By Jane Hollenbeck Conner

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Over 135,000 Union soldiers came to Stafford during the Civil War. This book relates the stories of six unique individuals who visited the area. The writings of these soldiers, nurses, and civilians help paint a picture of what Stafford and Fredericksburg were like during this devastating war.
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Coffee Houses: A Tradition Dating to Colonial Times

With steaming cups in hand, today's Fredericksburg area coffee shops continue a tradition which dates back three centuries to the founding of the town.

Walk in gentlemen, rest at your ease,
Pay for what you call for, and call for what you please.

This verse hung over the doorway of The Coffee House in old Fredericksburg. Located in the first Market House/Town Hall on Caroline Street near William, it was here that 18th- and 19th-century Fredericksburgers sipped their favorite brew and pondered questions from the political to the classical.