World War II

The Hidden Pope: The Untold Story of a Lifelong Friendship That Is Changing the Relationship Between Catholics and Jews: The Personal Journey of John Paul II and Jerzy Kluger

By Darcy O'Brien

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"Darcy O'Brien offers the account of the extraordinary relationship of Karol Wojtyla and Jerzy Kluger - their boyhood in the small Polish town of Wadowice, their separation at the beginning of World War II, their individual experiences under Nazi and Soviet tyranny, and their reunion almost thirty years later that deepened their friendship and made a profound impact on the history of our time. Set in the perspective of monumental reconciliation between Christianity and Judaism, this is a portrait of John Paul II that describes him as only his closest friends know him and as no pope has ever been portrayed before. Readers will come to know the Holy Father as a man and to understand his most controversial ideas as expressions of his dramatic experience of life."

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The Inextinguishable Symphony: A True Story of Music and Love in Nazi Germany

By Martin Goldsmith

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"Set amid the growing tyranny of Germany's Third Reich, here is the riveting and emotional tale of Gunther Goldschmidt and Rosemarie Gumpert, two courageous Jewish musicians who struggled to perform under unimaginable circumstances--and found themselves falling in love in a country bent on destroying them."

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Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue

By Kathryn J. Atwood

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These twenty-six suspense-filled stories unfold from across Germany, Poland, Great Britain, the United States, and more, providing an inspiring reminder of women and girls' refusal to sit on the sidelines around the world and throughout history.

Sophie Scholl : the White Rose -- Maria von Maltzan : the countess who hid Jews -- Irene Gut : "only a young girl" -- Irena Sendler : life in a jar -- Stefania Podgorska : the teen who hid thirteen -- Marie-Madeleine Fourcade : "only a woman" -- Andrée Virot : Agent Rose -- Josephine Baker : spy singer -- Magda Trocmé : wife, mother, teacher, rescuer -- Diet Eman : courier for the Dutch resistance -- Hannie Schaft : the symbol of the resistance -- Johtje Vos : a group effort -- Corrie ten Boom : watchmaker, rescuer, reconciler -- Andrée de Jongh : the comet line -- Hortense Daman : partisan courier -- Fernande Keufgens : the teen with the bold voice -- Monica Wichfeld : heroine of the Danish resistance -- Ebba Lund : the girl with the red cap -- Noor Inayat Khan : royal spy -- Nancy Wake : the white mouse -- Pearl Witherington : the courier who became a leader -- Virginia Hall : the greatest American spy -- Muriel Phillips : U.S. Army nurse -- Marlene Dietrich : "the only important thing" -- Maria Gulovich : Slovak for the OSS -- Martha Gellhorn : war correspondent.

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The Women Who Wrote the War

By Nancy Caldwell Sorel

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Celebrates the accomplishments of World War II's female war correspondents, who risked their lives in combat zones to provide firsthand reports on the events of the war.

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In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin by Erik Larson

In the Garden of Beasts

It's 1933 and President Roosevelt is having a devil of a time finding someone to appoint to the post of ambassador to Germany in Erik Larson’s In the Garden of Beasts. All of the usual picks politely decline the post, as news of Germany’s foreboding political atmosphere drifts to America. Roosevelt eventually settles on William E. Dodd, a historian at the University of Chicago whose primary goal is to finish his multi-volume historical treatise on the antebellum South before he dies. By most accounts, Dodd is an odd pick for ambassador, being neither rich nor well-connected. Most ambassadors entertain lavishly during their appointments, and it is expected that the costs will come from their own coffers. Frugal Dodd immediately made waves by pledging to live solely on his meager income, almost unheard of in cosmopolitan Berlin.

Dodd naively sees the appointment as a respite from the trials of University department chairmanship and a boon of time to work on his project. He, like most Americans, is grossly uninformed about the political machinations happening in Germany, as Hitler, Göring, and Goebbels vie for power and German Jews are increasingly menaced. The entire Dodd family decides to come along to Berlin, ready for a new lark: the professor and his wife, Mattie, their son, William Jr., and their beautiful, flirtatious, 24-year-old daughter, Martha (who happens to also be fleeing the wreckage of a precipitous marriage to a banker).

Between Silk and Cyanide: A Codemaker's War, 1941-45

By Leo Marks

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"In 1942, with a black-market chicken tucked under his arm by his mother, Leo Marks left his father's famous bookshop, 84 Charing Cross Road, and went off to fight the war. He was twenty-two. Soon recognized as a cryptographer of genius, he became head of communications at the Special Operations Executive (SOE), where he revolutionized the codemaking techniques of the Allies and trained some of the most famous agents dropped into occupied Europe."

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The King's Speech

By Mark Logue and Peter Conradi

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Albert, Duke of York began to see speech therapist Lionel Logue in a desperate bid to cure his lifelong stammer. Little did the two men know that this unlikely friendship would ultimately save the House of Windsor from collapse. The amiable Logue gave the shy young Duke the skills and the confidence to stand and deliver before a crowd. And when his elder brother, Edward VIII, abdicated the throne to marry for love, 'Bertie' was able to assume the reins of power as King George VI.

The Oscar-winning movie of the same title is available on DVD, and the book is also available on audio.

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Beatrice Schenk de Regniers Danced with Words and Pictures

May I Bring a Friend by Beatrice de Regniers

"I think of writing--particularly of writing picture books--as a kind of choreography. A picture book must have pace and movement and pattern. Pictures and text should, together, create the pattern, rather than simply run parallel." --  Beatrice Schenk de Regniers*

Quick Facts:

Born:  in Lafayette, Indiana, on August 16, 1914
Favorite writing genres: picture books, folk tales, poetry, and plays
Well-known books: May I Bring a Friend?; What Can You Do with a Shoe?;  Everyone Is Good for Something;  David and GoliathIt Does Not Say Meow, and Other Animal RhymesLittle Sister and the Month Brothers
Her last name is pronounced, “drain-yay”
Education: Attended University of Illinois, 1931-33; University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1935, graduate study, 1936-37; Winnetka Graduate Teachers College, M.Ed., 1941.
Career:  Member of the Eloise Moore Dance Group, Chicago, 1942-43; copywriter, Scott Foresman, publishers, Chicago, 1943-44; welfare officer, UNRRA, Egypt, 1944-46; copywriter, American Book Company, New York, 1948-49; director of educational materials, American Heart Association, New York, 1949-61; editor, Lucky Book Club, Scholastic Book Services, New York, 1961-81.
Awards:  May Children's Spring Book Festival honor book, New York Herald Tribune, 1958, for Cats Cats Cats Cats Cats;  Boys' Clubs Junior Book Award, 1960, for The Snow Party;  Indiana Authors Day Award, honorable mention, 1961, for The Shadow Book;  Caldecott Award, 1965, for May I Bring a Friend? ‘s illustrations by Beni Montresor; certificate of excellence, American Institute of Graphic Arts, for communicating with children;  Brooklyn Art Books for Children citation, 1973, for Red Riding Hood: Retold in Verse for Boys and Girls to Read Themselves.
Memberships: Authors Guild, Authors League of America, Dramatists Guild, PEN, Society of Children's Book Writers.
Died:  March 1, 2000, from a stroke at her home in Washington, D.C.

 

Soldiers of Freedom: An Illustrated History of African Americans in the Armed Forces

By Kai Wright

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Blacks have shouldered arms in defense of the U.S. since the Revolutionary War. This book portrays the military as the front line of the nation's race war as blacks, ambivalent about being simultaneously rebuffed and desperately encouraged to serve, risked their lives.

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