first-hand accounts

Civil War Medicine: Care and Comfort of the Wounded

By Robert E. Denney

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First-hand accounts from letters, journals, reports, and diaries from both sides of the conflict tell the story of the struggle to treat the wounded in the Civil War. Items are arranged chronologically from January 1862 to October 1865. Includes black and white photos.

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Living Through the Civil Rights Movement

By Charles George, book editor

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Responding to the school integration crisis in Little Rock / Dwight D. Eisenhower -- The nation faces a moral crisis in regard to race / John F. Kennedy -- The Civil Rights Movement threatens individual and states rights / George C. Wallace -- Blacks must have the right to vote / Lyndon B. Johnson -- "I have a dream" / Dr. Martin Luther King Jr -- Blacks must do whatever is necessary to secure their rights / Malcolm X -- Blacks must develop their own community / Stokely Carmichael -- Confronting racism at Little Rock's Central High School / Daisy Bates -- Black students take a stand : sit-ins and freedom rides / Diane Nash -- Attempting to vote in Mississippi / Fannie Lou Hamer -- Marching in Birmingham's Children's Crusade / Audrey Faye Hendricks, Judy Tarver, Bernita Roberson, and Larry Russell -- Bloody Sunday : the protest march that shocked the nation / John Lewis.

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The Seventeenth Child

By Dorothy Marie Rice & Lucille Mabel Walthall Payne

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The oral history of the seventeenth child of black sharecroppers, describing her life in Virginia and New Jersey during the Depression.

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Pvt. Hubert Wesselman, United States Army, American Expeditionary Force, 1918

“I was reading a book at the time and at 10.59 the guns all quit at once. It was to [sp] good to be true. I didn’t cheer as I cheered myself hoarse while at Souilly and it was a false report so I didn’t want to do it again. It wasn’t long till the Co came back. They were turned back just as they came under shell fire. One of K Co men got a shrapnel in the arm at the last minute. The boys looked more like gohsts [sp] than human when they came in, for want of rest and grub but that night we all sure put away some sleep."

Sinners, Saints and Soldiers in Civil War Stafford

By Jane Hollenbeck Conner

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Over 135,000 Union soldiers came to Stafford during the Civil War. This book relates the stories of six unique individuals who visited the area. The writings of these soldiers, nurses, and civilians help paint a picture of what Stafford and Fredericksburg were like during this devastating war.
From the publisher's description

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John Washington's Civil War: A Slave Narrative

By Crandall Shifflett, editor

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John Washington's recounting of his difficult years as a Virginia slave was made only seven years after his emancipation.

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Live Strong: Inspirational Stories from Cancer Survivors--From Diagnosis to Treatment and Beyond

By The Lance Armstrong Foundation

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"My work with the LAF shows me daily that sharing our stories and learning from one another’s experiences helps us cancer survivors continue to survive. Some people think the cancer experience is only about the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as if after the disease goes into remission, it no longer exists. But survivorship goes beyond remission. Survivorship is an evolution."
From the Introduction by Lance Armstrong

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The Day is Ours! An Inside View of the Battles of Trenton and Princeton, November 1776 - January 1777

By William M. Dwyer

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A wonderful account based on the actual words and writings of the men who lived through those famed battles.

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"The old wines of the good people of Fredericksburg have been referred to."

By General G. Moxley Sorrel

In the aftermath of December 1862's bloody Battle of Fredericksburg, in the midst of the tending of the wounded and removal of the dead, there were some surprising flashes of cordiality between the enemy camps. General G. Moxley Sorrel, Longstreet's Chief of Staff, gives a very human side to the war in his recollections.

The old wines of the good people of Fredericksburg have been referred to. They suffered in the fortunes of war. A few nights before the opening of the battle, which was then imminent, considerable quantities of fine old Madeira and other varieties were taken out of cellars and bins, and sent by the citizens to our fellows in camp, equally ready for drink or for battle. It was known that the town would be shelled and occupied by the Federals, probably looted and plundered; therefore it was thought safest to see priceless old vintages passed around campfires and quaffed in gulps from tincups. Of course the men would have better liked whiskey, but they did not refuse the wine.