History Books

The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book

By Anne Carter Zimmer

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"With recipes for breads, cakes, puddings, sweets, soups, main dishes, vegetables, drinks, and home remedies, The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book will serve as a ready reference on traditional American cookery. For each entry, the author provides the original recipe, helpful notes on the ingredients and techniques employed, and instructions--based on careful kitchen testing--for adapting the recipe in the modern kitchen. Peppered throughout with family stories and illustrated with photographs from the Lee family and other archives, the book is both an informative investigation of southern foodways and a fascinating look at one family's household history."
(From the publisher's description)

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Irons in the Fire: The Business History of the Tayloe Family and Virginia's Gentry, 1700-1860

By Laura Croghan Kamoie

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Irons in the Fire chronicles the agricultural, industrial, and commercial activities of four generations of the Tayloe family of Northern Virginia, revealing a greater complexity in the southern business culture of early America than scholars have generally recognized. Through the story of one representative family, Laura Croghan Kamoie illustrates how entrepreneurship and a broadly skilled slave-labor force combined to create economic diversification well before the American Revolution. Contrary to general historical perceptions, southern elite planters were, at least until the 1790s, very like their northern counterparts.
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Speaking of the Northern Neck of Virginia & Life in Its Long-Untrodden Ways During Three and a Half Centuries

By C. Jackson Simmons

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This is a compilation of speeches by a noted Northern Neck historian, augmented by many illustrations. The subjects include the Northern Neck's early settlement, speech patterns of the gentry and others, the "villaines" Moll Flanders and Henry Esmond, crime & punishments generally, a colonial church,
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A History of Our Own: Stafford County, Virginia

By Albert Z. Conner, Jr.

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Mr. Conner's book gives Stafford County its own place in American history, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. Filled with photographs and illustrations, this handsome book gives an excellent overview of the county's development and includes noteworthy individuals and events that impacted the area.
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Growing Up in the 1850s: The Journal of Agnes Lee

By Agnes Lee, edited and with a foreward by Mary Custis Lee deButts

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Robert E. Lee's young daughter kept a journal from the time she was twelve to the time she was seventeen. Agnes tells of her days at West Point where her father taught as well as time spent at the Female Institute in Staunton. Also mentioned are the death of her beloved grandparents and teaching slave children to read in preparation for their emancipation.
The second part consists of the recollections of Mildred, another Lee daughter, and family letters.
Includes an index.
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Empires in the Forest: Jamestown and the Beginning of America

By Avery Chenoweth ; photographs, Robert Llewellyn

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"This beautiful work of photography and prose traces the ways in which American culture grew out of the conflict that characterized the first contact between Native Americans and Europeans."
(From the publisher's description)

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Before and After Jamestown: Virginia's Powhatans and Their Predecessors

By Helen C. Rountree and E. Randolph Turner III

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Addressed to specialists and nonspecialists alike, Before and After Jamestown introduces the Powhatans--the Native Americans of Virginia's coastal plains who played an integral part in the life of the Williamsburg and Jamestown settlements--in scenes that span 1,100 years, from just before their earliest contact with non-Indians to the present day.

This first comprehensive overview of the Powhatans emphasizes how the Powhatan jigsaw has been pieced together with bits of evidence from archaeology, history, and cultural anthropology. Synthesizing a wealth of documentary and archaeological data, the authors have produced a book at once thoroughly grounded in scholarship and accessible to the general reader. Recognized authorities in Powhatan archaeology and ethnography, they have also extended the historical account through the native people's long-term adaptation to European immigrants and into the immediate present and their continuing efforts to gain greater recognition as Indians.
(From the publisher's description)

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Pocahontas, Powhatan, Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown

By Helen C. Rountree

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"Despite their roles as senior politicians in these watershed events, no biography of either Powhatan or Opechancanough exists. And while there are other "biographies" of Pocahontas, they have for the most part elaborated on her legend more than they have addressed the known facts of her remarkable life. As the 400th anniversary of Jamestown's founding approaches, nationally renowned scholar of Native Americans, Helen Rountree, provides in a single book the definitive biographies of these three important figures. In their lives we see the whole arc of Indian experience with the English settlers -- from the wary initial encounters presided over by Powhatan, to the uneasy diplomacy characterized by the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, to the warfare and eventual loss of native sovereignty that came during Opechancanough's reign."
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Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: An American Portrait

By Camilla Townsend

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"...differs from all previous biographies of Pocahontas in capturing how similar seventeenth-century Native Americans were-in the way they saw, understood, and struggled to control their world-not only to the invading English, but also to ourselves.Neither naive nor innocent, Indians like Pocahontas and her father, the powerful king Powhatan, confronted the vast might of the English with sophistication, diplomacy, and violence. Indeed, Pocahontas's life is a testament to the subtle intelligence that Native Americans, always aware of their material disadvantages, brought to bear against the military power of the colonizing English."
(From the publisher's description)

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Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Heart of a New Nation

By David A. Price

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A gripping narrative of one of the great survival stories of American history: the opening of the first permanent English settlement in the New World. Drawing on period letters and chronicles, and on the papers of the Virginia Company–which financed the settlement of Jamestown–David Price tells a tale of cowardice and courage, stupidity and brilliance, tragedy and costly triumph. He takes us into the day-to-day existence of the English men and women whose charge was to find gold and a route to the Orient, and who found, instead, hardship and wretched misery. Death, in fact, became the settlers’ most faithful companion, and their infighting was ceaseless.

Price offers a rare balanced view of the relationship between the settlers and the natives. He unravels the crucial role of Pocahontas, a young woman whose reality has been obscured by centuries of legend and misinformation (and, more recently, animation). He paints indelible portraits of Chief Powhatan, the aged monarch who came close to ending the colony’s existence, and Captain John Smith, the former mercenary and slave, whose disdain for class distinctions infuriated many around him–even as his resourcefulness made him essential to the colony’s success.
(From the publisher's description)

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