History Books

Brady's Civil War

By Webb Garrison

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This is a collection of Civil War images photographed by Mathew Brady and his assistants. On page 79, view the destruction on the Fredericksburg battlefield caused by a single projectile fired by gunners of the 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. Pages 152 and 153 show federal engineers rebuilding the town's infrastructure. Although the caption states that the rail track near the Potomac is being repaired, the photograph clearly refers to the Rappahannock. The photograph on page 232 shows the remains of the Phillips house that had been seized by General Burnside during his assault on the town. Look on page 251 for the last Fredericksburg photograph that Brady took. He used a telescopic lens and climbed to the top of a railroad bridge to make this photo of a group of men under the command of Robert E. Lee.

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Ironclad: The Epic Battle, Calamitous Loss, and Historic Recovery of the USS Monitor

By Paul R. Clancy

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"A cheesebox on a shingle," scoffed one observer as the USS Monitor steamed slowly toward the Confederacy's hulking iron battleship in March 1862. But the odd-looking contraption with its revolving gun turret revolutionized naval warfare.Its one great battle in the spring of 1862 marked the obsolescence of wooden fighting ships and may have saved the Union. Its terrible end in a winter storm off Cape Hatteras condemned sixteen sailors to a watery grave. And the recovery of its 200-ton turret in August 2002 capped the largest, most complex and hazardous ocean salvage operation in history.
(From the publisher's description)

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Reign of Iron: The Story of the First Battling Ironclads, the Monitor and the Merrimack

By James L. Nelson

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The first ironclad ships to fight each other, the Monitor and the Virginia (Merrimack), were the unique products of American design genius and ingenuity, North and South. In one afternoon, in a battle that lasted four hours, they ended the three-thousand-year tradition of wooden men-of-war and ushered in, as Admiral John A. Dahlgren called it, "the reign of iron."In this absorbing history, novelist, historian, and tall-ship sailor James L. Nelson, through in-depth research and a storyteller's voice, brilliantly recounts the story of these magnificent ships, the men who built and fought them, and the extraordinary battle that made them legend.
(Publisher's description)

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Duel of the Ironclads: The Monitor vs. the Virginia

By Patrick O'Brien

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A short book (36 pages) that is appropriate for elementary students who are just beginning to develop a taste for history.

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Duel Between the First Ironclads

By William C. Davis

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The author weaves fascinating personal and historical detail into his narrative.
Also available as an eBook.

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C.S.S. Virginia: Mistress of Hampton Roads

By John V. Quarstein

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A lengthy account of the naval battle. Available to read in the Virginiana Room.
Part of the Virginia Regimental Histories series.

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Battle of the Ironclads: The Monitor and the Merrimack

By Alden R. Carter

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This book for elementary school students examines the construction, battles, and technological and historical impact of the Civil War battleships, the Monitor and the Virginia (Merrimack).

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Old-house Dictionary: An Illustrated Guide to American Domestic Architecture (1600-1940)

By Steven J. Phillips

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"From a one-room cabin to a beaux-arts mansion, here is a concise and easily understandable architectural dictionary. Contains more than 450 illustrations, 1,500 terms, 750 definitions and 17 useful cross-references for anyone interested in American domestic architecture."

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Old House, New House: A Child's Exploration of American Architectural Styles

By Michael Gaughenbaug and Herbert Camburn

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"As a family restores the large old house they have bought, they learn about its history and special features and about other types of houses, from San Francisco Victorians to Midwest farmhouses to New York brownstones."
A charming way to introduce children to architectural history.

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Home Building and Woodworking in Colonial America

By C. Keith Wilbur

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Tells how different styles of colonial buildings were constructed using hewn logs, hand tools, and wooden pegs. Many detailed illustrations of tools and methods of construction

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