Virginia Johnson

The Bedlam Detective by Stephen Gallagher

The Bedlam Detective by Stephen Gallagher

What really happened when genius businessman Sir Owain Lancaster decided he could conquer the Amazon? In the 1800s, it was not so unusual for British gentlemen to take on this kind of task—to prove the superiority of man over the elements and increase our scientific knowledge. In Sir Owain’s case, the natural elements won. Or, perhaps they were horrifically supernatural, as Sir Owain claims. Stephen Gallagher’s Bedlam Detective is determined to find out the truth.

Hands-on Colonial Crafts

Chances are if you are studying colonial times, your teacher will assign a hands-on project. You could make a model of the Jamestown Fort or a copy of the Declaration of Independence-but why not try a craft that the colonists themselves would have done?

Every colonial family except for the very rich had to be able to make their own soap, candles, furniture, cloth, baskets, toys, and musical instruments. Below is one practical craft to try. Scroll down and check our lists of books and Web sites for more ideas.

Moon Handbook: Virginia, Including Washington DC by Michaela Gaaserud

Moon Handbook: Virginia, Including Washington DC

Whether you’re a newcomer or a born-here, fall weekends are the perfect time to explore this beautiful, charming state. Short road trips can take you from the mountains to the beach and lots of points in between. Grab Michaela Gaaserud’s Moon Handbook for Virginia, Including Washington DC to find the perfect destination for you.

Make Your Own Board Games

Gather your family together for an hour or two of face-to-face gaming with a twist: you can make the games yourselves to match your family's interests.

The Homeschool Phenomenon

Not every child today learns in a big building with lots of other students all studying the same things at the same time. In the past twenty years, the homeschool phenomenon has caught fire across America.

Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces by Marisa McClellan

Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces by Marisa McClel

Glorious fruit and vegetables are a hallmark of harvests, but what do you do when you want to preserve the tastes for other times? Traditionally, the answer was to “put up” or preserve these wonderful things for later, sometimes combining them creatively and adding spices. A day of canning meant piles of produce, dozens of jars, and steam filling the kitchen for hours—usually on a hot summer day. Marisa McClellan’s Preserving by the Pint presents a different way to do this wonderful, traditional cooking without such a huge commitment of time and storage space.

Author of the Month: Betsy Byars

No teacher ever told Newbery-winning author Betsy Byars she should be a writer when she was growing up. Young Betsy Cromer, nicknamed “Cro,” was a wide-awake kid and into most everything, but not writing. Part of the time her family lived in the country, which was heaven for Betsy as she was surrounded by nature. When she got older, she was interested in nature of a different kind—boys!

Baking Cakes in Kigali by Gaile Parkin

Baking Cakes in Kigali by Gaile Parkin

In a country that is trying to piece itself back together after a terrible civil war, baking cakes might not seem to be such an important thing to do. But these are not just any cakes, and Angel Tungaraza is not just any baker. Her cakes are meant for joy and celebration. Angel’s kitchen is a place where secrets are shared and hearts often reconciled in Gaile Parkin’s novel, Baking Cakes in Kigali.

Riptide by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

Riptide by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

First will ye Lie
Curst shall ye Crye
Worst must ye Die

They should have heeded the warning on the guard stone. But, no, through the years many people couldn’t resist the lure of riches though many died in trying to recover them. For in 1695, English pirate Edward Ockham had commanded his men bury his silver, gold, and jewels on an island off the coast of Maine. He didn’t just bury it deep in a simple hole in the ground. The pirate had his many thousand pounds of loot safely placed in a devious trap called the Water Shaft as is recounted in Riptide, by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child.

Help for the Haunted by John Searles

Help for the Haunted by John Searles

Sylvie and her sister live far away from everybody else in an abandoned subdivision. Sylvie kind of likes it that way because of the gossip. There was even gossip before their parents were murdered, especially after the book came out about their ghost-busting ways. The stuff they kept in the basement. The exorcisms. The tell-all Help for the Haunted was full of way-too-personal details.