Virginia Johnson

07/21/2016 - 10:59am

The arts of food preservation go back to civilization's beginnings. In ancient Mesopotamia, families saved their produce for lean times. They dried dates, apples and figs. Their meat might be smoked, dried, or salted meat. Softer fruits could be preserved in honey. Now we have cane sugar, pressure cookers, refrigeration, packaged pectin, and so much more to make the process easier. Preserves and pickles have gone gourmet and exotic with exciting flavor combinations to enjoy and share with others.

09/12/2016 - 12:50pm

Did you know?

 — She's known as Jo to her friends. No one's called her Joanne since she was a child, and only then if she was being naughty.

 — Rowling is pronounced "rolling."

 — Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone was first published in England as Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.

 — Hermoine IS based on a real person — J.K. Rowling!

 — The fantastic Ford Anglia featured in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is similar to one owned by Sean Harris, her best friend at Wyedean School.

07/16/2016 - 1:41pm
A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe

What would really happen if thousands of people died in a city every day from an illness? Even worse, a city with few to no hospitals and only a bare bones emergency infrastructure? When the illness might leave no mark on a person until he or she fell over dead in front of you? And that’s when you realize, you have been exposed and could be next. What would you do?

07/06/2016 - 12:45pm
Stylistic Architecture in Fredericksburg

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

America's Forgotten Architecture by Tony P. Wrenn and Elizabeth D. Mulloy.
This book teaches how to look for architectural beauty in old buildings which may have been forgotten and whose loveliness deserves to be preserved. It features crisp black and white photos from across America. The authors explain early architectural styles and define preservation terms. Wonderful for browsing.
09/12/2016 - 8:43am

With Google's now infamous detailed photos, it's rather easy to see how a town is laid out today. But what about 50, 100, or 150 years ago? Where are the maps that show how the towns and counties grew through the years? One excellent source of information is the Sanborn fire insurance maps.

07/04/2016 - 12:05am
Cover to T4 by Ann Clare LeZotte

“Life Unworthy of Life”

The Nazi leaders (mostly) went along with idea of eugenics. That is, having more of the types of people they thought were worthy of keeping around, while getting rid of the people they believed were undesirable—whom they considered a “burden to society.” They blamed the Jews for the economic troubles their country faced after World War I. So, in their “Final Solution,” the Jews had to go. The horrors as millions of people—mothers, children, fathers, businesspeople, craftspeople, retirees—were taken to their imprisonment and death is remembered as the Holocaust.

07/01/2016 - 9:37am

Ashley Bryan is a man who uses his words and pictures to lift up readers' spirits. When he enters a room and starts to tell stories from Africa's past, he transports his audience to a faraway, long ago time to learn valuable lessons for today. His talents illuminate wisdom earned from a lifetime of hard work.

07/01/2016 - 12:01am
CRRL Guest Picks: Raina Krasner, Wildlife Educator

While working as a naturalist at Cattus Island County Park in Toms River, NJ, Raina realized her passion for teaching people about wildlife. Following that passion, Raina relocated to Virginia in August 2012 to begin her career as an outreach coordinator at the Wildlife Center of Virginia. As outreach coordinator, Raina spends her time teaching people about wildlife by sharing the stories of the patients that pass through the wildlife hospital and the education animals that call the Wildlife Center home.

06/28/2016 - 2:59am
Allegheny Front: Stories by Matthew Neill Null

The Alleghenies are a wild, harsh place. Starkly beautiful and unforgiving, these mountains that run through southern West Virginia have been home to farmers working small plots of land for generations and others who mine coal. For most, there is a razor-thin margin between survival and death, especially for those who look to nature to supplement their existence. For her part, nature, as Matthew Neill Null plainly shows in his Allegheny Front stories, does not care.

06/23/2016 - 2:50pm
The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game

“He saw the crowd roar.”

One of the best baseball players never heard the crowd cheer for him. William Hoy was born on an Ohio farm in 1862. When he was only a toddler, he caught meningitis and lost his hearing. He went to the state’s school for the deaf where he learned to communicate with sign language. William did well and graduated as valedictorian, but there was one thing he could not do while he was in school—play baseball.


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