Virginia Johnson

11/04/2009 - 10:32am

Four Mayors of Fredericksburg: An Oral History by Archer Williams.
Former mayors Charles Cowan, Josiah Rowe, Edward Cann, and Lawrence Davies give their impressions of the city's growth under their administrations, from the 1950s to the 1980s.

11/03/2009 - 3:33pm

From the Central Rappahanock Regional Library

Classic Georgian Style by Henrietta Spencer-Churchill.
A thorough detailing of the landscaping and interior design that defined Georgian style. Includes an overview of the Georgian and Regency periods (1714 to 1830), a glossary, and a design directory of the masters of Georgian style, such as Palladio, Chippendale, and Repton.

Fielding Lewis and the Washington Family: A Chronicle of 18th Century Fredericksburg by Paula S. Felder.
Local historian Paula Felder has researched the Lewis and Washington connections thoroughly and gives an interesting yet scholarly introduction to Kenmore's first family and its more famous relations.

11/02/2009 - 1:15pm
From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Battle of the Ironclads: The Monitor and the Merrimack by Alden R. Carter.
This book for elementary school students examines the construction, battles, and technological and historical impact of the Civil War battleships, the Monitor and the Virginia (Merrimack).
C.S.S. Virginia: Mistress of Hampton Roads by John V. Quarstein.
A lengthy account of the naval battle. Available to read in the Virginiana Room.
Part of the Virginia Regimental Histories series.

Duel Between the First Ironclads by William C. Davis.
The author weaves fascinating personal and historical detail into his narrative.
Also available as an eBook. Click here for more information on this collection.

Duel of the Ironclads: The Monitor vs. the Virginia by Patrick O'Brien.
A short book (36 pages) that is appropriate for elementary students who are just beginning to develop a taste for history.
10/29/2009 - 11:05am

You can search genealogy collections from North America, Europe, Australia, and more with Ancestry® Library Edition. There are over 4 billion listings for individuals found in more than 4,000 databases. Ancestry® includes many censuses, vital records, immigration records, family histories, military records, court & legal documents, directories, photos, maps, and more.

10/30/2009 - 1:15pm

Check out the new book by Anita L. Dodd and M. Amanda Lee on Stafford County. It's part of Arcadia Publishing's Then & Now series that takes old photographs of historic structures--some of which no longer exist--and juxtaposes them with modern views of the property. The authors include helpful notes on the buildings' histories.

07/12/2010 - 3:31pm

The Central Rappahannock Regional Library has books addressing issues that face cancer survivors and their families. Check out our booklist, Resources for Cancer Survivors for books to help patients and their families.

12/19/2013 - 3:39pm
If you've got trees, you've probably got squirrels. Whether gray or black or red or white, all squirrels act pretty much the same. However, there are other animals which are close kin to squirrels which are a little shyer of people. Chipmunks and prairie dogs are cousins.

Did you know:

  • Baby squirrels are called kittens?
  • Some of the noises squirrels use to talk to each other can't be heard by humans?

Read the rest of the All Fun article here!

10/08/2009 - 11:14am

Whether they're Galas, Granny Smiths, Yorks, Winesaps, or Ginger Golds, apples are one of Virginia's loveliest and most useful crops and were much enjoyed by the early colonists and pioneers as well as today's families. Crisp, sweet apples-- harvested in the chilly days of October, can be part of your celebrations in November and December. Click here to learn more about local apple festivals, apple recipes, apple crafts, and apple books for young readers.

11/05/2009 - 10:52am

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Black Businesses and Services, Rappahannock Area compiled by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Xi Upsilon Omega chapter.
Copyright 1997.

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