Rebecca Purdy

09/30/2013 - 2:13pm
Interactive Experiences

A recent gathering of the library’s storytime presenters made one thing apparent--oldies really are goodies!  When staff shared our preschool participant’s favorite songs and interactive activities, I was struck by how many of them revolved around beloved classics.  Games I played as a child--and bet you did too--like “Simon Says” and “Red Light, Green Light” are regularly incorporated much to the delight of children and their caregivers!  

09/09/2013 - 2:29pm

The first day of Kindergarten can simultaneously be fun and fearful, thrilling and anxious, exhilarating and tearful, and that’s just for the adults!  Imagine what it’s like for a 5-year old!

Easing that transition is why approximately forty public and private agencies, businesses, and individuals have joined together for the Passport to Kindergarten initiative spearheaded by Smart Beginnings Rappahannock Area.  Our goal is for every kindergarten student to begin school with a strong foundation for school success.  In support, library branches have dedicated a small portion of their annual Back to School display specifically to kindergarteners and created a bookmark filled with titles to help ease the transition for children and their caregivers.   

07/16/2013 - 3:02am
Books for the Early Elementary Set

The mid-2000s were kind to my extended family when within a 12-month period, two nieces and a nephew joined it.  This year, they will all reach that extremely enjoyable early elementary age.  Their sense of humor is growing strong, their curiosity runs rampant, they’re fun to talk with and I enjoy hearing their newly formed perspectives and opinions!  Two of those children turn 7 this week and I can’t wait for them to see their birthday presents--books of course. 

Non-fiction books coincide with this group's avid curiosity!  My niece has such an avid interest in the weather that the first thing she did when she got home from school was check the forecast on her mom’s old phone.   She’s going to love the DK (Dorling Kindersley) Eye Wonder book called “Weather.”  When the DK books were first published they seemed too busy, but children loved them and I have learned over the years to appreciate them as well.  Heavy with photographs accompanied by small amounts of text, these books are a great and very accessible way to enjoy non-fiction!  She can scan the table of contents for subjects of interest or just flip through, reading about any picture that captures her attention.  Mine was caught by a photo of some funny looking water bubbles.  Did you know that raindrops aren’t tear-shaped, but instead “ actually look more like squashed buns?” 

07/12/2013 - 2:08pm

There is no higher praise for a book than an award from its target audience.  Each school year, seventh and eighth grade students from thirteen area middle schools, read from among twenty recently published young adult books and vote on those they feel merit a Café Book Top Teen Pick award.  Chosen titles are displayed at local libraries where they fly off the shelf even before summer fun officially begins.  

07/09/2013 - 11:12am
The Camping Trip that Changed America

My husband’s job as a historical researcher frequently provides the opportunity to hear well-known historians opine on the importance of history.  The speech’s always end the same way; concern about the lack of historical knowledge among today’s youth.  The statistics support their fears, but while history is unchanging the future is not!  Think back to your favorite history teacher.  The chances are you enjoyed the class because that teacher brought history alive with stories and that’s an easy gift to share with your children.  There are many wonderful historical fiction and nonfiction titles published today for children and teens.  Gone are the days of biographies where George Washington cuts down a cherry tree!  Today, historical non-fiction is so well-written it has the ability to bring the past to life in vivid and memorable ways.  

The Camping Trip that Changed America” by Barb Rosenstock reads more like fiction than fact.  When President Theodore Roosevelt read naturalist John Muir’s book on vanishing forests, “he knew that was someone he just had to meet!”  Together they shared adventures while camping their way through what was then known as the Yosemite Wilderness.  Mordicai Gerstein’s dynamic illustrations capture Roosevelt’s liveliness and Muir’s quiet while the author’s words detail their commonalities: their love of the outdoors and their determination to save them. Thanks to this remarkable, yet little known, camping trip that brought these two unique individuals together, the number of national parks and monuments was dramatically increased.

04/30/2013 - 4:39pm
Books for a Trip to the Farmer's Market

A trip to the farmer’s market is one of the highlights of a visit to “Aunt Bek’s” house.  Recently, my six year-old niece declared she couldn’t wait to go to the market.  The only correlation I could make during the cold winter months was the grocery store and I kept wondering why the sudden interest in food shopping.  Finally it dawned on me that she meant the Farmers’ Market.  Her enthusiasm is understandable.  There she meets the people who planted the seeds and grew the produce.  The farmers welcome her, encouraging her to touch and taste a new and wide variety of food.  Never an adventurous eater, this is a chance for her to possibly expand her palette.  She also loves helping choose the ripest plums, pay for them and carry the bags.  

Starting in May, the library will visit each of the four area Farmers’ Markets once a month, offering information on library resources, checking out a few recipe books for cooking the delicious produce and providing quick, fun hands-on activities for children.  

03/01/2013 - 1:59pm

Boy are we lucky! The England Run Branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library system is one of only ten libraries in the country to receive the exhibit, Discover Earth: A Century of Change.  This exciting and fun educational opportunity is more than just a collection of information panels.  It features interactive, multimedia displays allowing visitors to experience digital information in a dynamic way, encouraging new perspectives on our planet and reinforcing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) concepts.  Between now and the end of April, visitors can experience the exhibit and enjoy special classes and events.  The exhibit will answer many earth science related questions, but it’s also designed to encourage scientific inquiry.  The library has purchased wonderful titles for adults and children to further pursue these interests.

02/05/2013 - 3:32am
Alanna: The First Adventure

Don’t you love the new year’s big events--the Super Bowl, the Oscars, and the American Library Association’s book awards?  

Last week, librarians everywhere eagerly watched this year’s announcements, hoping to hear that their favorites were selected.  Many shouted in exaltation, while others shook their fists at colleagues who didn’t make the choices we preferred.  Although I did a little of both, one announcement was particularly thrilling.  Tamora Pierce, one of my favorite authors, won the prestigious Margaret A. Edwards Award honoring her significant and lasting contribution to writing for teens.  

02/01/2013 - 8:50am

Athletes train for the big game, musicians rehearse for their recital and area youth services librarians prepare for the mock Theodor Seuss Geisel awards named after America’s beloved Dr. Seuss.  This past year we read a multitude of recently published beginning readers, carefully evaluating each for it’s quality of writing, distinctiveness and ability to instill in young children a love and enthusiasm for books.  

01/08/2013 - 1:59pm

No matter how hard we try to shelter young children from disturbing news, it has the unfortunate tendency to get through, whether from an overheard conversation or even by putting their new found reading skills to use and learning it for themselves.  School begins in a couple of days and your child may be expressing more than the usual post-holiday, lack of interest in returning.  Or perhaps they’re clingier than usual and you find you’re exhausting your bag of tricks to help them feel safe and reassured.  When you are running out of comforting words, the public library has books that can serve as conversation starters and offer new techniques to support you and your child in managing their fear and anxiety.  

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