Christie Hoerneman

11/27/2012 - 9:23am
Somewhere in Time by Richard Matheson

Part fantasy, part romance, Somewhere in Time by Richard Matheson is a time travel novel featuring Richard Collier, who falls in love with a turn of the century actress and travels back in time to meet her.

In 1971, Richard, on finding out that he is suffering from terminal cancer, embarks on a road trip from Los Angeles to Denver.  On the way, he stops at a historic hotel on the coast in San Diego where he sees a play program from the late 1800s and falls in love with the woman pictured on the front.  Captivated by her beauty, Collier researches the actress, Elise McKenna and finds out that she never married, had an overbearing manager named W.F. Robinson, and that she had a brief encounter in 1896 with a mysterious man at the hotel he is currently staying at.  Throughout his research, he realizes that he has fallen deeply in love with the woman, and convinces himself that he is the mysterious man with whom Elise had an affair.

11/13/2012 - 3:31am
The Uncommon Reader: A Novella by Alan Bennett

What if you had never noticed the small things in life?  Having lived a privileged life defined by ceremonies and duties, would you have had the time to notice the subtle changes in behavior of the people around you when upset, worried, or flustered?  And what would make you start noticing?  This is the premise for the brilliantly witty audiobook The Uncommon Reader, by Alan Bennett.

In this audiobook, richly-narrated by the author, the Queen, having never read for pleasure, stumbles upon a bookmobile outside the gates of Buckingham Palace and feels duty bound to check out a book.  While she dutifully finishes the first book she checks out, she feels duty bound once again to check out a second book, which is the one that captures her attention and leads to her rabid consumption of books.  Helping the Queen on this journey is Norman, a kitchen boy in the palace, who is promoted to page after his encounter with the Queen in the bookmobile.  With Norman as her accomplice, the Queen is introduced to an array of authors and begins to see the world through other people’s eyes. 

10/16/2012 - 3:32am
Jar City by Arnaldur Indridason

Arnaldur Indridason's Jar City: A Reykjavik Thriller, the first of a series starring Inspector Erlendur, is a gripping crime novel set in the insular world of Reykjavik, Iceland, where the climate is unforgiving and murder is a relatively rare phenomenon. 

An elderly man, Holberg, is found murdered in his city flat, and, unlike most murders in Iceland that are crimes of passion, Erlendur and his colleagues Sigrinudur Oli and Elinborg quickly realize that this is not going to be a typical murder investigation, especially since the only clues are a cryptic note stating, “I am HIM” and the photograph of a young girl’s grave.

04/24/2012 - 2:54pm
Mango Languages database

Are you traveling to a foreign country and are interested in learning some basic phrases in the language of the country you are traveling to? Or have you heard other people speaking a foreign language and felt a bit jealous that you don’t speak another language? Or do you need to improve your English? Or have you seen a television commercial trying to sell you a language course for a lot of money? The Central Rappahannock Regional Library has the perfect solution to take care of all your foreign language needs for free!

Mango Languages is a database that, as a library patron, you have access to for free 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To begin with, you can start using the database as a guest; however, if you plan on using Mango on several occasions, you will want to create a profile (all you need to do this is your library card number and an email address). By creating a profile, you can track your progress and leave a course in the middle and come back to the spot where you left off. Mango offers three levels of instruction for most of the languages that they offer. The quickest level to make your way through is the basic course. Mango Basic provides a quick introduction to a language and culture through the attainment of everyday conversational skills. Mango Complete 1.0 and 2.0 takes you even further than Mango Basic with more vocabulary and grammar skills, while still maintaining a focus on conversational skills. Each of these levels will help you to explore new and exciting languages; however, they will only give you a conversational grasp of the language rather than provide fluency.
03/18/2011 - 9:16am
The World Is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century by Thomas L. Friedman is a wonderful look at the world. Here are a few titles, which you may enjoy, that deal with global business, the world, and its future.
 

Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order” by Samuel P. Huntington
Huntington here extends the provocative thesis he laid out in a recent (and influential) Foreign Affairs essay: we should view the world not as bipolar, or as a collection of states, but as a set of seven or eight cultural "civilizations"?one in the West, several outside it?fated to link and conflict in terms of that civilizational identity. Thus, in sweeping but dry style, he makes several vital points: modernization does not mean Westernization; economic progress has come with a revival of religion; post-Cold War politics emphasize ethnic nationalism over ideology; the lack of leading "core states" hampers the growth of Latin America and the world of Islam. Most controversial will be Huntington's tough-minded view of Islam. Not only does he point out that Muslim countries are involved in far more intergroup violence than others, he argues that the West should worry not about Islamic fundamentalism but about Islam itself, "a different civilization whose people are convinced of the superiority of their culture and are obsessed with the inferiority of their power. From Publisher’s Weekly
 

The Elephant and the Dragon: The Rise of India and China and What it Means for All of Us” by Robyn Meredith
Meredith, a foreign correspondent, describes the global power shift occurring in India and in China as computers continue to change the way business is conducted. The U.S. and Europe have lost both low- and high-paying jobs to these countries, and there are other factors at play, such as the unquenchable global thirst for oil and massive environmental issues. ]his is a complicated story because as jobs are lost, cheap goods are being imported and sold at low prices to American consumers, and some retailers' stock prices are rising, to the benefit of workers' 401K accounts. The author notes, "In this decade, a dear pattern emerged: China became factory to the world, the United States became buyer to the world, and India began to become back office to the world." In this thought-provoking and well-researched book, the author advises that the U.S. must strengthen its education system, promote innovation, forget about protectionism or unfettered free markets, and focus on creating jobs. From Booklist
 

01/12/2011 - 3:51pm
High Noon

Come to the Central Rappahannock Regional Library as we present the the classic Western film High Noon at the England Run Branch on Thursday, January 13th at 2:00 pm. 

A lawman (Gary Cooper) stands alone to defend a town of cowardly citizens against a gang of revenge-seeking criminals. The odds are against the marshall, who stands to lose not only the town but also the love of his life (Grace Kelly).
07/27/2016 - 3:59pm
If you like The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form, and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father's servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption; and an exploration of the power of fathers over sons: their love, their sacrifices, their lies. (catalog summary)

Also by Hosseini, is his second book A Thousand Splendid Suns.

 

If you liked The Kite Runner, you might enjoy these other titles that also offer lots of plot twists and turns and a sprinkling of history:

Atonement by Ian McEwan
In this rich novel by the author of the Booker Prize-winning novel "Amsterdam, " a young girl unwittingly tells a tale that turns her family upside down. Brilliant and utterly enthralling in its depiction of childhood, love and war, England and class, "Atonement" is at its center a profound--and profoundly moving--exploration of shame and forgiveness, of atonement and the difficulty of absolution. (catalog summary)
 

 


 

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Dai Sijie
At the height of Mao's infamous Cultural Revolution, two boys are among hundreds of thousands exiled to the countryside for "re-education." The narrator and his best friend, Luo, guilty of being the sons of doctors, find themselves in a remote village where, among the peasants of Phoenix mountain, they are made to cart buckets of excrement up and down precipitous winding paths. Their meager distractions include a violin--as well as, before long, the beautiful daughter of the local tailor. But it is when the two discover a hidden stash of Western classics in Chinese translation that their re-education takes its most surprising turn. While ingeniously concealing their forbidden treasure, the boys find transit to worlds they had thought lost forever. And after listening to their dangerously seductive re-tellings of Balzac, even the Little Seamstress will be forever transformed. (catalog summary)
 

12/01/2010 - 2:47pm

Most people are familiar with the multi-volume Encyclopedia Britannica from their public library. Searching through the Encyclopedia Britannica, they could find information on almost any topic imaginable, and if they were lucky, pictures and graphs would be included in the entry.

With the advent of the internet, Encyclopedia Britannica has taken their product much further with their online edition of their classic encyclopedia. This encyclopedia, which is accessible 24/7 through the library’s website, has all of the information available in the print version but is enhanced with practical help and extra information, including photos, videos, and sound recordings.
 
Let’s compare a search for Mark Twain in the print and online versions. A search for Mark Twain in the print version yields a thorough article including a picture of the author. The online version of Encyclopedia Britannica includes everything the print has plus more! In the online version, the introduction page for the entry on Mark Twain has all the information neatly organized into five different areas. The first area, which is located directly under the article title offers a lot of practical features that will help cite the article, translate into Spanish, and email the article in order to share with others or to keep for yourself. There are also links to print the individual pages of the article and the entire article.
 
09/20/2016 - 3:10pm

Film noir is not easily defined. The actual words come from French and mean "black cinema." It was in France during the post-war years that the term was used to describe a certain set of Hollywood films that were saturated with a darkness and cynicism that was not seen before. These movies included The Maltese Falcon (1941), Double Indemnity (1944), Laura (1944), and Murder, My Sweet (1944).

03/09/2010 - 10:25am

Absurd, baroque, neorealism, surreal, and bizarre are all used to describe Federico Fellini’s film style, but none of them quite capture the true essence of his films. His famous and unique style of storytelling, which was largely autobiographical, blended reality and fantasy and was so distinct that it became known as Felliniesque.

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