All branches will be closed Wednesday, December 24 through Friday, December 26. We wish you a happy & safe holiday!

Lee Criscuolo

07/10/2014 - 3:00pm

What do nannies, billies, and kids have in common? They're all goats! Nannies are the moms, billies are the dads, and of course, kids are the kids!

07/02/2014 - 12:37pm

How doth the little busy bee
Improve each shining hour,
And gather honey all the day
From every opening flower!

--Isaac Watts, Against Idleness and Mischief

 

 Do you like honey on your toast? Thank a bee! Actually thank about 100,000 bees. That's how many can live in one hive! "Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you…" (It would take you about 27 hours of non-stop thanking to thank each bee in one hive.) Bees make honey by collecting nectar from flowers and carrying it back to their hive. They put it in a little wax cell. Then bees fan their wings over the nectar to help the water evaporate from it. When most of the water has evaporated, what's left is honey. They cover the cell with wax to save the honey for later. When a beekeeper's hive has more honey than the bees need to eat, the beekeeper harvests it.

06/13/2014 - 4:21pm
If you like The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Greene: "Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel's story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars brilliantly explores the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love." (Book Summary)

If you liked The Fault in Our Stars, you may also enjoy these titles:

It’s a Funny Kind of Story by Ned Vizzini
A humorous account of a New York City teenager’s battle with depression and his time spent in a psychiatric hospital.

 

 

 

Lock and Key by Sarah Dessen

When she is abandoned by her alcoholic mother, high school senior Ruby winds up living with Cora, the sister she has not seen for ten years, and learns about Cora's new life, what makes a family, how to allow people to help her when she needs it, and that she too has something to offer others.

 

03/26/2013 - 11:31am
Poetry Readings. Fridays in April at 4pm. England Run Library

Drop in to the England Run Branch each Friday this April at 4:00 pm for informal poetry readings in our “living room.” Bring a few poems to read or come to listen. Poems can be your own work or just ones you enjoy. If you’re a published poet, you’re welcome to bring copies of your work for people to purchase. No advance sign-up needed.

We’ll also be giving out poem scrolls all month long. Some of the poems were written by our own patrons, like this one! (posted here with permission of the author.) To submit your own poems, click here.
 

Poem scrollsSpring Snow

Winter pauses spring,
Maple and forsythia
At the ready, waiting.
Cardinals, juncos and finches
Flit and feast, 
Instinct trumps weather.

by Lori Izykowski

 

 

 

01/29/2013 - 11:18am
Put Your Poems in Someone's Pocket

Put your poems in someone’s pocket

If you’re an aspiring poet
We would sure like to know it
Send us your poem
You can do it from home
There’s no reason not to do it

Okay, I can see that my own poetry needs a little work. I’ll work on polishing it up. Meanwhile, we’re asking for some of your poems for Poem in Your Pocket Day ! In past years we’ve reprinted published poems (with permission), rolled them up into pocket sized scrolls and distributed them in the libraries.

This year we’d like to add some original poems by our patrons to this project. Submit as many of your original poems as you like via this online form, or via old-fashioned paper & ink at the research desk of any of our branches. We’ll select some to print & distribute in the form of beribboned scrolls in April (National Poetry Month.)

09/26/2012 - 11:17am
Gregory Peck as Captain Ahab

If you’ve never managed to make it all the way through this “great American classic,” NOW is the time to give it one more go! Wait, don’t click away! Hear me out! I’ve tried at least three times in the past to read Moby Dick & always get bogged down after a few chapters. All that whaling! All that boiling down of blubber! And, what is Ahab’s problem anyway?! So I’ve never “gotten” Moby Dick & never finished the book. I always abandon the Pequod, Ishmael, Ahab, & the gang and leave them floating in the middle of the ocean somewhere.

But NOT this time! You may have heard recently that writer, Philip Hoare, is leading a "big read" of Moby Dick, or, in this case, more like a “big listen.” He’s offering a chapter per day in free downloadable audio. There’s a different reader and a different artist’s illustration for each chapter.  I know about this because I have been reading, not a chapter per day, but a PAGE per day, of Moby Dick since August 9th , 2012, and writing a blog about it.  So, several people who’ve been following my blog have told me about the big read project. “This guy stole your idea!” they say indignantly.

12/03/2010 - 11:18am

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading  recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you.  Available for adults, teens, and kids.

In “The Tenderness of Wolves” by Stef Penney 
The year is 1867. Winter has just tightened its grip on Dove River, a tiny isolated settlement in the Northern Territory, when a man is brutally murdered… A local woman, Mrs. Ross, stumbles upon the crime scene and sees the tracks leading from the dead man's cabin north toward the forest and the tundra beyond. It is Mrs. Ross's knock on the door of the largest house in Caulfield that launches the investigation. Within hours she will regret that knock with a mother's love -- for soon she makes another discovery: her seventeen-year-old son Francis has disappeared and is now considered a prime suspect.
 
One by one… searchers set out from Dove River following the tracks across a desolate landscape -- home to only wild animals, madmen, and fugitives -- variously seeking a murderer, a son, two sisters missing for seventeen years, and a forgotten Native American culture before the snows settle and cover the tracks of the past for good.
An exhilarating thriller; a panoramic historical romance, and a gripping murder mystery. – from the publisher’s description
 
If you enjoyed The Tenderness of Wolves by Stef Penney, you may also like the following:
 
The Dead Lie Down” by Sophie Hannah
Ruth Bussey once did something wrong-horribly wrong-and was nearly destroyed by her punishment. Now, she has tentatively rebuilt her life and unexpectedly found love with a man named Aidan Seed. But Aidan also has a secret-he killed someone years ago, a woman named Mary Trelease. Ruth's horror turns to confusion when she realizes that she knows Mary Trelease, and Mary is very much alive. – publisher’s description


 
The Devil in the White City” by Eric Larsen
(Non-fiction) Bringing Chicago circa 1893 to vivid life, Erik Larson's spellbinding bestseller intertwines the true tale of two men--the brilliant architect behind the legendary 1893 World's Fair, striving to secure America’s place in the world; and the cunning serial killer who used the fair to lure his victims to their death. Combining meticulous research with nail-biting storytelling, Erik Larson has crafted a narrative with all the wonder of newly discovered history and the thrills of the best fiction. - publisher’s description
 
09/11/2009 - 12:29pm

The Swarm

One day in late May I looked out the window and saw an enormous thick cloud of bees in front of our barn. What should I do?! Shut the windows and cower? Call the exterminator? Call the nearest beekeeper? I called the nearest beekeeper. (He was just in the next room.) If you haven't got the beekeeping bug, you might not be pleased to have a swarm of bees in your yard, but to my family, it means honey!

05/04/2009 - 10:33am

Due to the stupidity revealed in this story, our names have been changed to protect our identities. My husband, Ed, will henceforth be referred to as "Herb," and I will be "Sally." Herb and I are experienced hikers. We've read A Walk in the Woods.

03/04/2010 - 2:47pm

When my husband suggested we buy a goat, I talked him out of it. From all I'd heard, a goat would be more trouble than it would be worth. They escape all the time. They eat everything they shouldn't. They get into all kinds of trouble. I knew a woman who had a goat that was always getting out and loved to climb on cars, leaving roofs and hoods covered with hoof-shaped dents. What would we do with a goat anyway?

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