Politics

Hero by Mike Lupica

Hero by Mike Lupica

Fourteen-year-old Zach Harriman lives in New York City with his mother and father.  He has been living the life of a typical teen until his father is killed under mysterious circumstances. In Mike Lupica's book Hero, Zach decides that following the devastating loss of his father, he wants to get to the bottom of the story.  He knows that his father was powerful and had the ear of the President of the United States.  He knows that his father was very skilled in his job of "getting things done."  Zach suspects that his father's death was no accident but a premeditated murder by an organization known as the "bads."

Zach's mother decides to throw herself into the presidential campaign for the candidate that Zach's father supported.  Though Zach supports his mother's political efforts, he decides to turn his energies towards the investigation of his father's death.  He starts asking questions.  He also begins to notice that he is being followed.  While walking though Central Park he is approached by a mysterious stranger who has information for him.  When Zach tells his beloved Uncle John about this man, he warns him to stay away from the stranger.  Who should Zach believe?

Two Classics of the French Revolution: Reflections on the Revolution in France

By Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine

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This volume contains two works, one of which is "The Rights of Man" by Thomas Paine, which supported the French Revolution, and for which Paine was indicted for treason in England in 1792.

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Born To Rock

By Gordon Korman

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High school senior Leo Caraway, a conservative Republican, learns that his biological father is a punk rock legend. When Leo loses his Harvard scholarship due to a misunderstanding, he embarks on his dad’s reunion tour, hoping for eighteen years of unpaid allowance.
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Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War

If your early education taught you something about Thomas Jefferson, it likely included facts on his part in authoring the Declaration of Independence, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. Jefferson was an ideas man—a deep thinker. Well-educated in the classics at the College of William and Mary, he stayed out of the usual undergrad troubles by keeping at his studies and socializing with the professors while classmates spent their time drinking, gambling, and racing their horses through the streets. As historian Michael Kranish relates in Flight from Monticello, he made plenty of friends, but they were from the same landed gentry class as himself.

He first encountered an upstart farmer named Patrick Henry at a friend’s dinner party. Jefferson was not impressed by his dress, candid manners or frank speech, which drew a crowd of admirers. Not so much the classical scholar, Patrick Henry was already a practicing attorney while Jefferson was still in school.  While Jefferson carried on learned conversations with his professors, Henry was winning cases—not with references to Greek and Roman scholars but by spelling out the plain merits of the case and the rules of law. Jefferson found his courtroom arguments crude but admired his ability to turn a phrase and set a crowd on fire.

1984

By George Orwell

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A classic since it's 1949 publication, Nineteen Eighty-Four continues to chill readers today, perhaps because the possibilities that Orwell wrote about could still happen, or perhaps some already have. Winston Smith is an ordinary worker in a future state where the government controls everything, watches everyone, and has erased all traces of rights and individuality. His job is to rewrite historical records so that The Party is always correct. In a time of constant war, Winston becomes disillusioned with his state of poverty and unhappiness. He begins to ask questions and even fight back. But The Party and Big Brother are always watching.
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