Chinese New Year

2014: The Year of the Horse

2014: The Year of the Horse

January 31, 2014, marks the beginning of the Chinese Year of the Horse. In Chinese astrology, people born in the Year of the Horse are believed to be hard-working, self-reliant, and cheerful. Years featuring the horse are supposed to be strong ones for travel, adventure, and opportunity.

To read more about adventures with horses, check out our book list, CRRL Kids: Horse Sense.

Chinese New Year's Dragon

By Rachel Sing

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A festive account of one family's Chinese New Year celebration. A little girl describes the preparations--everything from cleaning and shopping to food preparation and gifts--leading up to a magical Lunar New Year. In one dreamy sequence, the girl imagines herself in Ancient China, riding on a dragon, and watching the celebration unfold.
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The Last Dragon

By Susan Miho Nunes

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An old ten-man dragon in a Chinatown shop window turns Peter Chang's summer visit to Great Aunt, which he had been dreading, into an exciting adventure. The Last Dragon's silk is faded and torn, and its eyes are gone, but Peter finds people willing to help restore the dragon to life-Great Aunt's mahjongg friends, a tailor, a kite maker, a street artist-and learns his way around the neighborhood at the same time. The banquet that honors the dragon's return to its full glory and marks the end of Peter's visit is also a celebration of Chinatown's unique culture.

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D Is for Dragon Dance

By Ying Chang Compestine

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"In this alphabetical celebration of the Chinese New Year, a boy and a girl prepare for the festivities with their family. Each page or full spread, representing one letter, includes such headings as A is for Acrobats, I is for Incense, and P is for Peking Duck. One- to two-sentence subtitles under some of these headings explain the traditions. The Z is for Zodiac page includes a circular chart to allow children to find their own Chinese sign. The back matter includes an authors note on the traditions surrounding the New Year, an artists note on the calligraphy appearing in the background, and a recipe for dumplings." (School Library Journal)

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Moonbeams, Dumplings & Dragon Boats: A Treasury of Chinese Holiday Tales, Activities & Recipes

By Nina Simonds, Leslie Swartz, & the Children's Museum of Boston

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"Filled with delectable recipes, hands-on family activities, and traditional tales to read aloud, this extraordinary collection will inspire families everywhere to re-create the magic of Chinese holidays in their own homes. They can feast on golden New Year's dumplings and tasty moon cakes, build a miniature boat for the Dragon Boat Festival and a kite at Qing Ming, or share the story of the greedy Kitchen God or the valiant warrior Hou Yi."
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Chin Chiang and the Dragon's Dance

By Ian Wallace

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Chin Chiang has long dreamed of dancing the dragon's dance, but when the first day of the Year of the Dragon arrives and he is to dance with his grandfather, he is sure he will shame his family and bring bad luck to everyone.
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Tiger Treats for the Chinese New Year

In 2010, the Chinese New Year celebration begins on February 14, marking the beginning of the Year of the Tiger. Why not have valentines and paper lanterns at your party? Get ready for a tigerrific time. Here are some places to go for craft and food ideas:

DLTK's Jungle Tiger Section
Print out pages to color, make a paper bag puppet or a book end, and try other tiger crafts.