History Blog

07/21/2016 - 9:54am

From The Fredericksburg News, Thursday, January 10, 1878

 THE ICE HARVEST is a large one, and the business activity of the past few days to gather it in, has been a stirring scene on our wintry streets. Men and horses, waggons and carts, have improved the fleeting hours in the most rapid manner and the rumble of wheels over the icy ground has been unceasing from morning till night. Mr. A. P. Rowe's pond has furnished a large amount of excellent ice, about five inches thick, and all the Ice houses in town and country will be filled with this indispensable luxury, of home production this Season.

07/16/2016 - 1:41pm
A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe

What would really happen if thousands of people died in a city every day from an illness? Even worse, a city with few to no hospitals and only a bare bones emergency infrastructure? When the illness might leave no mark on a person until he or she fell over dead in front of you? And that’s when you realize, you have been exposed and could be next. What would you do?

07/08/2016 - 9:45am
Verifying Native American Ancestry through DNA Testing

“Great-Grandma said we have an Indian princess in the family . . . . “  

Since DNA testing for genealogy began nearly 20 years ago, we have made many leaps and bounds with how, when, and why it can be used. Many Americans have a family story that features the marriage of a Native American into the lineage. Frequently, these stories make us wonder about who we are on the inside.

On Tuesday, August 2, at 7:00, Shannon Combs-Bennett, biologist and genealogist, will discuss what DNA testing could tell you about your ancestry, as well as which test you may want to take to verify your genealogy. An author and frequent lecturer on genealogy, Shannon will present her talk in support of the library’s Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Wellness exhibition.

07/08/2016 - 10:47am
When in Tsenacommacah, Do as the Powhatans

Did Native American barbecue contribute to the success of the English colony at Jamestown?  According to author, historical barbecue consultant, and Patawomeck Indian Tribe member Joe Haynes, the answer is yes! Joe will visit the Headquarters Library on Wednesday, August 3.

He will draw upon numerous historical and contemporary sources to explore some of the lesser-known contributions made to Virginia’s culture and cookery by the Powhatan Indians, who called their land Tsenacommacah. According to Joe, many Virginian foods known to us today, such as smoked pork, hoecakes, and barbecue, all exhibit the unmistakable influence of the Powhatans.

07/06/2016 - 12:45pm
Stylistic Architecture in Fredericksburg

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

America's Forgotten Architecture by Tony P. Wrenn and Elizabeth D. Mulloy.
This book teaches how to look for architectural beauty in old buildings which may have been forgotten and whose loveliness deserves to be preserved. It features crisp black and white photos from across America. The authors explain early architectural styles and define preservation terms. Wonderful for browsing.
07/21/2016 - 12:53pm
Opening Reception for Native Voices Exhibition

On July 26 at 7:00, come learn from Yvonne Epps-Giddings, a nurse with the Indian Health Service, who will speak on the unique, interconnected relationships of health, illness, and cultural life for Native Americans. Her talk will be the highlight of the opening reception for the exhibit, Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, which will be on display through the month of August.

 

Ms. Epps-Giddings is completing her degree to be a Doctor of Public Health.  Although she now lives on a reservation in western Arizona, she is a Virginia native and a member of our neighboring Nottoway Indian Tribe.  

Chief John Lightner of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe of Virginia will also offer opening remarks. Based in Stafford County, the Patawomecks are one of 11 tribes recognized in the state. About 80% of the 1500 tribal members live within 10 miles of their historic village of Patawomeck.

03/28/2016 - 2:05pm
The Virginiana Room

A Welcome from Library Director Martha Hutzel:

“The CRRL is very happy to offer to the community a more spacious and attractive local genealogy room, complete with historical records, beautiful, museum-quality historical wall panels, an attractive work space and free computers and databases for research. Please stop by any time we are open!"
 

03/28/2016 - 2:06pm

Nancy Moore, the library's Virginiana Room Manager, has been awarded Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc.'s President's Exceptional Service Award.

Nancy Moore, Virginiana Room Manager

The award is in recognition of Nancy's multi-faceted work to support Fredericksburg's historic preservation efforts. This includes her career reporting for The Free Lance-Star newspaper documenting and publicizing preservation issues, working on the city's Memorials Advisory Commission, preserving the Mary Washington Monument, and her work in CRRL's Virginiana Room.

03/22/2016 - 12:27pm

This article was first printed in the May 1978 issue of the Fredericksburg Times magazine and appears here with the author's permission.

This American who is truly deserving of the terms "great" and "famous" was born January 14, 1806 in Spotsylvania County. He was the seventh child of Richard and Diana Minor Maury.

02/12/2016 - 12:50pm
Symbols of Racism Talk and Race Relations Panel Discussion

Carlos Cato, a graduate of the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute, will host two discussions on race at Headquarters Library. 

On Monday, February 22, at 6:30, he will give a talk on the symbols of racism, with a look at their origins and status today.

Pages

Subscribe to History Blog