History Blog

06/07/2011 - 10:20am
D. P. Newton, Founder of the White Oak Civil War Museum

This interview airs beginning June 8.
D. P. Newton has preserved and arranged a most remarkable record of life during an era of turmoil in our nation. The White Oak Civil War Museum reflects his passion and dedication to accuracy in compiling this unique and extensive collection. Debby Klein meets Mr. Newton at the museum on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

05/18/2011 - 4:55pm
Twin Towers, American flag in background

The Fredericksburg Area Museum and Cultural Center is preparing for a new exhibition, "Fredericksburg Remembers 9/11," to commemorate the ten year anniversary of the terror attacks of September 11, 2001. The museum wants to partner with our community and is asking you to share your memories.

The exhibit will focus on these themes:
 

  • first responders at the Pentagon or World Trade Center
  • anyone who was an eyewitness to the attacks
  • airline pilots who were on duty/flying that day
  • local citizens and their experiences at school, work, or home as the events of the day unfolded
  • aftermath stories
  • the Muslim members of our community and what their experiences have been as they relate to the day of the attacks and the months and years following
  • how far we have come in the ten years since the attacks and how our every day lives have changed - for example stricter airport security and our involvement in wars overseas

Do you have stories, original objects, and images you might consider sharing?

05/03/2011 - 8:39am
Civil War Legacy Project

Fredericksburg-area residents are encouraged to help save a part of their state's heritage by sharing original Civil War letters, diaries and photos with archivists from the Library of Virginia. Of special interest are "materials created during the period 1859-1867 that reflect social, political, military, business and religious life in Virginia during the period of the Civil War and the early period of Reconstruction." The original documents will be scanned and returned.

The Fredericksburg Area Museum and Cultural Center, partnering with the Library of Virginia and the Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission, will host this one-day event at the museum's Catherine W. Jones McKann Center on May 7 from 9 am - 5 pm. The scanned materials will be part of a statewide, online collection of original Civil War manuscripts that still remain in private hands. For more information, click here.

Appointments are now being made, and are strongly encouraged. A limited number of walk-ins will be accommodated as scheduling allows. To make an appointment to have your documents digitized, contact Heidi Krofft, special events coordinator, at hkrofft@famcc.org or 540/371-3037, ext. 141.

04/26/2011 - 2:50pm
CRRL Presents: Al Conner, Stafford County Historian and Author

This interview airs beginning April 26.
Many years of work with the Stafford County Historical Society, an extensive collection of historic artifacts, and authoring a definitive history of the county have made Al Conner an authority and the person to talk to about Stafford County history. Debby Klein does just that when she visits Al Conner on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

04/22/2011 - 10:02am
CRRL Presents: Dr. Rachel Louise Clay, Author - Remembering Rhythm and Blues

This interview airs beginning April 13.
Dr. Rachel Clay’s biography, The Orioles; Second String Albert “Diz” Russell, documents the history of the legendary vocal group, the Orioles, and reflects on the great influence of its members and rhythm and blues in the history of American music. Debby Klein joins Dr. Clay in her home on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

03/01/2011 - 2:21pm

George Mason, future patriot, spent part of his childhood in Stafford County. His father died by drowning when he was very young, so he sometimes stayed with relatives including his uncle, John Mercer who lived at Marlborough Point. His uncle was a lawyer and landowner. He had a large library for the time—more than 1,500 books—and 11-year-old George enjoyed the library, including law commentaries his uncle had written. 

After studying at a private school in Maryland and with tutors (including his uncle), George Mason took control of his family’s lands. He was the second largest land owner in Fairfax County—the largest being George Washington. When Washington went to serve as head of the Continental Army, George Mason took his place in the Virginia legislature. 
02/09/2011 - 1:10pm
Library of Congress Picture of Fugitive Slaves Crossing the Rappahannock

Civil War Sesquicentennial programs at the library kick off with a lecture series, "The Civil War Comes to Stafford," to be presented at the England Run branch. Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park Historians will bring the Civil War to our backyard.

Join us for the first lecture in this series:

The Crossing: Slaves, Stafford, and the Great 1862 Exodus to Freedom, lecture by John Hennessy

England Run, Thursday, February 10, 7-8pm

In the spring and summer of 1862, Fredericksburg and Stafford witnessed one of the greatest flights to freedom in American history. As many as 10,000 slaves fled homes, farms, and plantations in nearby counties, bound for the Union army along the Rappahannock River. For individual slaves, the exodus represented an immense risk and an uncertain journey into freedom. For white residents, the exodus meant rapid and profound social change--the end of a labor system more than 200 years old. And for the army and federal government, the flood of freedom seekers--months before the  Emancipation Proclamation--raised a profound and simple question for: what now? This program will look at the great 1862 exodus across the Rappahannock from the human level, men and women forcing change on a community, state, and nation unprepared.

Find out more about Civil War Sesquicentennial events and resources.

01/31/2011 - 10:27am
CRRL Presents: Louellen Whitefeather Young Silver, Discovering Your Heritage

This interview airs beginning February 2.
Caring and curious about her ancestry and her extensive family's place in the history of White Oak, in Stafford County, Lou “Whitefeather” Silver has explored her genealogy on a journey back through 400 years and 16 generations. She shares her extensive knowledge and amazing memory in an interview with Debby Klein on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

04/10/2013 - 10:45am
CRRL & Civil War Sesquicentennial

The CRRL is proud to partner with area historians, museums, tourism agencies, organizations, churches, and scholars to provide programs and information that can promote understanding of the events that exploded here in the 1860s and their far-reaching impact.

Over the next four years the community will be invited to commemorate-through lectures, re-enactments, exhibits, film screenings, and musical performances-the extraordinary fact that we were a war zone from 1861-1865.

 

01/18/2011 - 3:15pm

This interview airs beginning January 19.
Jack Edlund has been slowly uncovering the secrets of Fredericksburg’s Old Stone Warehouse. He is also a collector of old and interesting artifacts and an artist. Jack talks about his dedication to discovery and digging in the dirt to learn about the past.

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