Women's history

Buffalo Gals: Women of the Old West

By Brandon Marie Miller

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"Seeking religious freedom, economic prosperity, or 'elbow room,' thousands of women emigrated to the American West between the 1830s and the 1890s. They traveled alone or with their families by railroad, wagon train, and even on foot. Miller brings these pioneers' stories to life through quotations from diaries, letters, and vintage travel guides. Equally dramatic are the sepia-toned photographs that appear on nearly every page, the most delightful of which is a picture of two daredevils in long skirts cavorting on a rock formation in Yosemite Valley. While this title covers much of the same information as Judith Alter's Women of the Old West (Watts, 1989), it is livelier and gives more equitable coverage of African American pioneers, Native Americans, and Mexican Americans. Buffalo Gals will appeal to fans of Laura Ingalls Wilder's books, and to any student with a hankering for a good read. Yeeeee-ha!"--Rebecca O'Connell, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh for School Library Journal

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A Is for Abigail: An Almanac of Amazing American Women

By Lynne Cheney

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Each letter of the alphabet is represented by an important woman in the history of the United States, as well as others in her same field of accomplishment.

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Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women

By Catherine Thimmesh

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Tells the story of how women throughout the ages have responded to situations confronting them in daily life by inventing such items as correction fluid, space helmets, and disposable diapers.
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Remember the Ladies: 100 Great American Women

By Cheryl Harness

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n a letter cautioning her husband to "Remember the Ladies," Abigail Adams makes a plea for women's rights. She realized that women had the potential for greatness if only their brethren would, as Sarah Grimke wrote in 1838, "take their feet from off our necks."

Cheryl Harness introduces readers to 100 illustrious American women. From colonial poet Phillis Wheatley and Civil War nurse Clara Barton to comic actress Lucille Ball and Vietnam Memorial architect Maya Ying Lin, she highlights ladies of all talents, races, and eras.

Cheering the advancements of recognizable leaders, the author also introduces readers to less familiar but equally important women. Her passion and humor reflect the attitudes of pioneers who pushed the boundaries of the feminine sphere to the limits -- and then pushed a little further.

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Different Like Coco

By Elizabeth Matthews

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"Coco couldn't afford to dress like the corseted ladies of high society and she was never going to be shapely. There was no point in trying to be like them. Instead, she tried to be different."

The rags-to-riches story of Coco Chanel plays out in a wonderful picture-book biography that is as full of style and spirit as its heroine is.

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Independent Dames: What You Never Knew about the Women and Girls of the American Revolution

By Laurie Halse Anderson

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"The stories of 22 'Revolutionary Grandmothers' take center stage in this well-illustrated volume. A few of the names are familiar—Phillis Wheatley, Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Deborah Sampson—but as the author establishes, there are many women and girls whose large and small contributions to the cause of independence have been largely ignored. Prudence Wright and Sarah Shattuck guarded their village when the men were fighting at Concord and Lexington, and they captured a British spy. After her husband was killed in battle, Margaret Corbin fired his cannon until she was shot, making her the first American woman to receive a military pension. Whether the women were disguising themselves as men in order to be soldiers, raising money for suffering soldiers, sewing and knitting for the troops, or participating in protests or a boycott of British goods, their actions were significant." -- School Library Journal
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony: A Friendship That Changed the World

By Penny Colman

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In the Spring of 1851 two women met on a street corner in Seneca Falls, New York - Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a thirty-five year old mother of four boys, and Susan B. Anthony, a thirty-one year old, unmarried, former school teacher. Immediately drawn to each other, they formed an everlasting and legendary friendship. Together they challenged entrenched beliefs, customs, and laws that oppressed women and spearheaded the fight to gain legal rights, including the right to vote despite fierce opposition, daunting conditions, scandalous entanglements and betrayal by their friends and allies. W
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Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires along the Way)

By Sue Macy

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"Take a lively look at women's history from aboard a bicycle, which granted females the freedom of mobility and helped empower women's liberation. Through vintage photographs, advertisements, cartoons, and songs, Wheels of Change transports young readers to bygone eras to see how women used the bicycle to improve their lives. Witty in tone and scrapbook-like in presentation, the book deftly covers early (and comical) objections, influence on fashion, and impact on social change inspired by the bicycle, which, according to Susan B. Anthony, 'has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.'"

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No Place for a Lady: Tales of Adventurous Women Travelers

By Barbara Hodgson

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Hodgson profiles adventurous women who sacrificed personal comfort and respectability to pursue experiences traditionally open only to men. Filled with fascinating portraits, historical maps, and intricate drawings, this is at once a beautifully illustrated exploration of early travel and a spirited celebration of women.
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Riding for My Life

By Julie Krone

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Julie Krone had a rough ride, first breaking into a male-dominated sports field and then surviving several serious falls. A high-school dropout who had some problems with drugs early in her career became the first woman to win a Triple Crown race (the Belmont, 1993) and the first to win more than $50 million in purses. A champion book by a champion rider.
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