Women's history

Ms. and the Material Girls: Perceptions of Women from the 1970s through the 1990s

By Catherine Gourley

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Contents:

Prologue: The women's strike for equality, August 26, 1970 -- Who took the "r" out of "Mrs."? -- Bionic women and real-life heroines -- From denial to indulgence : the body obsession -- The material world, or welcome to the 1980s -- Guerrilla girls and other militant females march into the 1990s -- Epilogue: The girl power revolution.

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The Search for Nefertiti

By Joann Fletcher

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Dr. Fletcher investigates a mummy believed to be of little importance and discovers that it is the remains of Queen Nefertiti. She documents the 13 years she spent studying Nefertiti’s life and examines how the kings and queens of Egypt are viewed in popular culture, while explaining how modern technology and forensics have changed archaeology.

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Lieutenant Nun: Memoir of a Basque Transvestite in the New World

By Catalina de Erauso

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“Born in 1585, Catalina de Erauso led one of the most wildly fantastic lives of any woman in history. Refusing to be regimented into the quiet habits of a nun's life, she escaped from a Basque convent at age fourteen dressed as a man, and continuing her deception, ventured to Peru and Chile as a soldier in the Spanish army. After mistakenly killing her own brother in a duel, she roamed the Andean highlands, becoming a gambler and a killer, and always just evading the grasp of the law.”

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Wives and Daughters: The Women of Sixteenth Century England

By Kathy Lynn Emerson

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Sixteenth-century England was scarcely a paradise for anyone by modern standards. Yet despite huge obstacles, many sixteenth-century women achieved personal success and even personal wealth. This is a resource for all interested in this time-period.

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How I Learned to Ride the Bicycle: Reflections of an Influential 19th-Century Woman

By Frances E. Willard

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This prominent American social reformist decided to take up bicycling at the age of 53. She saw mastering a bicycle as a way for young women to master her personal destiny. Includes a separate section, “Women and Cycling: The Early Years,” that recalls all sorts of interesting yet specious reasons why young ladies should not attempt to master the machine.

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The Quilt That Walked To Golden

By Sandra Dallas and Nanette Simonds

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Quilts fill this narrative re-creation of the history of the West from the time of the early pioneers to the present day. The purpose of quilts and the art of quilting provide a window into the lives of women, their friendships, and their sorrows.

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Southern Quilts: Surviving Relics Of the Civil War

By Bets Ramsey and Merikay Waldvogel

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This is a wonderful history of the tradition and techniques of quilt making in the antebellum South. It includes lots of color photographs and the oral histories of 29 Southern quilts that survived the Civil War.

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Civil War Women: Their Quilts, Their Roles, and Activities for Re-enactors

By Barbara Brackman

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History buffs as well as quilters will enjoy these accounts of quilting-related experiences during the Civil War from women in both the North and the South. Brackman also includes instructions and full-size patterns for nine projects adapted from Civil War quilts, as well as suggestions for using today's reproduction fabrics.

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Women Sailors & Sailors' Women: An Untold Maritime History

By David Cordingly

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"In this illuminating historical narrative, maritime scholar David Cordingly shows that in fact an astonishing number of women went to sea in the great age of sail. Some traveled as the wives or mistresses of captains. A few were smuggled aboard by officers or seaman. A number of cases have come to light of young women dressing in men's clothes and working alongside the sailors for months, and sometimes years. In the U.S. and Britsh navies, it was not uncommon for the wives of bosuns, carpenters, and cooks to go to sea on warships. Cordingly's tremendous research shows that there was indeed a thriving female population--from female pirates to the sirens of legend--on and around the high seas."

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The Mapmaker's Wife: A True Tale of Love, Murder, and Survival in the Amazon

By Robert Whitaker

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At the heart of this sweeping tale of adventure, discovery and exploration is one woman's extraordinary journey, inspired by her love for a man she had not seen in 20 years. In 1769, Isabel Grameson - an upper-class Peruvian woman who had lived all her life close to home - set out across the Andes, and down the length of the Amazon in order to rejoin her husband in French Guiana. Her 3,000-mile trek through untamed wilderness was one that no woman (and few men) had made before. (Book jacket)

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