Women's history

Those Courageous Women of the Civil War

By Karen Zeinert

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Examines the important contributions of various women, Northern, Southern, and slave, to the American Civil War, on the battlefield, in print, on the home front, and in other areas where they challenged traditional female roles.

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Harriet Tubman, Secret Agent: How Daring Slaves and Free Blacks Spied for the Union During the Civil War

By Thomas B. Allen

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"Readers discover that Harriet Tubman--well-known to them as an ex-slave who led hundreds of her people to freedom along the Underground Railroad--was also a spy for the Union Army. More specifically she worked behind Confederate lines in South Carolina getting information about troop movement and Rebel fortifications from slaves that she was leading to freedom on the Underground Railroad."

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Civil War Doctor: The Story of Mary Walker

By Carla Joinson

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A biography of Mary Edwards Walker was one of the first women to receive a medical degree in the United States and went on to serve as a doctor to the Union soldiers during the Civil War. Her unconventional and determined life paved the way for generations of women in medicine and beyond.

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I'll Pass For Your Comrade: Women Soldiers in the Civil War

By Anita Silvey

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Sarah Emma Edmonds enlisted because she believed in the Union cause; Melverina Peppercorn joined to stay near her twin brother. Although women were not allowed to enlist as soldiers in the Civil War, many disguised themselves as men and fought anyway.
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If You Lived When Women Won Their Rights

By Anne Kamma

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In the familiar question-and-answer format, this installment in the acclaimed If You Lived . . . history series tells the exciting story of how women worked to get equal rights with men, culminating in the 19th amendment to the Constitution.
(From the publisher's description)

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Bring Me Some Apples and I'll Make You a Pie: A story about Edna Lewis

By Robbin Gourley

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From the whippoorwill's call on the first day of spring through the first snowfall, Edna and members of her family gather fruits, berries, and vegetables from the fields, garden, and orchard on their Virginia farm and turn them into wonderful meals. Includes facts about the life of Edna Lewis, a descendant of slaves who grew up to be a famous chef, and five recipes.

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Maggie L. Walker: Pioneering Banker and Community Leader

By Candice F. Ransom

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"Let us be strong and make big plans." These famous words from Maggie L. Walker - best known as the first female bank president in the United States - effectively sum up her story. All her life, Maggie set about making and achieving big plans. She participated in the first black student strike in 1883, led an organization that helped poor African Americans, established a savings bank for them, and helped black people start their own businesses.

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The Double Life of Pocahontas

By Jean Fritz

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A biography of the famous American Indian princess, emphasizing her life-long adulation of John Smith and the roles she played in two very different cultures.

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Good Women of a Well-Blessed Land: Women's Lives in Colonial America

By Brandon Marie Miller

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A social history of the American colonial period with a focus on the daily lives of women, including European immigrants, Native Americans, and slaves.

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Shawnee Captive: The Story of Mary Draper Ingles

By Mary R. Furbee

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In 1755, young mother Mary Draper Ingles was captured by the Shawnee Indians in the Shenandoah Valley. This is the true story of how she survived and escaped to freedom.

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