South Carolina

Pirates of the Carolinas by Terrance Zepke

Pirates of the Carolinas by Terrance Zepke

The Age of Pirates has been so thoroughly romanticized in the popular imagination that many people do not know about the real lives of pirates. Films ranging from Captain Blood to the Pirates of the Caribbean series create the idea of piracy as freedom from the boring drudgery and stress of life on land. But how much did pirates’ real lives resemble those of the fantastic swashbucklers of the silver screen?  Terrance Zepke’s book, Pirates of the Carolinas, is a series of short biographies of some of the best-known pirates who operated out of North Carolina. Although not as in-depth as some other accounts, such as Daniel Defoe’s A General History of the Pirates, the book provides concise, factually accurate information on some of the most notorious figures in American history.

Dori Sanders' Country Cooking: Recipes and Stories from the Family Farm Stand

By Dori Sanders

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Dori Sanders was born in York County, South Carolina. Her father's farm, where her family still raises Georgia Belle and Elberta peaches, is one of the oldest black-owned farms in York County. Her father was a school principal and an author. She attended York County public schools and later studied at community colleges in Prince George's and Montgomery counties in Maryland. She does most of her writing during the winter months, in Maryland, where she is an associate banquet manager of a hotel near Andrews Air Force Base. In the growing season she farms the family land, cultivating peaches, watermelons, and vegetables, and helps staff Sanders' Peach Shed, her family's open-air produce stand.

Her recipes include not only new interpretations of old-time favorites such as Spoon Bread, Chicken and Dumplings, Corn Bread, and Buttermilk Biscuits, but also her "Cooking for Northerners"--original dishes such as Winter Greens Parmesan, Roasted Mild Peppers, Fresh Vegetable Stew--and, of course, great recipes for peaches. A Literary Guild and a Rodale Press Book Club selection.

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Slaves in the Family

By Edward Ball

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"In 1698, Elias Ball arrived in Charleston, South Carolina, from England to take possession of his inheritance: part of a plantation and twenty-five slaves. Elias and his progeny built a slave dynasty that lasted for 167 years, buying more than a dozen plantations along the Cooper River near Charleston, selling rice known as 'Carolina Gold,' and assembling close to 4,000 African and African American slaves before 1865, when Union troops arrived on the lawns of the Balls' estates to force emancipation.

"In Slaves in the Family, Edward Ball, a descendant of Elias, has written a nonfiction American saga like no other. Part history, part journey of discovery, this is the story of black and white families who lived side by side for five generations -- and a tale of everyday Americans confronting their vexed inheritance together. Using the copious plantation records of his family, supplemented by both black and white oral tradition, Ball uncovers the story of the people who lived on his ancestors' lands -- the violence and opulence, the slave uprisings and escapes, the dynastic struggles, and the mulatto children of Ball slaveholders and 'Ball slaves.' He identifies and travels to a prison in Africa from which his family once bought workers. Most remarkably of all, Ball also locates and visits some of the nearly 12,000 descendants of Ball slaves and reveals how slavery lives on in black and white memory and experience."

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Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl

This is Week 10 of a 12-Week series of blog posts reviewing new young adult books. Check back each Monday for a new review.

Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl is a page-turning story of star-crossed teenage love with a Southern gothic twist and a side of magic.

In the town of Gatlin, South Carolina, everyone knows everybody's business and nothing exciting ever happens, unless you count the annual re-enactment of a local Civil War battle. Unbeknownst to the residents of Gatlin (at least most residents) beneath the thick Southern accents and Spanish moss lurks a whole other magical world, one of hidden underground libraries, voodoo and deadly family curses.

Lena Duchannes and Ethan Wate bridge the gap between these two worlds - two worlds that were never meant to meet.

Francis Marion: The Swamp Fox

By Kay Cornelius

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Born in South Carolina, 15-year-old Francis Marion signed up become a sailor on a doomed ship. He fought in the French and Indian War and became known for his guerilla-style fighting in the American Revolution. He often squared off with the hated British commander Banastre Tarleton.
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