Politicians

John Randolph of Roanoke

By David Johnson

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"One of the most eccentric and accomplished politicians in all of American history, John Randolph (1773--1833) led a life marked by controversy. The long-serving Virginia congressman and architect of Southern conservatism grabbed headlines with his prescient comments, public brawls, and clashes with every president from John Adams to Andrew Jackson. The first biography of Randolph in nearly a century, John Randolph of Roanoke provides a full account of the powerful Virginia planter's hard-charging life and his impact on the formation of conservative politics."
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Gabby: A Story of Courage and Hope

By Gabrielle Giffords and Mark Kelly

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"Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, showed Americans how optimism, an adventurous spirit, and a call to service can help change the world. Their arrival in the spotlight came under the worst of circumstances. On January 8, 2011, while meeting with constituents in Tucson, Arizona, Gabby was the victim of an assassination attempt that left six people dead and thirteen wounded. Gabby was shot in the head; doctors called her survival 'miraculous.'"
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The Governator: From Muscle Beach to His Quest for the White House, the Improbable Rise of Arnold Schwarzenegger

By Ian Halperin

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"Who is the real Arnold Schwarzenegger? Investigative journalist and number one New York Times bestselling author Ian Halperin reveals the true and untold story about this larger-than-life and often outrageous figure From his childhood in Austria to his rise as a star of American conservative politics, the story of Arnold Schwarzenegger's life reads like the script of a Hollywood B-movie penned by Horatio Alger. In this exclusive peek behind the curtain, award-winning scoop hunter Ian Halperin wades through the myths and rumors to discover the real Arnold behind the icon, a man defined by unbridled ambition and an unending quest for power.

"Based on extensive research, undercover forays, and candid interviews with many of the Terminator's close friends and peers, Halperin brings the myth to life with:

  • a riveting journey through Schwarzenegger's past to explore his relationship with his abusive father and his feelings toward the Nazi party.
  • insights into the shadowy world of bodybuilding and Schwarzenegger's early steroid use.
  • an investigation of Schwarzenegger's reputation as a bully and a womanizer, including his alleged affairs and public accusations of sexual harassment--behavior that earned him the nickname 'the Groper.'
  • an in-depth look at his long-standing fascination with the Kennedys and his remarkably seamless assimilation into his wife's fabled family.
  • a detailed look into Maria's startling weight loss.
  • an analysis of Schwarzenegger's political career, revealing him to be a surprisingly effective and talented governor.
  • the behind-the-scenes machinations of the Kennedy family to influence Schwarzenegger's political agenda.

And finally Halperin uncovers the never-before-told details of an incredible and audacious plan for Schwarzenegger to attempt to rewrite the Constitution and run for president of the United States."

Does not include the latest scandals touching his family.

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Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family

By Condoleezza Rice

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This is the story of Condoleezza Rice-- her early years growing up in the hostile environment of Birmingham, Alabama; her rise in the ranks at Stanford University to become the university's second-in-command and an expert in Soviet and Eastern European Affairs; and finally, in 2000, her appointment as the first Black woman to serve as Secretary of State.

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Vernon Can Read! A Memoir

By Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. with Annette Gordon-Reed

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Since the 1960s, civil rights activist Vernon Jordan has provided leadership to organizations such as the NAACP, the United Negro College Fund, and the National Urban League. Here, he describes his life including his work registering black voters in the South, his survival of an assassination attempt, and his relationships with American presidents and business leaders. The volume includes a section of b&w photographs from Jordan's childhood to the present.

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Hero by Mike Lupica

Hero by Mike Lupica

Fourteen-year-old Zach Harriman lives in New York City with his mother and father.  He has been living the life of a typical teen until his father is killed under mysterious circumstances. In Mike Lupica's book Hero, Zach decides that following the devastating loss of his father, he wants to get to the bottom of the story.  He knows that his father was powerful and had the ear of the President of the United States.  He knows that his father was very skilled in his job of "getting things done."  Zach suspects that his father's death was no accident but a premeditated murder by an organization known as the "bads."

Zach's mother decides to throw herself into the presidential campaign for the candidate that Zach's father supported.  Though Zach supports his mother's political efforts, he decides to turn his energies towards the investigation of his father's death.  He starts asking questions.  He also begins to notice that he is being followed.  While walking though Central Park he is approached by a mysterious stranger who has information for him.  When Zach tells his beloved Uncle John about this man, he warns him to stay away from the stranger.  Who should Zach believe?

Honey Don't

By Tim Sandlin

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Honey, a savvy Texas girl with a weakness for older guys, offers sexual consolation to a raunchy President on the prowl. Her Mafia-connected boyfriend interrupts the scene, and the POTUS croaks. What to do? (from Library Journal)
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J.S. Potter's Hazel Hill (1890-1899)

This article was first printed in the January, 1979 issue of the Fredericksburg Times magazine and appears here with the author's permission. Hazel Hill no longer stands.

The old Fredericksburg home, Hazel Hill, was built about 1793 by John Minor (1761-1816) at the time of his marriage (his second) to Lucy Landon Carter. It remained the Minor home until about 1855 after which its ownership passed through several hands including Montgomery Slaughter (Fredericksburg Mayor, 1860-1868) and Judge Henry Souther. It was the latter who, in the spring of 1890, sold Hazel Hill to the Honorable Joseph S. Potter.
Mr. Potter was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1866 to 1871 and the Senate from 1871 to 1874. He was appointed to a high government office in Germany where he served until April, 1890 at which time he moved to Fredericksburg. He was described as a man who could spread sunshine among people; who could make two blades of grass grow whe= re none had grown before!

Downtown Hotels Abounded in the 19th Century

Today, Fredericksburg ponders the building of a single downtown hotel, but during the 19th century, Fredericksburg was known as a town of hotels.

Some were large and elegant. Some catered to specific clienteles. All left their mark on Fredericksburg’s history.

Most people traveling from Washington to points south stopped over in Fredericksburg. So did those who were on their way to the Virginia springs.