1930s

Growing Up

By Russell Baker

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"Russell Baker is the 1979 Pulitzer Prize winner for Distinguished Commentary and a columnist for The New York Times. This book traces his youth in Loudon County, Virginia. When Baker was only five, his father died. His mother, strong-willed and matriarchal, never looked back. After all, she had three children to raise and these were depression years. As is often the case, early hardships made the man."
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The Rappahannock Film Club Presents . . . My Man Godfrey

Come join the Rappahannock Film Club and the Central Rappahannock Regional Library as we present the classic comedy film My Man Godfrey at the Headquarter's Library on Saturday, October 2nd at 2:00 pm.

A high-society scavenger hunt leads to levity when scatterbrained socialite Irene Bullock (Carole Lombard)
stumbles upon an erudite vagabond named Godfrey (William Powell) living in the city dump.

What Is Film Noir?

Film noir is not easily defined. The actual words come from French and mean "black cinema." It was in France during the post-war years that the term was used to describe a certain set of Hollywood films that were saturated with a darkness and cynicism that was not seen before. These movies included The Maltese Falcon (1941), Double Indemnity (1944), Laura (1944), and Murder, My Sweet (1944).

Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl   

Timothy Egan

Egan tells an extraordinary tale in this visceral account of how America's great, grassy plains turned to dust, and how the ferocious plains winds stirred up an endless series of "black blizzards" that were like a biblical plague: "Dust clouds boiled up, ten thousand feet or more in the sky, and rolled like moving mountains" in what became known as the Dust Bowl.

9780618773473
Adult

John Lee Pratt's Frigidaire

 This sizzling summer seems a fitting season to recall the almost forgotten story of John Lee Pratt and the Frigidaire, one of the first "mechanical" refrigerators.

In 1919 Mr. Pratt, a King George County boy who would become a multi-millionaire and owner of Chatham Manor, was a General Motors engineer.

That same year GM had produced the Frigidaire, one of the first mechanical refrigerators for home use. They were called "mechanical" because some were powered by electricity, others by gas.