True Crime

London Walks -- London Stories

By David Tucker & the Guides

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"Written by the expert guides of London Walks, London's oldest, most acclaimed walking tour company, London Stories collects local insight and knowledge that can only be gained through years of tour-leading experience. These theme-based walks offer something for everyone, whether a history buff, a fan of the paranormal, or those looking for fun off the beaten path. The walks include Sinister London, focusing on haunted London and Jack the Ripper; Literary London, from Shakespeare to Dickens; Public Houses, showcasing the old pubs of Soho; and a Mystery and Secrets walk exploring the city's hidden past. Perfect for tourists who want to experience London life beyond Trafalgar Square as well as for Londoners eager to step off the Circle Line and discover the secrets on their own doorstep, this guide offers a fascinating glimpse into the capital's rich history."
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Kings and Queens of England: Murder, Mayhem and Scandal

By Brenda Ralph Lewis

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Arranged chronologically by dynasty, this lively reference details the most notorious events throughout British royal history, with hundreds of fascinating tales of murder, mayhem, and scandal.
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The London Monster: A Sanguinary Tale

By Jan Bondeson

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In the 1790s, well before Jack the Ripper, more than 50 victims fell prey to the London Monster. A man went on trial for the crimes, but was he guilty?  According to The Philadelphia Inquirer: "The facts in this case are so peculiar that no novelist would have dared to invent them." See what *you* think!

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The Corpse Had a Familiar Face: Covering Miami, America's Hottest Beat

By Edna Buchanan

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For eighteen years, Pulitzer Prize-winner Edna Buchanan had one of the most exciting, frightening, and heartbreaking jobs a newspaperwoman could have -- working the police beat for the Miami Herald. Having covered more crimes than most cops, Buchanan garnered a reputation as a savvy, gritty writer with a unique point of view and inimitable style. Now, back in print after many years, The Corpse Had a Familiar Face is her classic collection of true stories, as witnessed and reported by Buchanan herself. From cold-blooded murder, to violence in the heat of passion, to the everyday insanity of the city streets, Edna Buchanan reveals it all in her own trademark blend of compassionate reporting, hard-nosed investigation, and wry humor that has made her a legend in the world of journalism.

 

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Portraits of Guilt: The Woman Who Profiles the Faces of America's Deadliest Criminals

By Jeanne Boylan

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Unlike many police artists, Ms. Boylan tries to "get inside" the personalities behind the suspects she tries to help catch. She describes the work she did in the cases of the Unabomber, Susan Smith, and Polly Klass, among others. The book holds some very interesting insights into her work and the people she is drawing.

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America's Dumbest Criminals: From the Hit TV Show...

By Daniel Butler, Alan Ray, and Leland Gregory

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"From the hit syndicated television show come 200 stories of fumbling felons, clumsy crooks, and ridiculous robbers--all the crimes are true, but the names have been changed to protect the stupid!"

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Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

By John Berendt

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Shots rang out in Savannah's grandest mansion in the misty, early morning hours of May 2, 1981. Was it murder or self-defense? For nearly a decade, the shooting and its aftermath reverberated throughout this hauntingly beautiful city of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares.
Available on audio as well as in a movie version starring Kevin Spacey and John Cusack.

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The Lost King of France: How DNA Solved the Mystery of the Murdered Son of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette

By Deborah Cadbury

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"Louis-Charles, Duc de Normandie, enjoyed a charmed early childhood in the gilded palace of Versailles. At the age of four, he became the dauphin, heir to the most powerful throne in Europe. Yet within five years he was to lose everything. Drawn into the horror of the French Revolution, his family was incarcerated and their fate thrust into the hands of the revolutionaries who wished to destroy the monarchy. In 1793, when Marie Antoinette was beheaded at the guillotine, she left her adored eight-year-old son imprisoned in the Temple Tower. Far from inheriting a throne, the orphaned boy-king had to endure the hostility and abuse of a nation. Two years later, the revolutionary leaders declared Louis XVII dead. No grave was dug, no monument built to mark his passing. Immediately, rumors spread that the prince had, in fact, escaped from prison and was still alive... ."

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Who Murdered Chaucer: A Medieval Mystery

By Terry Jones

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"In this work of historical speculation Terry Jones and a team of international scholars investigate the mystery surrounding the death of Geoffrey Chaucer over 600 years ago.… What if he was murdered? What if he and his writings had become politically inconvenient in the seismic social shift that occurred with the overthrow of the liberal Richard II by the reactionary, oppressive regime of Henry IV? … This hypothesis is the introduction to a reading of Chaucer's writings as evidence that might be held against him, interwoven with a portrait of one of the most turbulent periods in English history, its politics and its personalities."

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The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary

By Simon Winchester

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There are two tales in this page-turner. One is how the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) was compiled, which is fascinating in itself; and the other is a gripping story of a convicted murderer who spends his life sentence as a major contributor to the OED. This one stays in your mind for a long, long time.

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