Lee family

Prodigy Houses of Virginia: Architecture and the Native Elite

By Barbara Burlison Mooney

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The grand houses created by 18th-century Virginians are a huge tourist draw, but what does their design tell us about the natures of the men who built them?  The auhor "illuminates the fortunes, motivations, and aspirations of the wealthy and powerful owners who built their 'homes'  with the object of securing their status and impressing the public."
Among those included are the houses of Governor Alexander Spotswood, William Fitzhugh, the Lee family of Westmoreland, and Thomas Jefferson. Historians and students of architecture should enjoy this unusual approach to the time period.

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Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History

By John C. Wilson

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Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History is filled with photos and illustrations that, along with informative text, give an lively dimension to the region's past, from early settlements to steamboat days to 20th-century lives well-lived.

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The Lee Girls

By Mary P. Coulling

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Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Randolph Custis Lee lived at Arlington House while he worked at the War Office in Washington. During the 1830s and 1840s, they had seven children, four of whom were girls. This book tells of the lives of Mary, Anne, Agnes, and Mildred, none of whom married, two of whom died young, and all of whom were known as "the Lee girls."

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The Lees of Virginia, Seven Generations of an American Family

By Paul C. Nagel

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"There are few American families that feature such a collection of characters, both heroic and ignoble, who have made such a mark on history as the Lees. In The Lees of Virginia, Paul Nagel chronicles seven generations of Lees, covering over two hundred years of accolades and scandals. We meet Thomas Lee, who dreamed of America as a continental empire, and his son, Arthur Lee, who created a political storm with his accusations against Benjamin Franklin. Arthur's cousin was Light-Horse Harry Lee, a controversial cavalry officer in the Revolutionary War, whose wild real estate speculation led to imprisonment for debt and finally self-exile in the Caribbean. One of Harry's sons, Henry Lee, further disgraced the family by seducing his sister-in-law and frittering away Stratford, the Lees' ancestral home. It was a third son, Robert E. Lee, who would become the family's redeeming figure, a brilliant tactician still revered for his lofty character and military success. In these and numerous other portraits, Nagel discloses how, from 1640 to 1870, a family spirit united the Lees, making them a force in Virginian and American affairs."
(From the publisher's description)

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The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book

By Anne Carter Zimmer

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"With recipes for breads, cakes, puddings, sweets, soups, main dishes, vegetables, drinks, and home remedies, The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book will serve as a ready reference on traditional American cookery. For each entry, the author provides the original recipe, helpful notes on the ingredients and techniques employed, and instructions--based on careful kitchen testing--for adapting the recipe in the modern kitchen. Peppered throughout with family stories and illustrated with photographs from the Lee family and other archives, the book is both an informative investigation of southern foodways and a fascinating look at one family's household history."
(From the publisher's description)

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Growing Up in the 1850s: The Journal of Agnes Lee

By Agnes Lee, edited and with a foreward by Mary Custis Lee deButts

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Robert E. Lee's young daughter kept a journal from the time she was twelve to the time she was seventeen. Agnes tells of her days at West Point where her father taught as well as time spent at the Female Institute in Staunton. Also mentioned are the death of her beloved grandparents and teaching slave children to read in preparation for their emancipation.
The second part consists of the recollections of Mildred, another Lee daughter, and family letters.
Includes an index.
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Tidewater Dynasty: The Lees of Stratford Hall

By Carey Roberts and Rebecca Seely

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From Tom Lee to Robert E. Lee, who made the fateful decision to turn from the nation he loved to defend the state he loved more, the Lees of Virginia dominated both their local and our national landscape.
From the publisher's description

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"Miss Hale is a slim, puny silent Virgin…."

By Philip Vickers Fithian

From the Journal and Letters of Philip Vickers Fithian, A Plantation Tutor of the Old Dominion, 1773-1774

Editor's note: the spellings are to period and from Mr. Fithian's diary.

Fryday 24.

La[s]t night we had a Gust of Rain & Thunder; very acceptable—To Day in course Mr. Christians Dance happens here--He came before Breakfast—Miss Jenny Washington came also, & Miss Priscilla Hale while we were at Breakfast

Coaching Day at Stratford Hall

 On Sunday, April 24, 2005, the parade of 19th-century-era coaches came again to historic Stratford Hall, once home to two signers of the Declaration of Independence, a Revolutionary War hero, and Robert E. Lee. The triennial event is a major fundraiser for the National Historic Landmark in Westmoreland County.