Reconstruction era

They Called Themselves the KKK: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group

By Susan Campbell Bartoletti

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Documents the history and origin of the Ku Klux Klan from its beginning in Pulaski, Tennessee, and provides personal accounts, congressional documents, diaries, and more.

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Reconstruction and the Rise of Jim Crow: 1864-1896

By Christopher Collier, James Lincoln Collier

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Describes the struggles following the Civil War to decide how to deal with the newly freed slaves, through the years of Reconstruction, Jim Crow, sharecropping, and segregation.

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Cause: Reconstruction America, 1863-1877

By Tonya Bolden

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After the destruction of the Civil War, the United States faced the immense challenge of rebuilding a ravaged South and incorporating millions of freed slaves into the life of the nation. On April 11, 1865, President Lincoln introduced his plan for reconstruction, warning that the coming years would be "fraught with great difficulty." Three days later he was assassinated. The years to come witnessed a time of complex and controversial change.
(From the publisher's description)

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Traveling the Freedom Road: From Slavery and the Civil War Through Reconstruction

By Linda Barrett Osborne

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This book features illustrations, original documents, photographs and first-person narratives to give an account of slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Includes a time line.

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Great Lives Series: Booker T. Washington

Born a slave in Franklin County, Virginia, Booker T. (Taliaferro) Washington went on to become a nationally-known leader and educator. He shared his educational philosophy with U.S. presidents and served as the first president of Tuskegee Institute, now Tuskegee University.

Historic Churches of Fredericksburg: Houses of the Holy

By Michael Aubrecht

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Recalls stories of rebellion, racism and reconstruction as experienced by Secessionists, Unionists and the African American population in Fredericksburg's landmark churches during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.
Using a wide variety of materials compiled from the local National Park archives, author Michael Aubrecht presents multiple perspectives from local believers and nonbelievers who witnessed the country's "Great Divide." Learn about the importance of faith in old Fredericksburg through the recollections of local clergy such as Reverend Tucker Lacy; excerpts from slave narratives as recorded by Joseph F. Walker; impressions of military commanders such as Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson; and stories of the conflict over African-American membership.
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African-American History of Stafford, Virginia

(This brochure was originally printed in the fall of 2002.)

Colonial Times

Africans first arrived in the Virginia colony in 1619 as indentured servants. In the late 1600s slaves were brought into the sparsely settled Rappahannock Valley, primarily to serve as agricultural laborers.

The Road to Freedom: A Story of Reconstruction

By Jabari Asim

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It is 1865, and freedom is in the air. Ten-year-old Ezra Taplin is living on a North Carolina plantation when Union soldiers arrive to set the slaves free. Ezra and his father, Silas, must deal with their newfound liberty while finding a way to support themselves. After spending time in a Union work camp, they journey to Charleston, South Carolina, where freed slaves are organizing to establish better lives for themselves and their families.

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The Land

By Mildred Taylor

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This prequel to Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry is the gripping coming-of-age story of Paul Logan, son of a land owner and a former slave, who confronts prejudice and back-breaking work in the Reconstruction South in pursuit of his dream to own his own land.

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The Adventures of High John the Conqueror

By Steve Sanfield

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A collection of sixteen tales about High John the Conqueror, the traditional trickster hero of blacks during and immediately after the time of slavery.

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