18th century

The Flight of Bonnie Prince Charlie

By Hugh Douglas

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The flight of Bonnie Prince Charlie was one of history's greatest manhunts. It created Scotland's most treasured legend during 1746, when Charles Edward, heir to the Stuart throne, was ruthlessly hunted down after the Battle of Culloden.

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The Pleasure Gardens of Virginia: From Jamestown to Jefferson

By Peter Martin

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A scholarly look back at gardens of the past. Gardeners recorded their efforts from the settlement of Jamestown on. Both Jefferson and Washington were avid horticulturalists and left detailed note of their plants.

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Archaeology and the Colonial Gardener

By Audrey Noel Hume

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Gardening meets archaeology in this publication from the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.
Available to read in our Virginiana Room at the Headquarters branch.

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A Field Guide to American Houses

By Virginia and Lee McAlester

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The guide that enables you to identify, and place in their historic and architectural contexts, the houses you see in your neighborhood or in your travels across America. 17th century to the present.

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Pirates on the Chesapeake: Being a True History of pirates, Picaroons, and Raiders on Chesapeake Bay, 1610-1807

By Donald G. Shomette

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“…a dazzling array of swashbuckling pirates, picaroons, and sea rovers pitted against the often feckless representatives of an outpost government authority in the Chesapeake Bay region. It is an exciting and dramatic 200-year history that begins grimly with the "starving time" in the Virginia colony in 1609 and ends with the peaceful resolution of the Othello affair with the French in 1807. In between lies a full panoply of violent and bizarre buccaneering incidents… .”
(Publisher’s description)
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Historic Sail: The Glory of the Sailing Ship from the 13th to the 19th Century

By Stephen Howarth

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Attractive drawings and interesting explanatory notes on 91 ships, from “a Danish cog of the 13th century” to a Scottish tea merchant of 1869. Plates 56 and 57 feature a fluyt, the same type as the Godspeed. Fluyts were popular merchant vessels from roughly 1595 to 1670. Historic sources for the illustrations are noted.

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Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Merchant Seamen, Pirates, and the Anglo-American Maritime World, 1700-1750

By Marcus Rediker

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What was it like when Britain ruled the waves, but pirates haunted the coasts of colonial America? In this maritime history, Rediker examines a dangerous, adventurous brotherhood of the sea.

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The Mapmaker's Wife: A True Tale of Love, Murder, and Survival in the Amazon

By Robert Whitaker

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At the heart of this sweeping tale of adventure, discovery and exploration is one woman's extraordinary journey, inspired by her love for a man she had not seen in 20 years. In 1769, Isabel Grameson - an upper-class Peruvian woman who had lived all her life close to home - set out across the Andes, and down the length of the Amazon in order to rejoin her husband in French Guiana. Her 3,000-mile trek through untamed wilderness was one that no woman (and few men) had made before. (Book jacket)

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Accommodating Revolutions: Virginia’s Northern Neck in an Era of Transformations, 1760-1810

By Albert H. Tillson, Jr.

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The Northern Neck runs from Falmouth in Stafford County all the way down to Windmill Point in Lancaster County, bounded by the Rappahannock River to the south and the Potomac River to the north.  Now it’s a sleepy section of Virginia but it was once called the Athens of the New World.

What a foreign world it seems to us today—the antebellum Northern Neck--where wealthy white plantation owners bought and sold slaves with ease along with the services of bound whites for years at a time. How could such a system that relied on keeping people in their places and maintaining the established order bring forth some of the greatest leaders of the Revolutionary period? History is complicated, and Accommodating Revolutions digs into court documents and newspaper accounts to flesh out what was going on with those who served the gentry as the winds of political and religious upheaval shook Virginia.
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Accommodating Revolutions: Virginia’s Northern Neck in an Era of Transformations, 1760-1810 by Albert H. Tillson, Jr.

The Northern Neck runs from Falmouth in Stafford County all the way down to Windmill Point in Lancaster County, bounded by the Rappahannock River to the south and the Potomac River to the north.  Now it’s a sleepy section of Virginia but it was once called the Athens of the New World.