18th century

Good Wives, Nasty Wenches & Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia

By Kathleen M. Brown

Go to catalog

A feminist examination of the roles of women of different classes--lower class white, upper class white, slave, and Indian--in colonial Virginia, with much reliance on primary sources.

Reserve this title

Marlborough Point: In the Stream of History

Follow Marlborough Point Road down to the eastern tip of Stafford County, and you will pass by lots of new housing mushrooming into the forests and fields that were once favored by both the Native Americans and colonial settlers.  This section of the county is home to not just centuries of local history but millennia.

If You Lived in Williamsburg in Colonial Days

By Barbara Brenner

Go to catalog

More than two hundred years ago, two thousand people lived in the town of Williamsburg, Virginia. This book tells you what it was like to grow up in colonial days, before there was a United States of America.

Reserve this title

Shawnee Captive: The Story of Mary Draper Ingles

By Mary R. Furbee

Go to catalog

In 1755, young mother Mary Draper Ingles was captured by the Shawnee Indians in the Shenandoah Valley. This is the true story of how she survived and escaped to freedom.

Reserve this title

Anne Bailey: Frontier Scout

By Mary R. Furbee

Go to catalog

During the Revolutionary War, scouts tracked enemy movements and carried messages to troops moving through the frontier. Most scouts were men, but occasionally women filled the role, doing their part in the fight for American independence. This is the exciting and true story of one such woman, Anne Bailey, who risked her life in the American Revolution.

Reserve this title

Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History

By John C. Wilson

Go to catalog

Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History is filled with photos and illustrations that, along with informative text, give an lively dimension to the region's past, from early settlements to steamboat days to 20th-century lives well-lived.

Reserve this title

Colonial Virginia Cookery

By Jane Carson

Go to catalog

Cooking methods and recipes as done by Virginia's colonists. Recipes are drawn from period cookbooks by Mrs. Custis, Mrs. Randolph, Mrs. Glasse, and numerous others. Dressing trout, stewing oysters, making ice cream, dressing mutton, and layering trifles were part and parcel of colonial cooking.
Also available to check out.

Reserve this title

Chesapeake Waters: Four Centuries of Controversy, Concern, and Legislation

By Steven G. Davison

Go to catalog

"...chronicles four centuries of public attitudes about the Bay - and legislative responses to them - from 1607, the date of the first English settlement in Jamestown, Virginia, to the close of the twentieth century. In the last few decades, wide-reaching measures by federal and local governments have influenced how people use the Bay: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency completed a massive study of Bay quality; the Chesapeake Bay Program was launched; the Critical Area Protection Act went into effect."
(From the publisher's description)

Reserve this title

Pirates on the Chesapeake: Being a True History of Pirates, Picaroons, and Raiders on Chesapeake Bay, 1610-1807

By Donald G. Shomette

Go to catalog

"Here is a dazzling array of swashbuckling pirates, picaroons, and sea rovers pitted against the often feckless representatives of an outpost government authority in the Chesapeake Bay region. It is an exciting and dramatic 200-year history that begins grimly with the "starving time" in the Virginia colony in 1609 and ends with the peaceful resolution of the Othello affair with the French in 1807. In between lies a full panoply of violent and bizarre buccaneering incidents that one is hard pressed to imagine."
(From the publisher's description)

Reserve this title

The First Emancipator: The Forgotten Story of Robert Carter, the Founding Father Who Freed His Slaves

By Andrew Levy

Go to catalog

Robert Carter III was born into the highest circles of Virginia's Colonial aristocracy, neighbor and kin to the Washingtons and Lees and a friend and peer to Thomas Jefferson and George Mason. But in 1791, Carter severed his ties with this elite at the stroke of a pen. Having gradually grown to feel that what he possessed was not truly his, clashing repeatedly with his neighbors, his friends, government officials, and, most poignantly, his own family, he set free nearly five hundred slaves in the largest single act of liberation in the history of American slavery before the Emancipation Proclamation.
(From the publisher's description)

Reserve this title