Shelf Life Blog

07/22/2015 - 5:03pm
Jim Henson: The Biography by Brian Jay Jones

Jim Henson: The Biography approaches the man through his work. This makes sense since, as he was the artist who redefined puppetry, Henson created and entertained almost non-stop for four decades.

07/22/2015 - 1:47pm
The Great Trouble: A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel by

Eel’s early morning spent scavenging on the Thames River as a “mud-lark” brought a few things to the surface. There was a nice piece of copper, but he had to give that over to one of the stronger mud-larkers, a kindly blacksmith turned to this low way of making a living. But he did come away with two valuable things—or at least valuable to him. One was a half-drowned cat, thrown into the river by a bully boy. The other was a word of warning from the old blacksmith. Fish-Eye Bill was looking for him again, he said. A year Eel had spent in an easier life, getting his schooling, working two jobs and staying away from places he might be seen by Bill’s crew. It sounded like the makings for serious danger. Though in Deborah Hopkinson’s The Great Trouble, Eel’s problems are only beginning.

07/22/2015 - 5:03pm
The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt and Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

The Day the Crayons Quit is a most imaginative book in terms of its story and its artwork. One day while looking in his crayon box, Duncan finds a stack of scrawled messages instead of crayons.

One by one we read each color's reason for going on strike, written in its color. Red feels totally overworked. Purple is tired of contributing to messy pictures. Yellow and Orange cannot agree on who deserves to be the color of the sun. This is a young artist's worst nightmare.

07/22/2015 - 5:01pm
From Here to Infinity by Michael D.C. Drout

We are all about lifelong learning at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, and we hope that you are, too. Whether it is through our collection or our classes and events, we offer ways to educate for so many different types of learners. I learn best by listening, so one of my favorite methods of acquiring new information is though our Modern Scholar audio courses.

02/05/2014 - 2:43pm
Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson

Calamity came to Earth ten years ago in the book Steelheart, by Brian Sanderson. David was eight years old when the entire planet was changed by Calamity and the Epics were created. The Epics were ordinary folks who gained superpowers and were transformed into super villains.

01/30/2014 - 3:01am
Mysterious Traveler by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham, illustrated by P.J. Lynch

No one knows the Sahara Desert like Issa. He is a famous guide along the dangerous paths the gold and salt caravans take to their far destinations. Everyone knows to ask for his help. But one day five riders with six camels come bounding through the village with a desert storm quick on their heels. They do not stop to ask for Izza's help. They gallop on, with the sixth camel carrying a basket with its tiny burden. In Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham’s The Mysterious Traveler, Issa watches them ride out of sight not knowing that the scrap of ribbon they leave behind will change his future.

07/22/2015 - 1:48pm
The Girl Who Married an Eagle by Tamar Myers

“We laugh and we cry.”

In Tamar Myers’ The Girl Who Married an Eagle, there is a lot of both.

Julia Elaine Newton has come all the way from Ohio to the Belgian Congo to save souls and teach English to young girls who are runaway child brides. She’s really quite pleased with herself and thinks she knows what she’s doing. It’s 1959, and her spotless cotton circle skirt is just the thing to wear in Africa, comfortable and fresh, or it is until it becomes blood-soaked while she tends a future student who has been attacked by hyenas. Exquisite, brilliant, ten-year-old Buakane has run away on her marriage night from Chief Eagle, a man nearly four times her age. She is his 23rd wife.

07/22/2015 - 1:48pm
Thieftaker by D.B. Jackson

In 1760s Boston, there is trouble brewing, and it’s not just the upcoming tea party. A young and beautiful girl from a wealthy family has been murdered mysteriously. It isn’t only a mystery as to who killed her and why—the bigger mystery is how. There’s not a mark on her body. It seems as though it was done by magic, and, in D.B. Jackson’s Thieftaker world, magic is a definite possibility.

07/22/2015 - 5:01pm
Hawkeye: My Life as a Weapon by Matt Fraction

Hawkeye: My Life as a Weapon doesn't have the slick visuals or bright colors that you would normally imagine a member of the Avengers getting. Nor does it offer a conventional superhero storyline. Clint Barton, a master archer, was created by Stan Lee in 1964. Writer Matt Fraction is breathing life into him by contrasting him with all of those other super-powered heroes.

01/23/2014 - 10:13am
In a Blue Room by Jim Averbeck, illustrated by Tricia Tusa

It’s bedtime, but Alice is bouncing and wide-awake. “Time for bed,” Mama says, “and I’ve brought flowers for your room.”

“I can only sleep in a blue room,” says Alice.

“Blue is my favorite.

and those—

aren’t—

blue.”

“Ah … but smell,” Mama says.

Mama brings many special things to help her little girl sleep: a silken quilt; a cup of tea; bells on strings—though, as her daughter sleepily protests, none of them are blue. But at last, the light goes off, the moon shines in, and Alice gets her wish.

Pages

Subscribe to Shelf Life Blog