Biographies & Memoirs

08/15/2017 - 10:48am
A History of Classic Monsters: The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera is considered to be one of the oldest classic movie monsters—and one of the creepiest. Born in a French novel, put into two silent films and a popular Broadway musical, the Phantom has made an impact on the horror world.

08/11/2017 - 12:47am
If You Like The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

08/09/2017 - 11:16am
CRRL Guest Picks: Nimali Fernando, "Dr. Yum"

Known by some in my community as "Doctor Yum," I am a pediatrician and founder of The Doctor Yum Project, a nonprofit organization in Spotsylvania. We try to help families understand the connection between good food and good health with cooking instruction and nutrition education.

08/07/2017 - 1:59pm
Jamie Ford

Headquarters, Tuesday, October 10, 7:00–8:30

Join us as we hear bestselling author Jamie Ford discuss his work. His novels include Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, Songs of Willow Frost, and his new Love and Other Consolation Prizes. A question & answer session and book signing will follow. Refreshments served.

About the Author:

Jamie Ford has worked themes from his Asian-American heritage into his books. Ford may not sound like an Asian name, but it was adopted by Jamie Ford's great-grandfather, Min Chung, who emigrated from Kaiping, China, to San Francisco in 1865. Taking the European name William Ford, Min Chung became a miner in Nevada. 

Min Chung/William Ford's great-grandson Jamie Ford earned a degree in design from the Art Institute of Seattle and also attended Seattle’s School of Visual Concepts. He worked in advertising, first as an art director and later as a copywriter. On his own, he submitted short stories to writing contests and small literary venues and spent many of his vacations at writing conferences. In an interview on WordLily, Jamie explained that he began writing about Asian-American characters after his father died, when he found he wanted to reconnect with his Chinese heritage.

Mr. Ford grew up in Oregon as well as in Washington State, a setting he would revisit in his works. Jamie Ford's first novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, spent two years on the New York Times' bestseller list, winning many awards, while it received much praise from both general readers and professional reviewers.

08/07/2017 - 3:25pm
Great Lives Presents: Author and Superhero Investigator Marc Tyler Nobleman

Marc Tyler Nobleman likes comic books. Actually, he loves comic books. And, he loves the histories of his comic-book writers. On Saturday, September 9, from 3:00-4:00 at England Run Branch, Mr. Nobleman will be joining us as part of the University of Mary Washington's Great Lives series to talk about his beloved superheroes, the books he has written, and the inspiration he continues to receive from creators such as Bill FingerJerry Siegel, and Joe Shuster

07/25/2017 - 5:35pm
That Time When Salvador Dalí, Henry Miller, and Anaïs Nin Lived Together  in Caroline County (Spoiler Alert: They Did Not Get Along Well)

Home to sprawling plantations, the even more sprawling Fort A.P. Hill, and historic sites such as assassin John Wilkes Booth’s death place and explorer William Clark’s birthplace, Caroline County is an archetypal rural Virginia county, far closer in spirit to the somnolent Clayton County from Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind than the avant-garde art and literature communities of cities like New York and Madrid. But for several months back in 1940 and 1941, Bowling Green, Caroline County’s seat, was the unlikely home to artist Salvador Dalí and authors Henry Miller and Anaïs Nin.

07/12/2017 - 12:23am
The Sword and the Broom: The Exceptional Career and Accomplishments of John Mercer Langston

When Glory came out in 1989, movie audiences were excited to see a relatively unknown side of the Civil War that highlighted the sacrifices of the Massachusetts 54th, a “colored” volunteer regiment. Gripping as the story that unfolded on the screen was, there was much more to it, of course. In real life, other people’s stories became part of the regiment’s history as the Civil War gripped the nation.

John Mercer Langston, along with Frederick Douglass, acted as a recruiter for the 54th. As an abolitionist and orator, he was an excellent choice, and this task was just one of Langston’s civic accomplishments. Although he had spent most of his life in a free state, John was familiar with plantation life. His father had been a white plantation owner in Louisa County, Virginia—not far from Spotsylvania. His mother had been his father’s slave. But his parents’ story was not a common one for the era. His father freed his mother, and, although they were not allowed to marry for legal reasons, they lived together as man and wife for the rest of their days, their children considered to be freeborn.

06/21/2017 - 1:43pm
Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of A Great American Fortune by Bill Dedman

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

When Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Bill Dedman noticed a property listing for a grand estate that had been unoccupied for nearly sixty years, he stumbled into one of the most surprising American stories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Empty Mansions is a rich tale of wealth and loss, complete with copper barons, Gilded Age opulence, and backdoor politics. At its heart is a reclusive 104-year-old heiress named Huguette Clark. Dedman has collaborated with Huguette's cousin, Paul Clark Newell, Jr., one of the few relatives to have had frequent conversations with her, to tell a fairy tale in reverse: the bright, talented daughter who is born into an almost royal family of amazing wealth and privilege, yet who secrets herself away from the outside world. Empty Mansions reveals a complete picture of the enigmatic Huguette Clark, heiress to one of the greatest fortunes in American history, a woman who had not been photographed in public since the 1920s. (catalog summary)

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06/12/2017 - 8:48am
A Hidden Genius Unfolds in Our Big Library Read

From June 12-26, OverDrive's Big Library Read is back with the eBook format of The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict. 

Mitza Maric has always been a little different from other girls. Most twenty-year-olds are wives by now, not studying physics at an elite Zurich university with only male students trying to outdo her clever calculations. But Mitza is smart enough to know that, for her, math is an easier path than marriage. And then fellow student Albert Einstein takes an interest in her, and the world turns sideways. Theirs becomes a partnership of the mind and of the heart, but there might not be room for more than one genius in a marriage. This is the story of Einstein’s wife, a brilliant physicist in her own right, whose contribution to the special theory of relativity is hotly debated and may have been inspired by her own profound and very personal insight.

During the Big Library Read, the digital version of this book will be available to all library customers to download for free, with no holds. The Other Einstein can be read on major computers and devices. Like all of our eBooks, it will automatically expire at the end of the lending period, so there are never any late fees. 

Read a sample of The Other Einstein below, read an interview with the author, or download the reading group guide for more. 

05/30/2017 - 2:49am
The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures

For the better part of the 20th century, the card catalog stood as a gateway to the wonders of the library. In The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures, the Library of Congress celebrates the importance of the card catalog throughout library history.

The card catalog is seen as one of the most versatile and durable organizational scheme developed throughout history. It is the map to go to if you want to navigate your way through the vast wilderness of books. Although the beginnings of the card catalog started off slowly, it now covers every subject, from ancient to modern history, in libraries around the world. Peter Devereaux, writer-editor for the Library of Congress, notes that the catalog is a "tangible example of humanity's effort to establish and preserve the possibility of order."

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