Science & Nature

09/17/2015 - 2:56am
The Skunk by Mac Barnett and Illustrated by Patrick McDonnell

The Skunk shows up on a man's doorstep just as he is leaving for a night at the opera. Careful not to disturb the creature, the man quietly sneaks around his doorstep and begins walking. The skunk follows.

07/23/2015 - 12:30pm
The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and Jory John

The Terrible Two is a devious satire of middle school life where no one is spared. Miles Murphy was the prankster king at his old school, then he had to move to boring, old Yawnee Valley, famous for its abundant cow population. Miles is not happy. He will have to establish his pranking cred all over again.

07/22/2015 - 12:51pm
Winter Walk by Virginia Brimhall Snow

Looking for a book to share on a frosty day? Virginia Brimhall Snow’s Winter Walk is a lovely and informative stroll through nature’s quiet season. Grammy leads the children to all sorts of interesting discoveries. “Why is this tree green, Grammy, when others are brown?”

From the perspective of learning, this book is just right for young ones, and its design allows different ages to enjoy it. The figures of the people are only sketched, almost fading into the white backdrop as they make snow angels, fill a bird feeder, and have a snowball fight. But the images of what they notice and talk about are incredibly vivid: a cardinal, a snowshoe hare, a chickadee, a fox… and a gleaming icicle.

10/02/2014 - 3:00am
Bone by Bone by Sara Levine with illustrations by T.S. Spookytooth

Imagine if your only bones were a skull, vertebrae, and ribs. What kind of animal would you be? What kind of animal would you be if you didn’t have any bones at all? Find out in Bone by Bone, written by Sara Levine and illustrated by T.S. Spookytooth!

09/10/2015 - 2:13pm

If you're the caregiver for a school age child, then STEM is probably already a household word. An acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, STEM is a focused initiative in the nation's schools and ties in closely with the library's educational mission. Its origins lie with Congress’ America Competes Act, aptly named because when it comes to these subject areas, the consensus has been that our students are not prepared to do the STEM-related jobs we will need filled in the near future. 

09/12/2014 - 4:42pm
Homework Help at the Library

The library is an invaluable homework help resource even in the Google age. Need a tutor?  We provide HelpNow which offers live online tutors in all subjects for all ages. Writing a research paper? Librarians have favorite internet search engines too, but don’t forget specialized online research tools that you can access with your library card; some even provide full-text journal articles. Studying a foreign language or getting ready for an important test? We have online resources for those homework needs too!

07/22/2015 - 5:16pm
11 Experiments That Failed by Jenny Offill and Nancy Carpenter

11 Experiments That Failed is as hilarious as it is messy. Author Jenny Offill and artist Nancy Carpenter combine their talents as one young scientist stretches the limits of curiousity—and her mother's patience!

Offill tells her story through questions, hypotheses, and results, allowing the reader to fill in the narrative blanks. 

Question: Can a kid make it through the winter eating only snow and ketchup?

Hypothesis: Ketchup and snow are the only food groups a kid needs.

What Happened: Stomachache. Brain freeze. Love of ketchup wavering.

06/15/2014 - 6:29pm

One of children’s literature’s most beloved authors and illustrators was born in June. Bruce Degen created Jamberry and illustrated the hugely successful Magic School Bus series.

07/22/2015 - 5:08pm
On a Beam of Light by Jennifer Berne and Illustrated by Vladimir Radunsky

On a Beam of Light starts with a little boy who barely talked as a child, who got in trouble at school, and who was told he would never amount to anything. That boy was named Albert Einstein.

12/02/2013 - 3:56pm

Growing up with Books and Traveling the World

With a scientist/writer for a mother and a research physician for a father, it’s little wonder that Molly Bang grew up to be a writer and illustrator who would eventually make it her mission to create books that drawn children into the world of science. Her family kept a large library and would often give each other books illustrated by the famous Charles Rackham as gifts. Molly found these to be inspiring.

After she graduated from Wellesley College with a degree in French, Molly traveled to Japan to teach English at a university there for 18 months before returning to work on master’s degrees in Oriental studies. Then it was back overseas to illustrate health manuals for UNICEF, as well as Johns Hopkins and Harvard, working, among other places, in Calcutta and Bangladesh.


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