Science & Nature

08/25/2016 - 3:11pm
Fabulous Friday: Mad Scientist

Embrace your inner mad scientist! Summer may be over, but learning something new doesn't have to be boring. CRRL's Youth Services wants you to show off your scientific side with our Fabulous Friday: Mad Scientist class. Get hands-on experience with experiments and activities designed to bring out your inner chemist, inventor, or engineer. But be warned...side effects (such as having an awesome time) may occur. 

A STEM class for grades K - 6.

Friday, September 9, 4:30-5:15 at Headquarters Library and Porter Branch.

 

08/23/2016 - 12:03am
Nature Books for Young Children

Being outdoors in nature offers children endless possibilities to engage and stimulate their curiosity. If you can’t get your children outdoors for one reason or another, books are a great way to explore the wonders of nature further. Many children are keenly interested in animals and nature, and there are a nearly endless number of books for elementary-aged children and older where they can learn about plant and animal life.

05/19/2016 - 9:41am
Cover to When Green Becomes Tomatoes: Poems for All Seasons by Julie Fogliano; Pictures by Julie Morstad

may 20th
“enough already”
i whispered
to the clouds
(just loud enough
for the sun to overhear
but not enough to wake the rain)
“the strawberries are furious
and i think i just heard
even the roses sigh”

03/23/2016 - 3:09pm
Explore Your World with Adventure Packs

If you enjoy bird watching, looking at insects and animals up close, or taking hikes in the forest, then CRRL’s Adventure Packs are for you! Adventure Packs come in a variety of subjects ranging from local history to birds and butterflies.

02/24/2016 - 2:55pm
Winter Bees & Other Poems of the Cold by Joyce Sidman & Rick Allen

Joyce Sidman’s and Rick Allen’s Winter Bees & Other Poems expresses in verse the wonders of wintertime while teaching about what is going on while the world is frozen. The poems themselves are delightful for young readers as they look out at the forest through the animals’ eyes:

09/17/2015 - 2:56am
The Skunk by Mac Barnett and Illustrated by Patrick McDonnell

The Skunk shows up on a man's doorstep just as he is leaving for a night at the opera. Careful not to disturb the creature, the man quietly sneaks around his doorstep and begins walking. The skunk follows.

07/23/2015 - 12:30pm
The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and Jory John

The Terrible Two is a devious satire of middle school life where no one is spared. Miles Murphy was the prankster king at his old school, then he had to move to boring, old Yawnee Valley, famous for its abundant cow population. Miles is not happy. He will have to establish his pranking cred all over again.

07/22/2015 - 12:51pm
Winter Walk by Virginia Brimhall Snow

Looking for a book to share on a frosty day? Virginia Brimhall Snow’s Winter Walk is a lovely and informative stroll through nature’s quiet season. Grammy leads the children to all sorts of interesting discoveries. “Why is this tree green, Grammy, when others are brown?”

From the perspective of learning, this book is just right for young ones, and its design allows different ages to enjoy it. The figures of the people are only sketched, almost fading into the white backdrop as they make snow angels, fill a bird feeder, and have a snowball fight. But the images of what they notice and talk about are incredibly vivid: a cardinal, a snowshoe hare, a chickadee, a fox… and a gleaming icicle.

10/02/2014 - 3:00am
Bone by Bone by Sara Levine with illustrations by T.S. Spookytooth

Imagine if your only bones were a skull, vertebrae, and ribs. What kind of animal would you be? What kind of animal would you be if you didn’t have any bones at all? Find out in Bone by Bone, written by Sara Levine and illustrated by T.S. Spookytooth!

09/10/2015 - 2:13pm

If you're the caregiver for a school age child, then STEM is probably already a household word. An acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, STEM is a focused initiative in the nation's schools and ties in closely with the library's educational mission. Its origins lie with Congress’ America Competes Act, aptly named because when it comes to these subject areas, the consensus has been that our students are not prepared to do the STEM-related jobs we will need filled in the near future. 

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