History & Politics

08/03/2016 - 9:43am
Heroines of Mercy Street: The Real Nurses of the Civil War

Pamela J. Toler’s Heroines of Mercy Street is the true history behind the popular PBS series set in occupied Alexandria, Virginia, during the Civil War. Caveat here: I did read the book before watching a single episode. I found Toler’s narrative to be engaging and an excellent window to the time. With wildly varying levels of training (many, such as Louisa May Alcott, had only nursed family patients while another trained with celebrated British nurse Florence Nightingale), they all had a sense of duty and enthusiasm for the job that did not wane as the war ground on—though it did exhaust them and occasionally kill them.

08/09/2016 - 3:03pm

The public is invited to a talk on "Walking in This World: Native American Social Issues Yesterday and Today," presented by Dr. Karenne Wood at Headquarters Library on Thursday, August 11, at 7:00.

Dr. Wood is a member of the Monacan Indian Nation and Director of Virginia Indian Programs at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. This talk is being held in conjunction with the Native Voices: Native Peoples' Concepts of Health and Illness exhibition, on display through August. Dr. Wood will examine American Indian ways of living in sustainable communities, the administration of justice and peacekeeping, the important roles of women in society, and how children were viewed.  

07/16/2016 - 1:41pm
A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe

What would really happen if thousands of people died in a city every day from an illness? Even worse, a city with few to no hospitals and only a bare bones emergency infrastructure? When the illness might leave no mark on a person until he or she fell over dead in front of you? And that’s when you realize, you have been exposed and could be next. What would you do?

07/08/2016 - 9:45am
Verifying Native American Ancestry through DNA Testing

“Great-Grandma said we have an Indian princess in the family . . . . “  

Since DNA testing for genealogy began nearly 20 years ago, we have made many leaps and bounds with how, when, and why it can be used. Many Americans have a family story that features the marriage of a Native American into the lineage. Frequently, these stories make us wonder about who we are on the inside.

On Tuesday, August 2, at 7:00, Shannon Combs-Bennett, biologist and genealogist, will discuss what DNA testing could tell you about your ancestry, as well as which test you may want to take to verify your genealogy. An author and frequent lecturer on genealogy, Shannon will present her talk in support of the library’s Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Wellness exhibition.

04/13/2016 - 12:51pm
In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Voyage of the U.S.S. Jeannette by Hampton Sides

It’s 1879, and Captain De Long and his 32 men receive quite the send-off on their way to explore the Arctic. Financed by an eccentric playboy newspaper publisher, they are as prepared as possible for the grueling years of making camp on ice floes, as well as winters of darkness and aching loneliness. Hampton Sides’ In the Kingdom of Ice sets down their story of trying to be the first to reach the North Pole—which they and much of the scientific community believe to be a warm sea.

03/28/2016 - 2:05pm
The Virginiana Room

A Welcome from Library Director Martha Hutzel:

“The CRRL is very happy to offer to the community a more spacious and attractive local genealogy room, complete with historical records, beautiful, museum-quality historical wall panels, an attractive work space and free computers and databases for research. Please stop by any time we are open!"
 

01/26/2016 - 9:45am
The Atlas of Mysterious Places edited by Jennifer Westwood

The Atlas of Mysterious Places is filled with wonder, adventure, and amazing photographs. A perfect book for an armchair explorer and dreamer, especially during these winter nights, it conjures landscapes of civilizations waiting to be rediscovered.

01/12/2016 - 12:03pm
The Lindberghs: First Couple of the Air

Most people today have heard of Charles Lindbergh, the first man to fly non-stop over the Atlantic Ocean. Fewer people these days are familiar with Anne Morrow Lindbergh, his wife, but, in the mid-20th century, they were both well-known in America and abroad.  

Pages

Subscribe to History & Politics