Early Closing: The Headquarters Library will close at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, December 5, due to street closures for the Christmas Parade.


11/17/2015 - 2:32pm
Image of alert newborn being held

When I was fresh out of college and a first year teacher, I was very interested in applying all my knowledge, both practical and book-learned. The paraprofessional who worked with me in my classroom once joked, “When you have kids of your own, you’re going to read every book about raising kids and then find out that they can’t really tell you anything!!” Well, many years later, her words have come true . . . but just partially. With the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, I have access to hundreds of books on child-rearing—all I have to do is place a hold.

07/03/2015 - 4:15pm
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolver: Follows the author's family's efforts to live on locally- and home-grown foods, an endeavor through which they learned lighthearted truths about food production and the connection between health and diet.

If you enjoyed this book, you may also like the following titles:

The Dirty Life by Kristin Kimball
Single, thirtysomething, working as a writer in New York City, Kristin Kimball was living life as an adventure. But she was beginning to feel a sense of longing for a family and for home. When she interviewed a dynamic young farmer, her world changed. (catalog description)


In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan
Humans used to know how to eat well but the balanced dietary lessons that were once passed down through generations have been confused and distorted by food industry marketers, nutritional scientists, and journalists. As a result, we face today a complex culinary landscape dense with bad advice and foods that are not "real." (catalog description)

06/30/2015 - 2:02am
The Monster of Florence by Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi

In The Monster of Florence, Douglas Preston recounts Mario Spezi’s role in the hunt for a serial killer. Working as a reporter, Spezi, though he didn’t know it at the time, found himself in the midst of a real-life thriller. Over the years, dozens of couples would be found murdered throughout the Italian countryside. Though the investigation spanned decades, and a variety of suspects and leads were examined, the killer was never discovered.

06/04/2015 - 1:43pm
Marvel Comics: The Untold Story by Sean Howe
With the release of the recent Avengers movie, superhero comics are more prominent than ever, particularly the characters created by Marvel Comics. But the world of comics can be a complicated and confusing one, and the average fan may find it difficult to catch up. Luckily, Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, by Sean Howe, makes it easy to brush up on comics knowledge in an entertaining way. The book contains everything the uninitiated will need to get up to speed, as well as some firsthand accounts that may still be unfamiliar to longtime fans.

02/10/2015 - 2:32am
America’s Most Haunted: The Secrets of Famous Paranormal Places by Theresa Argie and Eric Olsen

Dubbed “The Haunted Housewife,” author Theresa Argie loves the paranormal. Since her first scary experience as a child, her quest has been to find the most haunted places across the country. With journalist Eric Olsen, Argie gives readers first-person accounts of some of the scariest places in the United States.    

12/08/2014 - 4:23pm
The Beats: A Graphic History by Harvey Pekar and Ed Piskor

“...the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.” - Jack Kerouac's On the Road 

The Beats: A Graphic History tackles the generation of post-World War II writers who revealed an untold side of America while pushing censors' boundaries with their writing style.

07/22/2015 - 1:31pm
The Foxfire Book

Anybody interested in DIY projects or maker culture or just getting back to basics should take a gander at the Foxfire series of books. Beginning in the late 60s and continuing on through today, a class at a rural Georgia high school decided to take a different tack at English class and create a magazine.

They had no money so the venture needed to pay for itself. As there was little market for poetry or short stories found in ordinary high school magazines, they decided to print folklore and folk ways gathered from people in their own community. It was the beginning of something amazing.

07/24/2015 - 4:49pm
Hip Hop Family Tree by Ed Piskor

"Stepping in a rhythm to a Kurtis Blow. 
Who needs to think when your feet just go?"

                                                Tom Tom Club - The Genius of Love

Ed Piskor cannot rap or dance. He is no good with turntables or sampling. What Piskor can do is draw, which is why Hip Hop Family Tree is such an important testament to honoring the innovators and pioneers of the culture.

02/26/2014 - 3:02am
Born Standing Up by Steve Martin

In Born Standing Up, Steve Martin looks back at his comedy career in a way that few artists are able to do. He not only has succeeded in his craft, he also has the luxury of being able to step back from the act and make sense of just what it was all about.

In the 1970's and 80's, Martin attained a kind of success usually reserved for rock stars. He filled up arenas and released number one albums, but  Martin is quick to point out that this was no overnight sensation. He spent his youth trying to break into the entertainment business by working at Disneyland and writing for the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour.


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