Health, Mind & Body

12/01/2016 - 3:14pm
When the Holidays Aren’t So Merry and Bright…

Whether you’re a younger person who has recently lost a parent or grandparent, someone missing the comforting presence of a life partner or child, or, yes, one of those missing dear pets, the holidays can be hard. Something—someone is missing. There’s a hole in your heart. You know why. Oh, you know why. You don’t hear the sparkling music at all, or you do and find it forced and irritating. The smoke of memory casts a pall on this year’s festivities. It is not the same. It will never be the same. It can be good eventually, but, for right now, you do need to take time for yourself.

11/15/2016 - 2:25am
Soup Cleanse Cookbook: Embrace a Better Body and a Healthier You With the Weekly Soup Plan

A soup cleanse is a modern alternative for expelling antioxidants from your body. In Nicole Centeno’s Soup Cleanse Cookbook: Embrace a Better Body and a Healthier You With the Weekly Soup Plan, you can establish a meal plan yourself with delicious and nutritious soup recipes that are all plant-based.

11/10/2016 - 2:23am
Cover to Day & Overnight Hikes: Shenandoah National Park

What are you doing reading this article? Go take a hike! No, seriously. Take a Hike Day is on November 17, so you should go take a hike. Not only is Virginia filled with a variety of trails for all levels of hikers and all interests, but local trails are plentiful, too.

11/02/2016 - 2:09am
Forgotten Ways for Modern Days: Kitchen Cures and Household Lore for A Natural Home and Garden

In Forgotten Ways for Modern Days, Rachelle Blondel (coauthor of Granny Chic) offers an array of natural household recipes to maintain a nontoxic household environment.

Blondel emphasizes that having a lifestyle that is free from harsh cleaning products improves your life as it flows day to day. When you use these recipes, there is no risk for anyone in your family (children and pets included) will inhale toxic chemicals.

11/01/2016 - 7:05am
CRRL Guest Picks: Kickshaw's Kathy Craddock

"I certainly never imagined that when I opened Nourishing Traditions at our local library almost nine years ago that in less than a decade I would open the doors to a natural foods store, but I am certainly glad that I did."  — Kathy Craddock, owner of Kickshaws Downtown and Kickshaws Kitchen

Kathy lives in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, with her husband, two kids, chickens and three dogs. She and her husband, Richard, own Kickshaws Downtown Market and Kickshaws Kitchen in downtown Fredericksburg, focusing on local, organic products and foods for special dietary needs. Here, she shares her thoughts on some of her favorite books:

10/20/2016 - 3:33pm

I recently had to get 12 stitches in my leg. It was mesmerizing to watch! But for some reason, nobody wanted to see the pictures I took of the bloody gash or the resulting row of neat black stitches.

I grew up with a nurse mom and a nuclear physicist dad, so our dinnertime conversations were often scientific discourse about what happened in surgery or the emergency room. I didn't realize that this wasn't normal until I horrified some of my playmates with stories they found unbearably gruesome.

In college, I was a serials check-in clerk for the medical library and was fascinated by some of the medical journals. I couldn't wait to look at the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report!

If you find medical history fascinating, look at some of the books on my Medical Mysteries and Maladies booklist.  

09/20/2016 - 12:23am
Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

After graduating with honors from Emory University, Christopher Johnson McCandless left his suburban home in Annandale, Virginia, behind to pursue an odyssey to the Stampede Trail in Alaska.

McCandless gave up his $25,000 college grant to charity and began traveling across the Western United States. To the disappointment of his family back home, he ceased all communication with them and abandoned his 1982 Datsun after a flash flood somewhere in the Midwest.

09/06/2016 - 4:13pm
If you like The Four-Hour Work Week by Timothy Ferris
This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.
 
The Four-hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich by Timothy Ferriss
This step-by-step guide to luxury lifestyle design teaches: how Tim went from $40,000 per year and 80 hours per week to $40,000 per month and 4 hours per week; how to outsource your life to overseas virtual assistants for $5 per hour and do whatever you want; how blue-chip escape artists travel the world without quitting their jobs; how to eliminate 50% of your work in 48 hours using the principles of a forgotten Italian economist; how to trade a long-haul career for short work bursts and frequent "mini-retirements." (catalog summary)
 
Here are similar books for those interested in either retiring younger or for those interested in working less, but making more:


Balancing the Big Life: Finding Happiness in Work, Family & Life by Miriam Liss
We can obtain happiness for ourselves through a better evaluation of what we want from ourselves, our families, our jobs, and each other. Determining a 50/50 division of labor around the house may not be the thing that works for everyone. Working from home or not at all may not be the thing to bring us satisfaction, but learning what studies show and how to feel balanced and make those decisions to bring balance is crucial. The authors argue that people can find balance in their roles by doing things in moderation. Although being engaged in both parenting and work is good for well-being, people can avoid the pitfalls of over-parenting and over-working. They show that balance can come from a meaningful consideration of what happiness and contentedness mean to us as individuals, and how best to achieve our goals within the limitations of our current circumstances. They illustrate that balance is not simply an individual problem. Social issues such as the lack of parental leave, flexible work schedules, and affordable, high quality child care make balance difficult. With attention now on the issue, they argue that it’s time men and women advocate for better services and better opportunities to achieve balance, happiness, and success in all their roles. (catalog summary)
 




Born for This: How to Find the Work You Were Meant to Do
by Chris Guillebeau
Through inspiring stories of those who have successfully landed their dream career, as well as actionable tools, exercises, and thought experiments, he'll guide you through today's vast menu of career options to discover the work perfectly suited to your unique interests, skills, and experiences. (catalog summary)
 
 
 
09/06/2016 - 12:04pm
If You Like Drop City by T.C. Boyle

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Drop City by T.C. Boyle
It is 1970, and a down-at-the-heels California commune has decided to relocate to the last frontier--the unforgiving landscape of interior Alaska--in the ultimate expression of going back to the land. The novel opposes two groups of characters: Sess Harder, his wife Pamela, and other young Alaskans who are already homesteading in the wilderness and the brothers and sisters of Drop City, who, despite their devotion to peace, free love, and the simple life, find their commune riven by tensions. As these two communities collide, their alliances shift and unexpected friendships and dangerous enmities are born as everyone struggles with the bare essentials of life: love, nourishment, and a roof over one's head. (catalog summary)

If you like Drop City, you may also find these stories of folks living outside of society are appealing:  
 

 

Arcadia by Lauren Groff
Follows the fortunes of Bit and the commune his parents helped to create. A group of like-minded folks comes together to create a utopia in Arcadia. Despite everyone’s best intentions, the commune falls apart under the strain of privation and a self-serving leader who can’t live up to his own ideals. Bit is ill-prepared for the real world, but manages to make his way until a flu pandemic threatens the human race. (catalog summary)

 

 

 

Boonville by Robert Mailer Anderson
Surrounded by misfits, rednecks, and counterculture burnouts, John Gibson--the reluctant heir of an alcoholic grandmother--and Sarah McKay--a commune-reared "hippie-by-association"--search for self and community in the hole-of-a-town Boonville. As they try to assemble from the late-twentieth-century jumble of life the facts of sexuality, love, and death, and face the possibility of an existence without God, John and Sarah learn what happens when they dare to try to make art from their lives. (catalog summary)

 

 

08/18/2016 - 11:38am
If you like Ishmael by Daniel Quinn

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
The narrator of this extraordinary tale is a man in search for truth. He answers an ad in a local newspaper from a teacher looking for serious pupils, only to find himself alone in an abandoned office with a full-grown gorilla who is nibbling delicately on a slender branch. "You are the teacher?" he asks incredulously. "I am the teacher," the gorilla replies. Ishmael is a creature of immense wisdom and he has a story to tell, one that no other human being has ever heard. It is a story that extends backward and forward over the lifespan of the earth from the birth of time to a future there is still time save. Like all great teachers, Ishmael refuses to make the lesson easy; he demands the final illumination to come from within ourselves. Is it man's destiny to rule the world? Or is it a higher destiny possible for him-- one more wonderful than he has ever imagined? (catalog summary)
 

If you like Ishmael, try these other titles:


The Culture of Make Believe
by Derrick Jensen
Derrick Jensen takes no prisoners in "The Culture of Make Believe," his brilliant and eagerly awaited follow-up to his powerful and lyrical "A Language Older Than Words," What begins as an exploration of the lines of thought and experience that run between the massive lynchings in early twentieth-century America to today's death squads in South America soon explodes into an examination of the very heart of our civilization. "The Culture of Make Believe" is a book that is as impeccably researched as it is moving, with conclusions as far-reaching as they are shocking. (catalog summary)


 



Ecotopia: The Notebooks and Reports of William Weston
by Ernest Callenbach
A novel both timely and prophetic, Ernest Callenbach's Ecotopia is a hopeful antidote to the environmental concerns of today, set in an ecologically sound future society. Hailed by the Los Angeles Times as the "newest name after Wells, Verne, Huxley, and Orwell," Callenbach offers a visionary blueprint for the survival of our planet . . . and our future. (catalog summary)

 


 

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