Health, Mind & Body

10/27/2014 - 12:53pm
CRRL Health: Ebola Resources

A History of Ebola

Ebola was first recorded in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sudan where it infected about 600 people.  Mortality rates were frighteningly high, but the disease was contained and dropped out of sight until 1995 when some 300 cases showed up again in the Democratic Republic of Congo.  From 2000-2001, during a large outbreak in Uganda, the disease took a couple of hundred lives.

08/16/2014 - 3:00am
SeniorNavigator E-Quicktip: National Immunization Month

Vaccinations can save your life. As we get older, immune systems tend to weaken over time, putting us at higher risk for certain diseases. Older adults are especially vulnerable to certain diseases, such as influenza and pneumonia. There is no better time than the present to follow-up with your doctor and make sure you have all the shots you need. Despite the common misconception, vaccinations are needed throughout your life—not just when you are a child.

01/07/2014 - 3:02am
Delete the Danger: Stop Smoking Now

From our friends at SeniorNavigator, here are six proven tips and resources that have helped thousands of people give up smoking for good:

07/22/2015 - 4:59pm
The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson

Jon Ronson sees insanity all around him. Partially that is because as a journalist he is drawn to write stories in which people engage in erratic behavior. It is also because he has learned The Psychopath Test, and he cannot stop administering the 20-point checklist to everyone around him.

Item 1: Glibness/superficial charm

Item 2: Grandiose sense of self-worth

Item 3: Need for stimulation/proneness to boredom

Item 4: Pathological lying

And, so on. From a rude concierge at a hotel to the CEO of a giant corporation, no matter where Ronson looks, everything's coming up psycho.

10/13/2014 - 3:18pm
Woman using a laptop

Learn how the new federal health care law affects you at HealthCare.gov, the official site of the Health Insurance Marketplace. Created under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Health Insurance Marketplace is designed to help you find health coverage that fits your budget and meets your needs.

Open enrollment for health insurance begins on October 1, 2013, with coverage starting as soon as January 1, 2014. With one simple application, you can compare all the plans available to you and check whether you qualify for free or low-cost coverage. You may enroll online, by mail, or in person. To apply and enroll online, or to print an application form to mail in, visit HealthCare.gov. Telephone assistance is available 24/7 to help you complete your application. Call 1-800-318-2596.  For in-person assistance, your librarian can refer you to the Health Insurance Marketplace Navigator and Certified Application Counselors for your locale.

06/05/2013 - 3:31am
Have You Seen Marie? cover

Have You Seen Marie? is a picture book, but it is aimed at adults. The author and illustrator created it as an attempt to help them deal with their grief, for each of them has lost a parent. 

The story is about Sandra Cisneros who suffered from depression after her mother’s death. Her doctor encouraged the author to take antidepressants, but she resisted taking medication. Her friend came to visit her and while there lost her cat, Marie. The act of trying to find her friend’s cat forced Cisneros out of the house and into the world again in order to help her friend. This picture book introduces all of her colorful neighbors as she tries to find Marie.

01/28/2013 - 1:31pm
Virginia Breast Cancer Foundation Grant

The library has new books on breast cancer, thanks to a grant from the Virginia Breast Cancer Foundation.  The VBCF, founded in 1991, is a nonprofit organization “committed to the eradication of breast cancer through education and advocacy.”  For more information, visit their website at www.vbcf.org, or call 800-345-VBCF.

Check out a few of our new titles:

Betty Crocker Living with Cancer Cookbook by Betty Crocker
Over 130 recipes designed specifically for the cancer patient.  Also includes “uplifting quotes, anecdotes, and practical tips from cancer survivors.”  (catalog summary)

Breast Cancer:  What You Need to Know--Now
A concise but comprehensive guide from the American Cancer Society.

08/22/2012 - 3:31am
French Kids Eat Everything

All it takes is one picky toddler to make parents pull their hair out at the dinner table. If there is one topic that worries us the most, it’s our children’s health and what they’re eating (or not!). As a result, there are countless books on the market touting the best way to get your kids to eat more foods. From The Sneaky Chef, which advocates putting veggie purees in brownies, to 201 Healthy Smoothies and Juices for Kids, to What Chefs Feed Their Kids where chefs share their gourmet secrets, there are more than 60 titles to choose from just in our library system. Parents who are at a loss as to how to get their littlest ones (and often, their big ones!) interested in a plate of carrots can easily become overwhelmed with the advice. With the additional goals of trying to feed families with increasingly less time and high grocery bills, it’s enough to make many of us revert to pasta every night of the week.

The newest addition to the collection, however, might just change not only how you feed your kids, but also yourself. French Kids Eat Everything by Karen Le Billon is the story of one Canadian mother who moved her young family back to her husband’s native Brittany, on the coast of France. As you can surmise by the title, she discovered why French kids associate chocolate cake with pleasure, not guilt, and why they have astonishing lower rates of childhood obesity (20% in America, just 3% in France (p. 140)). She discovered why nearly half of French children eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables each day, while barely ten percent of their American counterparts struggle to eat the same amount (p. 117). Even their daycare menus resemble gourmet menus. One day’s lunch at her daughter’s preschool was listed as: beet salad bolognaise, roast turkey with fine flageolet beans, goat cheese buchette, and organic pear compote (p. 36). “By the time they are two years old,” Le Billon discovered, “most French kids have tried (and eaten) more foods than many American adults” (p. 120).

06/20/2012 - 2:14pm
SENIORNAVIGATOR E-QUICKTIP: Long-Distance Caregiving

Do any of these situations sound familiar to you?

-The phone rings at 10 p.m. notifying you that your father has fallen and rushed to the hospital with a probable broken hip.

-You call your mother several times one afternoon and evening without any answer.

-Your aunt’s neighbor calls you to tell you that the papers are piling up on the front doorstep over the past week and she is not answering the door.

Whether you live an hour away or across the country, long-distance caregiving can be a challenge for many families.

06/06/2012 - 8:45am
Happy for No Reason by Marci Shimoff

“I’ll be happy when…I win the lottery. Snag my dream job. Lose that last ten pounds.” Does that sound familiar? Marci Shimoff in Happy for No Reason points out the flaws in this type of thinking and presents practical advice for living a life of happiness, regardless of your circumstances.  Shimoff herself thought she had achieved the American Dream as a successful, published author married to a loving husband and living in a beautiful home. But she, too, felt something was missing from her life. Through her research and her interviews of the “Happy 100,” Shimoff discovers that happiness is derived from within and offers the following seven steps to creating your own happiness:

1. Take Ownership of Your Happiness
2. Don’t Believe Everything You Think
3. Let Love Lead
4. Make Your Cells Happy
5. Plug Yourself Into Spirit
6. Live a Life Inspired by Purpose
7. Cultivate Nourishing Relationships

So, why should you read this book now that I’ve given away Shimoff’s seven steps? Because although these steps are the basics of Shimoff’s plan, her explanations and advice are well worth reading, to the point where I wanted to dog-ear the book’s pages (as it was a library book, I did not).  Even the new-age concept of the Law of Attraction had me thinking “what if it is true?” and “what do I have to lose?”

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