Movies

10/04/2016 - 12:32am
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Rachel Watson is just a girl on the train.

She takes the same London commuter train into work almost daily. She passes the same tiny suburbs on the tracks—the same suburbs she used to live in with her ex-husband, Tom.

Occasionally, she sees Tom and his new wife Anna with their new baby, enjoying a stroll in the afternoons. But more often than not, she directs all of her attention to a house down the street from her old abode, one that houses a young couple who she finds herself obsessing over.

09/22/2016 - 9:51am
If You Like The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form, and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Every day, Rachel takes the same London commuter train and passes the same suburban scenery, yet one house catches her eye—mainly because of the married couple she glimpses living there. This leads Rachel to conjure up an entire dream life for this husband and wife, even naming them and giving them make-believe careers. Rachel's life has been spiraling downward, and her fantasy about this couple gives her a little joy. But all is not what it seems, and Rachel is soon embroiled in a murderous thriller. (Library Journal)
 

If you enjoyed The Girl on the Train, you may like the following novels:
 


Before I Go to Sleep
by S.J. Watson
Christine Lucas suffers from a rare form of amnesia as the result of a vaguely defined accident. Each night as she sleeps, her near-term memory is wiped clean, and she awakens knowing little about who she is, where she is, or with whom she lives. Every day her husband, Ben, shares with her the same carefully rehearsed story of their long marriage and gently encourages her struggle to remember. She keeps a journal at the recommendation of her doctor and reads it each morning. As the journal grows, Christine begins to suspect that Ben is not telling her the complete truth about her accident, their son Adam, her successful career as a novelist, or the fire that destroyed the collection of family photos that might help her remember. (Library Journal)
 

 

 

The Disappearance of Emily Marr by Louise Candlish (eAudio)
When Tabby Dewhurst arrives heartbroken and penniless on a picturesque, windswept island off the coast of France, her luck appears to change when she overhears a villager repeating aloud the access code to her front door. Hardly believing her own actions, Tabby waits for the woman to leave and then lets herself into the house. And so she enters the strange, hidden world of Emily Marr—or so her new friend introduces herself. Soon, however, Tabby forms suspicions about her new friend, suspicions that lead her back to England and to revelations that will have explosive consequences for both of them. (catalog summary)


 

07/27/2016 - 12:56pm
The Unhappy Ending

There should be a shelf in the library with yellow caution tape labeled WARNING, UNHAPPY ENDINGS and UNHAPPILY EVER AFTER. Reach for a book from that shelf, and you’ll need your Puffs Plus tissues. Authors have the power of the pen, so why end on an unhappy note with disaster, calamity, catastrophe, cataclysm, misfortune, mishap, blow, trial, tribulation, affliction, adversity, and death?

08/02/2017 - 3:19pm
If you liked The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown 
While in Paris on business, Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: the elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum. Near the body, police have found a baffling cipher. While working to solve the enigmatic riddle, Langdon is stunned to discover it leads to a trail of clues hidden in the works of Da Vinci—clues visible for all to see—yet ingeniously disguised by the painter. Langdon joins forces with a gifted French cryptologist, Sophie Neveu, and learns the late curator was involved in the Priory of Sion—an actual secret society whose members included Sir Isaac Newton, Botticelli, Victor Hugo, and Da Vinci, among others. In a breathless race through Paris, London, and beyond, Langdon and Neveu match wits with a faceless powerbroker who seems to anticipate their every move. Unless Langdon and Neveu can decipher the labyrinthine puzzle in time, the Priory's ancient secret—and an explosive historical truth—will be lost forever. (catalog summary)

If you liked The Da Vinci Code read the other Robert Langdon novels:

Angels and Demons, Book 2The Lost Symbol, Book 3 Inferno, Book 4

If you enjoyed the Robert Langdon series, you may also like these titles:

The Codex by Douglas Preston

The Codex
by Douglas Preston

"Greetings from the dead," declares Maxwell Broadbent on the videotape he left behind after his mysterious disappearance. A notorious treasure hunter and tomb robber, Broadbent accumulated over a half a billion dollars' worth of priceless art, gems, and artifacts before vanishing--along with his entire collection--from his mansion in New Mexico. At first, robbery is suspected, but the truth proves far stranger: as a final challenge to his three sons, Broadbent has buried himself and his treasure somewhere in the world, hidden away like an ancient Egyptian pharaoh. If the sons wish to claim their fabulous inheritance, they must find their father's carefully concealed tomb. (from the publisher)

 

06/15/2016 - 4:40pm
Porter’s Saturday Matinee Movie: The Secret Garden

Mary Lennox arrives at Misselthwaite Manor in the dead of winter, an angry orphan with serious trust issues. Everything at the Yorkshire estate seems closed off to her. And there are secrets. A mysterious cousin, a distant uncle, and a separate, walled-off garden—to which she’s found the key.

05/16/2016 - 9:45am
Mel Gibson in Hamlet

In Shakespeare for Beginners, I listed various books and resources I like to use to help in reading Shakespeare’s plays. However, one of the best accompaniments to reading his plays is watching one or more of the movies or stage productions.  

When I studied Shakespeare in college, one of the requirements of the class was to watch each of the plays we were studying. Although I had seen a couple of live productions, I had never seen a Shakespeare film, but since it was required, I dutifully checked out my first Shakespeare video, Richard II. I was entranced. With facial expressions, props, costumes, and even the way the actors said their parts, I was drawn into the action of the play even more than when I had read it.

05/06/2016 - 2:36pm
CRRL Guest Picks: Film Expert Gary Olsen

Gary Olsen gives monthly film lectures at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library on the best film directors of all time. His previous lecture series on the Academy Awards' best pictures drew upon his extensive knowledge of film and cinema history.

07/22/2015 - 5:25pm
I Wear the Black Hat by Chuck Klosterman

I Wear the Black Hat is Chuck Klosterman's sixth book of cultural essays and the first one to explore villainy in all of its forms. 

08/28/2014 - 5:00pm
Descriptive Video symbol

Did you know that the Central Rappahannock Regional Library has a large collection of popular descriptive videos? These are movies with audio descriptions of the actions taking place on the screen in addition to the standard audio tracks. We think you’ll be very pleased with the size and scope of this growing collection, most of which are on DVD.

07/22/2015 - 5:03pm
Lapsed Catholics and Stray Bullets: The Works of Martin McDonagh

For the past two decades, Martin McDonagh has established himself as a sensational writer of emotional disturbance and darkly funny exchanges in his Irish-set plays and crime-focused films. He may not be a household name, but that name already has an Academy Award and several Tony nominations under its belt. We have a number of his works in the collection worth recommending.

 

Written in the mid-Nineties, The Beauty Queen of Leenane and Other Plays offers a trilogy of stories centered around the same town and immediately shows McDonagh's gifts for cleverly inane banter and simmering tensions.

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