Humor

Spaceheadz by Jon Scieszka

Spaceheadz by Jon Scieszka

Michael K. already has a few strikes against him. He's a new kid at a new school in a new town, but did he really have to get stuck sitting next to the two weirdest kids in the classroom? The girl, Jennifer, is halfway through eating her pencil when the boy, Bob, tells Michael that the two of them aren't human. They are Spaceheadz.

Bob, Jennifer, and the hamster, Major Fluffy, are on an intergalatic mission to save Earth. They must do this by recruiting 3.14 million Earthlings as Spaceheadz, and they think Michael K. is the person to help them get the job done.

Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin and illustrated by Daniel Salmieri

Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin and illustrated by Daniel Salmieri

Dragons Love Tacos! The word is out. These mystical creatures have a weak spot for Mexican cuisine. They want it all: really big, gigantic tacos and tiny, little baby tacos. Dragons adore them. But, why?

Adventure Time Comics by Ryan North

Adventure Time Comics by Ryan North

Adventure Time is a comic book adaptation of the popular Cartoon Network series. In the past four years, the show has found a sizable and devoted audience. The brainchild of Pendleton Ward, the cartoon appeals to both children and adults through goofy humor, surreal visuals, and rather sophisticated storylines involving its main characters Jake the Dog and Finn the Human.

Fortunately, the Milk by Neil Gaiman; Illustrated by Skottie Young

Fortunately, the Milk by Neil Gaiman

How far would you go to make sure you had milk in your refrigerator? Might you outsmart a spaceship full of aliens looking to remodel your planet? Would you dare face off against bloodthirsty pirates? How about climbing into a time-traveling hot air balloon invented by a genius stegosaurus? Fortunately, the Milk, by Neil Gaiman has these things and so much more. 

Secret Pizza Party by Adam Rubin and Daniel Salmieri

Secret Pizza Party by Adam Rubin and Daniel Salmieri

If there is one universal truth in life, it's that everyone loves pizza, even raccoons. One raccoon in particular is obsessed with pizza. All he wants is a Secret Pizza Party.

He stands outside the pizza parlor, eyes locked on the gooey, cheesy slices. Nothing can break him away from that desire, except for the owner, who chases him with a broom. A secret pizza party would be oh-so-much better. 

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps by Mordicai Gerstein

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 2

Plant sunflowers on the Moon? What a great idea! Now, how can we get there? Why, a bicycle of course!

Have you ever looked at the Moon and thought it looked sad? It’s all by its lonesome and nothing lives there. For one young boy his sole mission is to cheer up the Moon. How does he plan to cheer up the moon? By planting sunflowers! In the picture book How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps, author Mordicai Gerstein has laid out a plan for anyone to follow to reach the Moon. NASA hasn’t even thought of it! All you will need is a bicycle, a huge slingshot, an extremely long garden hose, and a spacesuit, size extra small, from NASA. Sounds easy, right? Have you gotten permission from your parents? Uh, oh, that could be the most difficult part of this brilliant plan.

The Tales of Olga da Polga by Michael Bond

The Tales of Olga da Polga by Michael Bond

The Tales of Olga da Polga, by Michael Bond—creator of the Paddington Bear books, features a feisty, queenly, and imaginative guinea pig who leaves the dull life of an English pet shop to go live with her own “Sawdust People” in “a house with legs” in their garden. For another guinea pig, it would be just a sensible, comfortable life change, but Olga is not just another guinea pig.

My New Teacher and Me! by Al Yankovic

My New Teacher and Me! by Al Yankovic

Getting ready for back-to-school, but not ready to pack away the fun? Al Yankovic’s My New Teacher and Me! is as welcome for the last weeks of summer as an ice cream truck after a long, hot day at the pool.  In this rollicking story, Mr. Booth’s strict rules have met their match in Billy, a bright-eyed boy who shows up for the first day of class with a wide-open imagination. Disapproving Mr. Booth spots the dirt on Billy’s shirt immediately! Billy quickly—and politely—tells him how that came to be:

“I was digging to China out in my backyard.

And I almost was there when—I hit something hard!

Well, I dug, and I dug, and I dug a bit more

And discovered the skull of a real dinosaur!

“And I would have cleaned up, sir, but hey, I’m no fool—

I just couldn’t be late on the first day of school!”

Bow-tied and sour, Mr. Booth says his tale sounds highly unlikely, but as Billy points out, “the awesome-est things in the world often are!”

Welcome to Your Awesome Robot by Viviane Schwarz

Welcome to Your Awesome Robot by Viviane Schwarz

Welcome to Your Awesome Robot, by Viviane Schwarz, is part comic, part how-to guide, and all around a hilarious way to use your imagination to make something cool. It follows the story of a child who receives a cardboard box with the title phrase written across it.

From there, we explore the fun and logistics of making your own personal robot costume. The book explains the materials you need, tasks that might require adult assistance, and potential hazards to be aware of during your robot's construction. With this guide, your imagination is your only limit.

Uncle Andy's by James Warhola

Uncle Andy's by James Warhola

Ah, the wacky uncle. He is an institution as old as the concept of family itself. Many can claim to have one, but few can say that his uncle is one of the most important artists of the 20th century. That's where Uncle Andy's, by James Warhola, figures in.

Before Warhol was a painter, a filmmaker, and a celebrity, he was Andrew Warhola. After college, he shortened his name and left his home in Pittsburgh to start an art career in Manhattan. But back in Steel City was Andy's older brother Paul, who worked in a junkyard and was father to seven children, one of whom was our author/illustrator James. Paul used a lot of the trash he found to make sculptures, and if he found something particularly unusual, he would bring it to Andy.