10/24/2016 - 9:05am
If you like The Mitten by Jan Brett

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The Mitten: A Ukrainian Folktale by Jan Brett
Baba, Nicki's grandmother, knits pure white mittens for him, even though she is afraid that he will lose them in the snow. Sure enough, the first time Nicki is out, he drops one and some animals promptly move into its snug wool interior. First comes a mole, then a rabbit, a hedgehog, an owl, a badger, a fox, a bear and, finally, a mouse. That mouse tickles the bear's nose and he sneezes, dislodging all of the animals at once. Nicki finds his mitten, and takes it home, but Baba is left to wonder about how it became so enormously stretched out. Brett's magnificent paintings feature her usual array of folk details, and this time, intricate knitting tracks, ornate embroidery, the crusty, peeling texture of the birch bark borders and the exquisite patterns found in Baba's homey rooms. (Publisher's Weekly)

If you like books like The Mitten, check out these other wintery children's titles:

Danny's First Snow
by Leonid Gore
When he ventures outside to experience his first snowfall, a young rabbit discovers that his world has greatly changed. (catalog summary)


Frozen Wild: How Animals Survive in the Coldest Places on Earth
by Jim Arnosky
Describes how some animals survive in frigid regions, including muskrats, walruses, and the Arctic fox. With great five fold-out pages! (catalog summary)


10/19/2016 - 1:26pm
Time Travel -- Patawomeck Style

Time travel to the year 1608 in a Patawomeck village set up at the Salem Church Branch on Saturday, November 5, between 9:00 and 3:00.

Local Patawomeck tribe members will transform the library grounds into their village as it was when Captain John Smith sailed up the Potomac River. Chief John Lightner says, “We take great pride in bringing history to life by creating actual experiences for people. You get a taste of the real thing.”

07/07/2016 - 12:08am
Cover to Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie

“I hate my name!” shouts Thunder Boy Jr., a little boy who is named after his father. “People call him Big Thunder. That nickname is a storm filling up the sky,” he says of his dad. “People call me Little Thunder. That nickname makes me sound like a burp or a fart.”

06/23/2016 - 2:50pm
The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game

“He saw the crowd roar.”

One of the best baseball players never heard the crowd cheer for him. William Hoy was born on an Ohio farm in 1862. When he was only a toddler, he caught meningitis and lost his hearing. He went to the state’s school for the deaf where he learned to communicate with sign language. William did well and graduated as valedictorian, but there was one thing he could not do while he was in school—play baseball.

03/10/2016 - 9:28am
The Only Child by Guojing

In The Only Child, a girl leaves home without telling her parents, hoping to visit her grandma. She soon finds herself lost, alone, and afraid in the woods. When she comes across a mighty stag, her fortunes turn as a magical adventure begins.

03/03/2016 - 3:37pm
Across the Alley by Richard Michelson

During the day, Abe practices his violin to please his Jewish grandfather. His African-American neighbor Willie works to be as good at baseball as his father, a starter in the Negro leagues. But at night, the two boys meet Across the Alley in this story by Richard Michelson. Leaning out their bedroom windows, they swap hobbies and share dreams, until the night they are discovered.

12/30/2015 - 9:52am

Where Are the Great Plains?

The Great Plains are the part of North America east of the Rocky Mountains and west of the Mississippi River. The American states that are part of this region are Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The land there is flat and includes prairie, steppe and grassland.

Who Are the Plains Indians?

There were many differently-named tribes who lived on the Great Plains when the Europeans came, but they mostly shared a common culture because of living in similar environments. The buffalo (bison) was a major source of food along with other game and cultivated crops. They also gathered wild fruits and vegetables. Nomadic (roaming) tribes lived in large teepees, often painted with religious symbols. Tribes that did not roam often lived in earthen or grass lodges and would grow crops.

03/26/2015 - 12:58am
Nory Ryan's Song by Patricia Reilly Giff

Saint Patrick’s Day is just behind us, with its shamrocks, leprechauns, and green everything. It’s a cheerful time to be Irish or just pretend to be. Nory Ryan’s Song is a novel for young people (and everyone, really) about a much darker time in Irish history. During the Great Famine in the 1800s, the already poor people found themselves starving when the one fail-safe crop—potatoes—failed them.

07/23/2015 - 12:30pm
The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and Jory John

The Terrible Two is a devious satire of middle school life where no one is spared. Miles Murphy was the prankster king at his old school, then he had to move to boring, old Yawnee Valley, famous for its abundant cow population. Miles is not happy. He will have to establish his pranking cred all over again.

07/22/2015 - 12:39pm
Hands & Hearts with 15 Words in American Sign Language by Donna Jo Napoli, illustrated by Amy Bates

Donna Jo Napoli and Amy Bates’ Hands & Hearts is a sweet picture book for children who might be interested in learning a few ASL signs. It’s a beach day story of a mother and daughter having a wonderful time together. Off to the side of each page is an illustration of how to sign one of the words in the text.


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