LibraryPoint Blog

Find out about library events and services, books and authors in the news, and more.

Library 2010-2011 Budget Update

Dear Library Users,

On behalf of the Library Board, the Friends of the Library and the library staff, thank you all for your support over the past budget season.  The good news is that, despite the current economy, the CRRL did receive additional funds in FY10-11.  The challenge is that we did not receive enough money to fully staff and operate all our libraries.


This means that, starting July 1, we will have to take the following steps:

  • Headquarters and Porter will be closed on Sundays.
  • Headquarters will be closed on Thursday evenings and Porter will be closed on Tuesday evenings.
  • The England Run Library will open on October 4.
  • Programs for children, teens and adults will be reduced.
  • Outreach to schools, including booktalks, SOL-related storytelling and database presentations, will be severely reduced.
  • Reduced staffing may result in longer waits for materials placed on hold and for books to be returned to the shelves.
  • Staff will not receive any salary increase for the third year in a row.

We do appreciate the one-time funding that will increase our book-buying capacity in the coming year.  However, the materials budget remains substantially below recommended levels.

Over the last several months, you made your voices heard. 

  • You sent almost 3,000 postcards to your elected officials stating why the library is important to you.
  • You spoke up for the library at supervisors’ town meetings, public hearings and meetings of county boards and city council.
  • You sent letters to the editor of the Free Lance-Star expressing your support for the library as homeschoolers, business owners, students and impassioned readers.

The library is especially appreciative of the effort made by the Friends of the Library to help library users make their opinions known.  Whether distributing postcards, selling T-shirts, or speaking up in public forums, our Friends did a magnificent job.

The Library Board and administration are committed to continuing to provide high quality library services with an emphasis on excellent customer service despite the budget shortfall.  Rest assured that our commitment to providing access to all our users remains firm.  Thank you for your support.

Donna Cote,
Library Director

Exclamation Mark by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld

Exclamation Mark by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld

Who knew that puncuation had so much pathos?! Exclamation Mark stands out from all the periods around him. He tries fitting in, but that line above his head just makes him stand out so much! Exclamation Mark must eventually face the fact that he is different. At first, it does not feel good.

Russka: The Novel of Russia by Edward Rutherfurd

Russka: The Novel of Russia by Edward Rutherfurd

Edward Rutherfurd’s Russka is a sprawling, engaging book that delves into the lives of many generations who are determined to survive and even thrive in a Russian village.

Seconds by Bryan Lee O'Malley

Seconds by Bryan Lee O'Malley

What if you could go back and fix one mistake in your life? That's the premise of Seconds. Bryan Lee O'Malley's follow-up to his graphic novel series Scott Pilgrim seamlessly blends fantastical themes with realistic internal conflict.

First Test by Tamora Pierce

First Test by Tamora Pierce

No Girls! Go Home! You Won't Last!

As Kel surveyed the damage done to her room-- mattresses, sheets, and blankets strewn everywhere, desk drawers dumped out onto the floor, wall hangings sliced with a glaive, and that message scrawled so plainly on the plaster walls, she knew the battle to be accepted as page was just the beginning.

Homework Help at the Library

Homework Help at the Library

The library is an invaluable homework help resource even in the Google age. Need a tutor?  We provide HelpNow which offers live online tutors in all subjects for all ages. Writing a research paper? Librarians have favorite internet search engines too, but don’t forget specialized online research tools that you can access with your library card; some even provide full-text journal articles. Studying a foreign language or getting ready for an important test? We have online resources for those homework needs too!

If you like The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

If you like The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: Symbologist Robert Langdon returns in this thriller follow-up to The Da Vinci Code. 

If you like The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown, you may also like the following titles:

 

Brotherhood of the Holy Shroud by Julia Navarro
Flames engulf Turin's cathedral, home of the famed Shroud, and soon the Italian Art Crimes Department is tracking a mystery back to the Knights Templar. 

 

 

The Confessor by Daniel Silva
When a Jewish scholar working in Munich is murdered and all his research stolen, Gabriel Allon, a seemingly gentle artist working patiently on a restoration, is called upon to make discreet inquiries into the incident. 

 

Meaniehead by Bruce Eric Kaplan

Meaniehead by Bruce Eric Kaplan

"Meaniehead!" Eve screams at her brother Henry as they start a spat for the ages. It all began over a simple toy, as these things often do. Author Bruce Eric Kaplan wryly comments, "There's nothing sillier than fighting about what belongs to whom, but no kids and even fewer adults know that."

Soon the bickering turns into all-out mayhem. A lamp breaks, then Henry jackhammers a hole through Eve's bedroom floor! Things truly begin to escalate once Eve finds a bulldozer. No one is safe.

Still Life by Louise Penny

Still Life by Louise Penny

Still Life, Louise Penny’s debut novel and the first book in a series, introduces readers to Armand Gamache, Chief Inspector of Homicide with the Sûreté du Québec. The mystery opens with Jane Neal, a 76-year-old woman living in the village of Three Pines, being found dead on the Sunday after Thanksgiving.

Vertigo 42 by Martha Grimes

Vertigo 42 by Martha Grimes

Martha Grimes’ Vertigo 42 unfolds with Detective Superintendent Richard Jury meeting with a man who wants him to look into the long-ago death of his wife Tess. At the time, it was ruled an accident, but he has always wondered, and Jury agrees to help him. In the course of his investigations, another death takes place—that of a young woman beautifully dressed and found at the bottom of a tower. Piece by piece, the plot evolves, and the two separate cases become one. In fact, they both turn out to be linked to a still earlier case, a child’s death at a party given by Tess. Was that an accident, too?