LibraryPoint Blog

10/21/2016 - 2:30pm
Food and Hunger: A Community Conversation

Voting is just one way to exercise our right to civic participation this November. Coming together as a community to discuss and tackle important local issues, such as food and hunger, is another. Central Rappahannock Regional Library and the Salem Run Neighborhood Watch are sponsors of the new, biannual public forum series called "Community Conversations," intended to spark dialogue and foster collaboration and partnerships. 

10/21/2016 - 9:32am

There are many monsters associated with Halloween. Besides Dracula and his kind, mummies are among the most fascinating of these. The mummies appearing in horror films and literature have many differences, but one thing remains constant: they are cursed to remain alive forever. They also have a doomed romantic attraction to at least one mortal woman and a burning hatred of all other mortals that has endured for centuries.

10/20/2016 - 5:51pm
Chris Glover, Central Rappahannock Regional Library’s Assistant Director for Technology

Chris Glover, the Central Rappahannock Regional Library’s (CRRL) Assistant Director for Technology, is the winner of the first Public Library Innovator Award given by the Virginia Library Association. This award recognizes public librarians or public library project teams who have made an outstanding contribution to advance the mission of a public library in Virginia through an innovative project, program, or service.

10/20/2016 - 3:33pm

I recently had to get 12 stitches in my leg. It was mesmerizing to watch! But for some reason, nobody wanted to see the pictures I took of the bloody gash or the resulting row of neat black stitches.

I grew up with a nurse mom and a nuclear physicist dad, so our dinnertime conversations were often scientific discourse about what happened in surgery or the emergency room. I didn't realize that this wasn't normal until I horrified some of my playmates with stories they found unbearably gruesome.

In college, I was a serials check-in clerk for the medical library and was fascinated by some of the medical journals. I couldn't wait to look at the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report!

If you find medical history fascinating, look at some of the books on my Medical Mysteries and Maladies booklist.  

10/19/2016 - 1:26pm
Time Travel -- Patawomeck Style

Time travel to the year 1608 in a Patawomeck village set up at the Salem Church Branch on Saturday, November 5, between 9:00 and 3:00.

Local Patawomeck tribe members will transform the library grounds into their village as it was when Captain John Smith sailed up the Potomac River. Chief John Lightner says, “We take great pride in bringing history to life by creating actual experiences for people. You get a taste of the real thing.”

10/18/2016 - 12:41am

I was looking at some new picture books recently, and there were two very cute books in the pile featuring cats. It got me thinking about a conversation I had a while ago with a fellow librarian who is a cat lover. She was expressing her disappointment because she felt that cats were underrepresented in children’s picture books. Books featuring dogs seem plentiful, but books with cats are a little harder to find. I don’t know what this means: do people in general really prefer dogs over cats, or is it just children’s book authors and publishers who seem to favor dogs?

I certainly do not want to get in the middle of the perennial cats vs. dogs debate, but I do want to let cat lovers know: do not despair!  There is a wide variety of delightful picture books featuring cats, and I have pulled together a list of some of my favorites. Some are funny; some are sweet; some have outstanding illustrations; and all feature cats. As I thought about this topic, it got me thinking that because there is a day for everything, surely there must a National Cat Day, and there is! Feline fans, celebrate your cuddly companions any day, but on October 29, National Cat Day, I suggest you make a special point of grabbing one of these books about cats and inviting a child to enjoy a story with you.

10/20/2016 - 2:59pm

Now that I have a young child, I’ve become more aware of how short her attention span is. I know that I can have one, maybe two short books in a row before her attention wanders away, and she wants to do something else (which also explains why we love songs and playing so much in our Grow a Reader classes). Since making this discovery, I’ve been on the hunt for some books that are short and colorful that she’ll enjoy and ones I’m enthusiastic about reading to her. So, I’ve gathered together a list of shorter picture books that make her giggle, coo, and generally pay attention.  

10/14/2016 - 12:38am
A History of Classic Monsters: Creature from the Black Lagoon

To date, humans have explored less than 5% of the world’s oceans. Whatever is lying in wait beneath the cavernous dark water is something yet to be discovered. Many scientists speculate that there are creatures such as the giant squid, which live in deep, seemingly endless trenches, hiding in the dark. Can there be other creatures as well—possibly from the Black Lagoon?

In 1941, producer William Alland was attending a dinner party for the classic Citizen Kane, when Mexican cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa told him about a myth that involved a half-fish, half-human creature on the Amazon River. Ten years later, Alland wrote a screenplay dubbed The Sea Monster, partially based on the French fairy tale, Beauty and the Beast. Following the success of the 3D House of Wax in 1953, Jack Arnold was hired to direct the rewrite of Sea Monster which was now Creature from the Black Lagoon.

10/13/2016 - 10:31am
The Next Big Library Read is Here!

From October 13-28, OverDrive's Big Library Read is back with the eBook and audiobook format of This Is Where It Ends, by Marieke Nijkamp.

This Is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp
Minutes after the principal of Opportunity High School in Alabama finishes her speech welcoming the student body to a new semester, she discovers that the auditorium doors will not open, and someone starts shooting a gun as four teens, each with a personal reason to fear the shooter, tell the tale from separate perspectives.

In Nijkamp's story, the message she shares is even more poignant today than ever, due to campus attacks and other mass shooting around the United States. The subject of gun violence is treated realistically, increasing awareness of the problem for both adults and teens.

During the Big Library Read, the digital version of this book will be available to all library customers to download for free. This is Where it Ends can be read on all major computers and devices. Like all of our eBooks, it will automatically expire at the end of the lending period, so there are never any late fees.

In addition to having a message board where readers can communicate with each other, OverDrive will also have a podcast episode where the author will talk with OverDrive's Professional Book Nerds.

10/07/2016 - 12:34am
A History of Classic Monsters: The Invisible Man

H.G. Wells, author of the The Time Machine (1895) and The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), released his fourth novel, The Invisible Man, in 1897.

Many of his readers were surprised to discover that Wells had adopted a third person narrative instead of first person for this particular novel. The protagonist, Dr. Griffin, is a scientist who is interested in optics. He learns how to invent a way to change a body’s refractive index to that of air. Thus, the body neither absorbs nor reflects light, allowing for invisibility. The ambitious Griffin successfully completes the procedure on himself, but he can’t seem to figure out how to reverse it.


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