Parenting

Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture By Peggy Orenstein

Cinderella Ate My Daughter

Peggy Orenstein has established an entire career around her ability to describe and analyze the ways young women learn, socialize, and advance into adulthood. She even wrote a highly influential book exposing how gender dynamics operate within the American education system (Schoolgirls). When her own daughter became ensnared in “girlie-girl” culture, however, Orenstein was forced to admit that her extensive academic knowledge did not prepare her to negotiate the paradoxes of growing up female in the 21st century. Cinderella Ate My Daughter chronicles Orenstein’s parenting crisis and her subsequent investigation into how femininity is being scripted by marketing, princess mania, and popular culture.

The Mindful Child: How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate

By Susan Kaiser Greenland

Go to catalog

"...a groundbreaking book, the first to show parents how to teach these transformative practices to their children. Mindful awareness works by enabling you to pay closer attention to what is happening within you--your thoughts, feelings, and emotions--so you can better understand what is happening to you. The Mindful Child extends the vast benefits of mindfulness training to children from four to eighteen years old with age-appropriate exercises, songs, games, and fables that Susan Kaiser Greenland has developed over more than a decade of teaching mindful awareness to kids. These fun and friendly techniques build kids' inner and outer awareness and attention, which positively affects their academic performance as well as their social and emotional skills, such as making friends, being compassionate and kind to others, and playing sports, while also providing tools to manage stress and to overcome specific challenges like insomnia, overeating, ADHD, hyper-perfectionism, anxiety, and chronic pain. When children take a few moments before responding to stressful situations, they allow their own healthy inner compasses to click in and guide them to become more thoughtful, resilient, and empathetic."

Reserve this title

Launching Our Black Children for Success: A Guide for Parents of Kids from Three to Eighteen

By Joyce A. Ladner with Theresa Foy DiGeronimo

Go to catalog

"This extraordinary book takes black parents step-by-step through the stages of child development so they can build a solid foundation for success in their children. It shows how to best instill pride, self-discipline, social skills, a work ethic, and a way to deal with the inevitable racism and prejudice their children will face. Authors Joyce Ladner and Theresa Foy DiGeronimo also offer a practical guide for overcoming the many injustices and obstacles African American families face and show how to shepherd their kids through the process that is required to help children keep their 'eyes on the prize.'"

Reserve this title

The Measure of Our Success: A Letter to My Children and Yours

By Marian Wright Edelman

Go to catalog

Founder of the Children's Defense Fund, author Marian Wright Edelman has penned a short, charming book on lessons to live by. Among her lessons for life: Be confident that you can make a difference; Remember your roots, your history, and the forebears' shoulders on which you stand; Never work just for money or for power. They won't save your soul or help you sleep at night.

Reserve this title

The Black Parenting Book

By Anne C. Beal and Linda Villarosa and Allison Abner

Go to catalog

A stellar trio of authors provides the first complete guide to rearing African-American children, from infancy through the preschool years, featuring the latest information on health care, cultural issues, and child development.

Reserve this title

Raising Black children: Two Leading Psychiatrists Confront the Educational, Social, and Emotional Problems Facing Black Children

By James P. Comer and Alvin F. Poussaint

Go to catalog

Along with the traditional demands of parenthood, black parents face an even more challenging task--fighting the negative messages of racism while teaching their children to succeed in a white-dominated culture. In this timely book, two eminent psychiatrists address these concerns.

Reserve this title

Different and Wonderful: Raising Black Children in a Race-Conscious Society

By Darlene Powell Hopson and Derek S. Hopson

Go to catalog

A guidebook to help instill a positive self-image and self-respect in black children and to prepare them to deal with racism, written by practicing clinical psychologists and parents.

Reserve this title

What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 by Tina Seelig

I am a loving (and interfering) mother of a 20-year-old son so I thought I would read What I Wish I Knew When I was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World and pass it on to him. I admit to sending him emails about Erik Erikson’s Stages of Development and what he should be doing as a young adult: intimacy versus isolation (Son, pick the correct side of the equation!) so I thought this book would give him a head’s up.

The author, Tina Seelig, also a mother of a 20 year old son, teaches courses on entrepreneurship at Stanford University and is a voice for creative thinking and problem solving. I especially like her examples in this book of innovative ways to come up with solutions. She gives her students an item – paper clips or rubber bands, for example – and challenges them to create as much value as possible with the item.