Parenting

09/26/2016 - 9:52am
Cover to The Baby Owner's Manual

There are a few things people may not know about librarians, or at least this librarian. And that is that I LOVE research. Seriously. So when I found out I was expecting a bundle of joy, I did exactly that. I wanted to know what to expect and how to handle any situation that came up (yes, that was naive of me, I know). But by doing this I discovered some amazing books about pregnancy, infants, and things to do with your bundles of joy once they arrive. There are so many pregnancy books out there that it can be a tad overwhelming, so here are my favorite books about pregnancy and beyond, and I hope that they help you as much as they helped me . . . or will help me in the future. 

09/12/2016 - 1:31pm
Join Us for a Parent's Guide to Nature Play

Children today spend about half as much time outdoors as their parents did. It's believed children who play outside have improved creativity and concentration and may show less aggression.

Join Fredericksburg Parks & Recreation Nature Educator Mimi Dempsey for a parents-only evening to learn about incorporating outdoor nature play into your family activities. Please meet in Room 2 at Headquarters Library on Tuesday, September 27 at 6:30.  A “river walk” along the Rappahannock will follow the informational session (weather permitting), so dress accordingly.

08/16/2016 - 12:47pm
Cover to Parenting Children with ADHD

“We need to have a meeting to discuss your child’s behavior.”

Those words on a note from school can be the start of parenting on a different level, and it’s something that happens frequently. According to the CDC, it is estimated that 11% of students ages 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD. Given that the diagnosis rate has increased substantially from year to year—and that data is from 2011—it may be higher yet.

08/09/2016 - 10:12am
Kindergarten Prep Guide

The first day of kindergarten is coming! Whether your child is excited for this new adventure or feeling a little nervous, we have some great book suggestions for kids preparing for the Big K.

06/20/2016 - 12:05pm
Grow a Reader: Print Awareness

One of my favorite things to do when reading with young children is to pretend that I’ve forgotten how to hold a book. Do we start in the middle? No, that’s funny! Can we read the book backwards or upside down? Of course, not!

Children love to make connections between written language and the words that they hear spoken aloud, especially while having fun and enjoying books together. Understanding how books work and that the text on a page has meaning is called print awareness, an important early literacy skill for children to develop on their way to reading.

11/17/2015 - 2:32pm
Image of alert newborn being held

When I was fresh out of college and a first year teacher, I was very interested in applying all my knowledge, both practical and book-learned. The paraprofessional who worked with me in my classroom once joked, “When you have kids of your own, you’re going to read every book about raising kids and then find out that they can’t really tell you anything!!” Well, many years later, her words have come true . . . but just partially. With the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, I have access to hundreds of books on child-rearing—all I have to do is place a hold.

04/24/2012 - 3:31am
Cinderella Ate My Daughter

Peggy Orenstein has established an entire career around her ability to describe and analyze the ways young women learn, socialize, and advance into adulthood. She even wrote a highly influential book exposing how gender dynamics operate within the American education system (Schoolgirls). When her own daughter became ensnared in “girlie-girl” culture, however, Orenstein was forced to admit that her extensive academic knowledge did not prepare her to negotiate the paradoxes of growing up female in the 21st century. Cinderella Ate My Daughter chronicles Orenstein’s parenting crisis and her subsequent investigation into how femininity is being scripted by marketing, princess mania, and popular culture.

05/12/2016 - 12:11pm

I am a loving (and interfering) mother of a 20-year-old son so I thought I would read What I Wish I Knew When I was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World and pass it on to him. I admit to sending him emails about Erik Erikson’s Stages of Development and what he should be doing as a young adult: intimacy versus isolation (Son, pick the correct side of the equation!) so I thought this book would give him a head’s up.

The author, Tina Seelig, also a mother of a 20-year-old son, teaches courses on entrepreneurship at Stanford University and is a voice for creative thinking and problem solving. I especially like her examples in this book of innovative ways to come up with solutions. She gives her students an item – paper clips or rubber bands, for example – and challenges them to create as much value as possible with the item. 
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