Craig Graziano

05/29/2018 - 11:36am
Cover to Sidekicks by Dan Santat

Metro City’s very own superhero Captain Amazing is getting too old for his job, so he’s going to need some backup. Sidekicks is the journey of some die-hard hero wannabes who wish to join the captain for one very simple reason: They are his pets, and he hasn’t been paying them any attention lately.

It seems like a good idea, and Roscoe the dog (hero name Metal Mutt) seems like a shoe-in. Who would be a better superhero sidekick than man’s best friend? Unfortunately, ever since an incident with Amazing’s last animal sidekick, he’s adopted a strict no-pet policy.

Sure, all of these guys bring something to the table. Roscoe is big and strong; Shifty the Chameleon has powers of camouflage. Manny the cat has actual experience in the field. But what can tiny hamster Fluffy possibly do? At least he has a teeny, tiny Captain America costume.

05/07/2018 - 10:07am
Cover to Oh No! (Or How My Science Project Destroyed the World) by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Dan Santat

A bright young girl runs through the chaos of demolished streets. Plumes of black smoke rise from the rubbled buildings. No one else is in sight. Oh No! (Or How My Science Project Destroyed the World) is a life lesson that everyone should receive: always take responsibility for your actions, particularly when they involve a ginormous hulking robot with the power to crush cars and shoot lasers every which way.

Usually, when my school science projects went wrong, it was more of a mild disappointment than anything else. My baking-soda-and-vinegar volcano did not erupt. I received a C- instead of a B+. These are minor hiccups when compared to our main character’s situation. Oh No! allows us to think about our own mistakes and say, “Well, it could have been worse…much, much worse.”

05/01/2018 - 9:10am
Cover to A Whole Nother Story

There are a lot of stories out there: boy wizards, girl detectives, wimpy kids, and underpantsed captains. Despite the many possibilities and numerous titles to read, there may be that ever-lurking fear that there is not a story out there for you. In this is the case, you might want to avoid a panic attack by taking a note from Dr. Cuthbert Soup, head of the National Center for Unsolicited Advice.

04/25/2018 - 9:16am
Cover to Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan

What would happen if you met someone who had the exact same name as you? Would you examine them, looking for any similarities and differences, desperately trying to figure the other one out? Two high school students from suburban Chicago are about to find out, and both of them are Will Grayson in Will Grayson, Will Grayson, by John Green and David Levithan.

One lives by two rules: 1. Don’t care too much. 2. Shut Up. By following them, Will has made it through life without too many bruises. Unfortunately, his best friend Tiny Cooper is royally wrecking everything for him. Royal is appropriate for Tiny, a gigantic queen who just happens to be the school’s best football player and the writer/director/star of his own biographical musical, Tiny Dancer. This, along with Tiny’s constant attempts to get Will to go out with their mutual friend Jane, is exactly the kind of attention that Will does not want.

11/28/2017 - 10:27am
If you like A Night Divided by Jennifer Nielsen

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

10/09/2017 - 9:50am
My Librarian: Monstrous Picture Books

There are so many fantastic monster picture books out there! From classics, such as the beastly Where the Wild Things Are, to interactive reads, such as Go Away Big, Green Monster, the library has all sorts of tales about creatures that are friendly, fearsome, silly, and suspenseful.

Here are my favorite picture books that feature monsters of all kinds. Find one that you like and have a howling good storytime!

06/01/2018 - 3:33pm
MakerLab Badging

Would you like to earn the 3D printer badge?  Sign up today and you can learn hands on how to use a 3D printer independently at training sessions offered at the England Run BranchFredericksburg Library, and  Porter Branch.

01/09/2018 - 10:07am
The After Party

What happens in the library after dark? The After Party is your chance to find out! Salem Church Branch and Howell Branch (formerly England Run) invite area teens to come walk our red carpet as we celebrate the event of the year.  Come hang with your friends, listen to music, make art, and watch movies while enjoying free food, goodie bags, and giveaways.

08/25/2016 - 11:32am
If you like Diary of a Wimpy Kid (for Teens)

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
Greg records his sixth grade experiences in a middle school where he and his best friend, Rowley, undersized weaklings amid boys who need to shave twice daily, hope just to survive, but when Rowley grows more popular, Greg must take drastic measures to save their friendship. (catalog summary)
 

If you're looking for a title similar title to Diary of a Wimpy Kid, but for teens and not kids, look no further! Check out this list of humorous, young adult titles.

 

 


Boys Don't Knit (In Public) by Tom Easton
After a brush with the law, Ben, a dyed-in-the-wool worrier, must take up a new hobby and chooses knitting, an activity at which he excels but must try to keep secret from his friends, enemies, and sports-obsessed father. (catalog summary)

 

 

 

 


House Arrest by K.A. Holt
Young Timothy is sentenced to house arrest after impulsively stealing a wallet, and he is forced to keep a journal into which he pours all his thoughts, fears, and frustrations. (catalog summary)
 

 

 

08/25/2016 - 12:05am
The Nest by Kenneth Oppel

"We've come because of the baby," she said. "We've come to help."

The Nest appeared soon after Steve's baby brother came home from the hospital, hanging from the eaves of the roof. Steve did not know exactly what was wrong with his new sibling, but he overheard his parents use words like "poor prognosis" and "degenerative." It was not long until Steve saw the wasps in his yard . . . and in his dreams.

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