Craig Graziano

03/06/2014 - 9:37am
The Adventure Time Encyclopaedia by Martin Olson

The Adventure Time Encyclopaedia is an ancient and magical tome, or maybe it's just designed to look that way. The book explores the characters and situations that occupy the popular Cartoon Network series. There are few cartoons as imaginative or strange as Adventure Time, in which a boy and his dog fight evil in various forms, including an Ice King, monsters, demons, giants, and the hideous creature known as The Lich.

02/27/2014 - 3:02am
Pssst! by Adam Rex

"Pssst!" is what a young girl at the zoo hears as she walks by each animal enclosure. They all want her to bring them increasingly outrageous and seemingly random items.

Sure, the gorilla's swing is broken, so a new tire does not seem that out of the question. And maybe bicycle helmets would be a good investment for a slipping sloth. But the turkeys don't want to eat the corn they ask for— they want to turn it into ethanol. Our young heroine is going to have a hard time meeting all of these demands.

02/26/2014 - 3:02am
Born Standing Up by Steve Martin

In Born Standing Up, Steve Martin looks back at his comedy career in a way that few artists are able to do. He not only has succeeded in his craft, he also has the luxury of being able to step back from the act and make sense of just what it was all about.

In the 1970's and 80's, Martin attained a kind of success usually reserved for rock stars. He filled up arenas and released number one albums, but  Martin is quick to point out that this was no overnight sensation. He spent his youth trying to break into the entertainment business by working at Disneyland and writing for the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour.

02/20/2014 - 3:02am
Beep and Bah by James Burks

Beep and Bah is the story of a robot and a goat on an adventure for the ages. A sock is missing its match, and it's up to this pair of unlikely friends to get it back. Daring Beep is game to search the entire world for the sock's "sole" mate while the more cautionary Bah follows behind.

02/19/2014 - 3:01am
My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf

First off, yes, it is that Dahmer. Secondly, yes, this book is written and drawn by a man named Derf Backderf.

My Friend Dahmer is much more than just a grisly expose on the teenage life of a future serial killer; it is also a rumination on the culture of 1970's suburbia, where teens were left to their own devices in the wake of divorce or career-minded parents.

02/17/2014 - 3:01am
Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler

Why We Broke Up is by Daniel Handler and features art by Maira Kalman, and both elements elevate it above your average high school romance novel.

Min has just left a box on Ed's doorstep. The box contains the pieces of evidence of their brief relationship, as well as letters explaining each piece's importance.

03/14/2014 - 3:41pm
Lapsed Catholics and Stray Bullets: The Works of Martin McDonagh

For the past two decades, Martin McDonagh has established himself as a sensational writer of emotional disturbance and darkly funny exchanges in his Irish-set plays and crime-focused films. He may not be a household name, but that name already has an Academy Award and several Tony nominations under its belt. We have a number of his works in the collection worth recommending.

 

Written in the mid-Nineties, The Beauty Queen of Leenane and Other Plays offers a trilogy of stories centered around the same town and immediately shows McDonagh's gifts for cleverly inane banter and simmering tensions.

02/13/2014 - 3:02am
Odd Duck by Cecil Castellucci and Sara Varon

Theodora is an Odd Duck, but she doesn't realize it yet. She does all the normal chores that ducks do: swimming; buying mango salsa; and checking out library books. She knows what she wants in life, preferring to stay home in the winter with a nice cup of tea while all of the other ducks fly south.

02/11/2014 - 3:02am
Jim Henson: The Biography by Brian Jay Jones

Jim Henson: The Biography approaches the man through his work. This makes sense since, as he was the artist who redefined puppetry, Henson created and entertained almost non-stop for four decades.

02/06/2014 - 3:01am
The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt and Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

The Day the Crayons Quit is a most imaginative book in terms of its story and its artwork. One day while looking in his crayon box, Duncan finds a stack of scrawled messages instead of crayons.

One by one we read each color's reason for going on strike, written in its color. Red feels totally overworked. Purple is tired of contributing to messy pictures. Yellow and Orange cannot agree on who deserves to be the color of the sun. This is a young artist's worst nightmare.

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