Holiday Closing: All branches will be closed starting at 5:00 pm Wednesday, Nov. 25 and continuing Thursday, Nov. 26 and Friday, Nov. 27 for the Thanksgiving holiday.

Children's Book Columns

01/23/2015 - 2:23am

I know what you’re thinking, wrong holiday, but if your winter vacation time is anything like mine you will be on the open road as much as you’ll be at home.  Our family will while away the traffic by listening to audiobooks. This past year I’ve started listening more regularly. It’s been a great way to increase the number of  books I “read” and makes my short commute go even more quickly. Here are some of my favorite audios that promise to entrance a car full of family no matter how long the journey.

01/22/2015 - 11:34am
Great Books

Forbidding outside temperatures aside, there are so many reasons to curl up with a great book. Readers meet a variety of fascinating characters and there’s an empathy that comes from reading about different lives and experiences that carries over to the real world. They learn new perspectives and have vicarious experiences. Personally, I have no ambition to ever sail around the world, but I love to read books about those who do. Books can also create an atmosphere that oozes from the pages and there’s just something wonderful about the lushness of great writing and the aha moment of discovering new words.  Here are a few books that encompass all of these characteristics.

12/16/2014 - 12:42pm
Christmas Books

Like most families, we have our favorite holiday traditions. We decorate our tree the weekend after Thanksgiving and, every year, my husband watches Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol.  When I was young, my father always read C. Clement Moore’s “The Night Before Christmas” to my brother and I.  When my son was born, I couldn’t wait to uphold the tradition and searched for the just the right version that offered beautiful, detailed illustrations with a classic-looking Santa.  I hope your family has a favorite holiday read aloud. If “The Night Before Christmas” isn’t for you here are a couple of other suggestions; of course there are many more possibilities to enjoy as well.

11/25/2014 - 1:59pm
The Family Cooks by Laurie David

My niece is a tactile learner and uses touch to explore her world. That doesn’t work so well in an art museum or when there’s an unknown sticky substance nearby, but it’s ideal for cooking! She especially enjoys stirring, whisking and manning the salad spinner. Her enthusiasm can be challenging for adults trying to “get things done” but she pitches in whenever possible. This year, engage children in the holiday cooking and they will feel proud to have part in the celebration. You can also share your family’s culinary creations with the community by using #crrlfallfood on your favorite social media sites, including Facebook and Pinterest. Here are some cookbooks to inspire and help make cooking as a family easy and fun!

04/28/2014 - 3:12pm
Duck, Duck, Moose

Some books just aren’t meant to be read alone by an adult sitting quietly on her couch with no children in sight; naming no names of course.  They demand an audience so that the actions aren’t just read, but performed, and so that the words aren’t just said, but shouted!  You don’t need a room full of children to enjoy books at this level, this is the kind of fun that can be had even if there are just two of you!

03/25/2014 - 12:58pm
George Washington

Recently at the library, it’s all about George.  In preparation for our current Rappahannock Reads title, “George Washington, Spymaster” by Thomas B. Allen each branch has cardboard cutouts of the big man himself just waiting for you to take a selfie.  If you aspire to be more like George, then your family can enjoy our scavenger hunt and claim your prize--a George Washington mask!

03/11/2014 - 1:08pm
Battle Bunny by Jon Scieszka

It is vital for early elementary aged children to read introductory chapter books that they enjoy.  Reading is fun, but when you’re just learning sometimes you need encouragement that the hard work is worth it!   Even if your young person isn’t ready to tackle the following books independently, they are great read alouds that you both will enjoy while reinforcing the message that--you guessed it--reading is fun!

03/06/2014 - 1:26pm
Dr. Seuss

The library is having a party and everyone is invited!  More than two decades after his death, Dr. Seuss’ March birthday has become an annual, nationwide celebration for libraries and schools, and we are joining the fun!  After all, it’s only fitting that one of the most beloved children’s book authors receives such recognition.  His books are an intrinsic part of American cultural knowledge and span the generations with the first, “And To Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street,” published in 1937 to the last, “Oh, the Place You Will Go” in 1991, and include over 60 titles.  I bet most Americans even know many of his most memorable lines by heart.  While I could write an entire column about my favorites (“Green, Eggs and Ham,” “The Lorax,” and anything with Horton,) part of what I find so fascinating about Dr. Seuss is Theodor Geisel, the man behind the legend.      

06/07/2011 - 10:22am

Exciting things are happening at your local library. The summer reading club has begun!

There's a program for children and another for teens. Both are free, fun and designed to keep students reading all summer long. After all, whether it's a book, comic or magazine, summer reading equals summer learning.

The theme for this year's children's club and this column is "Amazing Tales." Be they of the animal, tall, folk or fairy variety, all can be found at your library!

04/05/2011 - 9:40am
17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore

Rules. Sometimes they’re awful and constricting, keeping us from doing what we want. 

That’s the situation in “17 Things I’m Not Allowed to Do Anymore” by Jenny Offill and Nancy Carpenter. It’s a humorous look at a child learning the rules by doing the wrong things. “I had an idea to do my George Washington report on beavers instead. I am not allowed to do reports on beavers anymore.” The poor girl progresses through a variety of bad ideas like stapling her brother’s hair to his pillow and giving him the gift of cauliflower. All, she learns, are forbidden. Illustrated with pen and ink, actual photographs of the offending items, (the stapler, the cauliflower) are humorously interspersed.


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