LibraryPoint Blog

06/26/2012 - 3:31am
Dorchester Terrace: A Charlotte and Thomas Pitt Novel by Anne Perry

For those who have followed Charlotte and Thomas Pitt from their awkward yet charming days of courtship in The Cater Street Hangman, Anne Perry’s recent Dorchester Terrace is a very enjoyable continuation of the series. Thomas has risen far since his days as a regular London policeman. He’s now head of Special Branch, a reward for his brilliant detective work and, probably not incidentally, saving Queen Victoria from a dastardly plot.

But, in class-conscious, 19th-century Britain, family background matters a lot to some people. Thomas, a gamekeeper’s son, often encounters people who question his ability to do his job when they find out who he isn’t. One of those is his immediate predecessor as head of Special Branch, Victor Narraway. In the preceding novel, Victor lost his job to Thomas almost but not quite disgracefully and rather lost his heart to Thomas’ clever and kind wife, Charlotte. Charlotte, born to live in Narraway’s world of privilege, has assisted her husband’s investigations through the years, but now that he is privy to so many state secrets, that will surely change—won’t it?

06/26/2012 - 3:31am

A group of teens and school librarians are devoting part of their summer to reading young adult books and discussing them at regular meetings.  Why?  They’re passionate about the library’s Cafe Book program--book discussion for seventh and eighth graders in area schools. These summer meetings result in a carefully balanced list of 20 titles for next year’s participants to read, then choose their favorites.  Each school just finished with last year’s titles, and selected their 2012 Teen Picks creating the ultimate suggested reading list for your middle school student.

06/25/2012 - 3:30am
A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin

It was the goat that gave it away.

Some young wizards-to-be discover their destinies through an engraved invitation. But for Sparrowhawk, unscrubbed and unbiddable goat herder on the island of Gont, an overheard word in the true, magical language was enough to get him started. Not just one stubborn goat but the whole herd was brought to heel with a single word. Clearly the lad had potential.

06/22/2012 - 2:50pm
Summer Reading at the Library

There’s no doubt about it, the library’s summer reading club can help your child succeed in school!  A recent study proved that children who joined public library summer reading clubs did better on fall standardized tests than their classmates who didn’t!  Our Headquarters Library and Fredericksburg’s Lafayette Upper Elementary school participated in the research sponsored by The Dominican University.  

The best news, is that joining our children’s program, Dream Big, or our teen one, Own the Night, is free and easy to do either in a branch or online at LibraryPoint.org/src.  Participants can read whatever they like or what is required by their schools.  Incentives and free programs are offered throughout making the library’s summer reading club perfect for fun.

06/22/2012 - 3:31am
If you like The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne: "Set in an early New England colony, the novel shows the terrible impact a single, passionate act has on the lives of three members of the community: the defiant Hester Prynne; the fiery, tortured Reverend Dimmesdale; and the obsessed, vengeful Chillingworth." (Book summary)

If you enjoyed The Scarlet Letter and are interested in similar classic novels, as well as stories with similar themes,
the following titles may be of interest to you:

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina tells of the doomed love affair between the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage and must endure the hypocrisies of society. Set against a vast and richly textured canvas of nineteenth-century Russia, the novel's seven major characters create a dynamic imbalance, playing out the contrasts of city and country life and all the variations on love and family happiness. (worldcat.org)

 

The Crucible by Arthur Miller
The Crucible is Arthur Miller's classic play about the witch-hunts and trials in seventeenth-century Salem, Massachusetts. Based on historical people and real events, Miller's drama is a searing portrait of a community engulfed by hysteria. The ruthlessness of the prosecutors and the eagerness of neighbor to testify against neighbor brilliantly illuminate the destructive power of socially sanctioned violence. (catalog description)

 

06/21/2012 - 11:03am

The opening months of the Civil War had a certain boldness and cachet to them. Young men in particular signed up in droves.  Picnickers came down from D.C. to take a gander at the First Battle of Manassas, discovering all too quickly that war is no theatrical entertainment.  However, four years later when the South was playing an end-game, the damage to not just its army but also to its civilians was clearly a factor in its surrender. In 1863, there had been bread riots in Richmond.  In 1864, the Shenandoah Valley’s crops and businesses had been burned by Union General Sheridan who was advised by his commander Grant to ”Give the enemy no rest ... Do all the damage to railroads and crops you can.”

And so it was. The civilians and soldiers alike were hit with shortages, and the last year of the war was a particularly brutal time. In William C. Davis’ and James I. Robertson, Jr.’s Virginia at War: 1865, the editors include eight essays by modern scholars and a diary from a Virginia woman, the wife of a minister, who observed that last year from her refugee quarters in Richmond where she served as a nurse and a clerk.

06/21/2012 - 3:31am
The Princess and the Packet of Frozen Peas by Tony Wilson and illustrated by Sue

So, we all know the fairy tale of the Princess and the Pea, right? She shows up at a castle late one night in the middle of a snowstorm. The prince falls in love with her beauty (evident even under the wet, bedraggled appearance), but the king and queen want to make sure she is a real princess. So, they put a single pea under a pile of 20 feather mattresses and wait to see if she notices. And, sure enough, the real princess emerges in the morning bruised and sore from the tiny pea. The prince and princess get married and live happily ever after. Except...well, did you ever think what it would be like to live with someone like that? Someone who couldn’t even stand a pea under her mattress? What about when she was hot? Disappointed? Challenged by some problem?

The Princess and the Packet of Frozen Peas, by Tony Wilson, takes the traditional Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale and stands it on its head. Prince Henrik doesn’t like the idea of marrying a princess who is sensitive. His brother is married to a very real, very high-maintenance princess who complains day and night about things that don’t suit her. Frankly, it’s a drag being around her, let alone married to her.

06/20/2012 - 3:46pm
Database in Depth:  CQ Researcher

It’s 10 p.m.  Your report on wind power is due tomorrow.  It is not even close to being done.  Your teacher has said you can’t use Internet sources.  You have a couple of books, but you need at least one more source.

You can’t decide if you should start faking sick now (like you could fool your mom), go to school tomorrow and try to beg your teacher for an extension (oh, sure), or just ignore the problem and hope it will solve itself (it's never worked before, but...).

There is another option.  Get out your CRRL library card, and visit Congressional Quarterly Researcher online.  Congressional Quarterly Wha...?  If you are writing a report about any “hot button” issue in the news, you need CQ Researcher

06/20/2012 - 2:14pm
SENIORNAVIGATOR E-QUICKTIP: Long-Distance Caregiving

Do any of these situations sound familiar to you?

-The phone rings at 10 p.m. notifying you that your father has fallen and rushed to the hospital with a probable broken hip.

-You call your mother several times one afternoon and evening without any answer.

-Your aunt’s neighbor calls you to tell you that the papers are piling up on the front doorstep over the past week and she is not answering the door.

Whether you live an hour away or across the country, long-distance caregiving can be a challenge for many families.

06/20/2012 - 5:21am
Watership Down by Richard Adams

Hazel was young and strong and a bit clever.  His best friend, however, was a runt no one thought much of.  But Hazel knew something about Fiver that made him respect the little fellow. Fiver was gifted with the Sight. He somehow could tell in advance what might be coming, and just then Fiver was terrified to the very marrow of his bones.

Rabbits such as Hazel and Fiver who live in the English countryside usually lead a pretty nice life. There are predators, sure. Foxes, hawks, and even stray dogs might grab an unwary rabbit. But rabbits are sociable creatures, living in cozy warrens underground, usually staying in the same place for years at a time. They eat together, play together, and follow a leader. And so it was at Sandleford warren.

Rabbits are usually rather biddable beings of habit so when Fiver, with Hazel backing him up, tries to convince their chief rabbit Threarah  that death and disaster are coming—and soon—it’s a losing situation.  After all, "The Threarah doesn't like anything he hasn't thought of for himself."  His Owsla guards don’t believe them, either, and it is against the rules of the warren to leave it without permission.  But they’re going to do it anyway.

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