LibraryPoint Blog

Find out about library events and services, books and authors in the news, and more.

Best-Kept Secrets of CRRL

Here are some of the CRRL's most popular services:

Ask a CRRL Librarian—It's our online reference service - you can chat live, or text, email, or call us.
 

Online databases available anytime, anywhere—CRRL library-card numbers are your password to thousands of magazine, news, and encyclopedia articles; lists of businesses and associations; and  literature and biography resources.
 

Interlibrary loan—Ask about it if you can't find a book in our branches. We're part of a worldwide network of libraries that share resources, and you can request your ILL online. Close to home, our relationship with University of Mary Washington lets us borrow from their collections and deliver items to our branches for checkout with your CRRL card.

Teen Art Show: Accepting Entries Now Through 3/1

16th Annual Teen Art Show

Entries are now being accepted for the 16th Annual Teen Art Show. Teens in grades 9-12 are eligible. Entries should be brought to Headquarters Library, 2nd floor desk by closing on Tuesday, March 1.

The show runs March 5 - March 30, with an opening reception on Friday, March 4, at 7:00pm, Headquarters Library.

For information about the show and entry forms visit http://teens.librarypoint.org/teen_art

CRRL Presents: The Reverend Theresie Houghton, Dedicated to Serving Others

Reverend Theresie Houghton

This interview airs beginning February 23.
The Reverend Theresie Houghton’s gentle manner and selfless commitment to the area’s poor, disadvantaged, and terminally ill have earned her the respect and admiration of people throughout our community. She helps and inspires all ages, particularly children. Debby Klein visits her on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, by Julia Alvarez

How the Garcial Girls Lost Their Accents

In a reverse chronological sequence of events, Julia Alvarez takes her readers through the immigration experience of the four Garcia sisters: Carla, Sandra, Yolanda and Sofia in How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. Leaving behind a life of privilege surrounded by their large extended family, the four girls move with their Papi and Mami to New York City, and begin the long, never-ending process of assimilating into American culture. The story is as much a coming of age tale as it is a feminist, Latino perspective on American culture, beautifully conveyed with a sprinkling of Spanish vocabulary here and there.

The sisters are adults at the beginning of the book, and going back in time, the reader experiences their divorces, marriages, college years, teenage angst and confusion, and efforts to learn English while attending American public schools. Their father’s involvement in a plot against the dictator, the subsequent investigations by the authorities, and the escape with the help of friends and family are all experienced by the reader alongside Carla, Sandra, Yolanda and Sofia. Alvarez did a good job of keeping me hooked. The why’s and the how’s unfold further and further the closer the reader gets to the end of the book--which is actually the beginning of the story. 

Picture Book Biographies

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down

I love reading biographies. Perhaps its sheer nosiness, but I am fascinated by the stories of how someone famous came to be. Unfortunately, finding time to read a 400 page adult biography and keep up with children and teen literature is practically impossible. Luckily, I can combine the two, especially when the biography is a picture book! 

Although it captures only one small part of their lives, Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney with illustrations by Brian Pinkney, is a biography of sorts. At a Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, David, Joseph, Franklin and Ezell sat waiting to be served. The law, you see, had a recipe for segregation, but these “kids had a recipe, too. A new brew called integration.” This husband-wife team always does stellar work, but this is one of my favorites from recent years. The lyrical prose flows so well into the movement filled illustrations. You can almost see the teens shaking with fear as they sit waiting and as the protest grows so does the lunch counter in the illustrations. People sit waiting to be acknowledged at a counter curving around the two-page spread and off into the distance. The final counter spans three pages, with one huge difference. This time there’s, “a doughnut and coffee, with cream on the side” for them all. 

A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park

A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park

In 2008, Nya, a young woman who lives in Sudan, walks two hours one way to get water for her family.  She does this twice a day.  She does not have shoes.  In her book A Long Walk to Water,  Newbery medalist Linda Sue Park, introduces us to Nya.  She also introduces us to Salva, a young man living in Sudan in 1985.

Their stories are told in alternating tales.  Salva is a young student in Sudan in 1985.  His country has been going through a civil war for decades.  One day while Salva is at school, a group of rebels attack his village.  The teacher tells all the students to run away to escape the attack by the rebels.  Salva does as instructed but soon finds himself alone and far from his home.  He certainly does not feel safe.  He is lost and disoriented.  He meets up with a group of refugees who are leaving Sudan and heading to Kenya.  Salva joins the group though they are reluctant to accept him because he is a child and may become a burden.    Salva walks with them, hoping to find safety in Kenya and hoping to be reunited with his family.

The Atrium Gallery: Gunther Meyer

White Orchid by Gunther Meyer


Works by Gunther Meyer are on display in the Headquarters Atrium Gallery through February.

See selected works below.

 

Dogwood

Dogwood
$95

If you like The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

If you like The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd "explores a young girl's search for the truth about her mother; her courage to tear down racial barriers; and her joy as she claims her place within a community of women." If you like The Secret Life of Bees, you may also like these suggestions:

Bean TreesThe Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
"Feisty Marietta Greer changes her name to "Taylor'' when her car runs out of gas in Taylorville, Ill. By the time she reaches Oklahoma, this strong-willed young Kentucky native with a quick tongue and an open mind is catapulted into a surprising new life. Taylor leaves home in a beat-up '55 Volkswagen bug, on her way to nowhere in particular, savoring her freedom. But when a forlorn Cherokee woman drops a baby in Taylor's passenger seat and asks her to take it, she does. (Publishers Weekly)

 

CloverClover by Dori Sanders
"After her father dies within hours of being married to a white woman, a ten-year-old black girl learns with her new mother to overcome grief and to adjust to a new place in their rural black South Carolina community."
(Catalog Summary)


 

Wine & Cheese Reception and "The Mystery of Picasso" on 2/22

The Mystery of Picasso

6-7pm: Wine & Cheese Reception hosted by the Fredericksburg Sister City Association
7-8:30pm: Film, "The Mystery of Picasso"

Don't miss our screening of "The Mystery of Picasso" on Tuesday, February 22 at 7pm, Headquarters Library theater.

The Fredericksburg Sister City Association will be hosting a pre-movie Wine & Cheese reception beginning at 6pm. If you are interesting in finding out more about the Fredericksburg Sister City Association and our ties with Fréjus, France, be sure to stop by. Bring a friend or two!

The Mystery of Picasso
(Suitable for high school through adult, 75 min)
An exploration of the mind and motivations of Picasso, as he creates works live, in this exposé of a master at work. One of the greatest art documentaries ever made captures the exhilarating moment and mystery of creativity of the 20th century's greatest artist Pablo Picasso. French film director Georges Clouzot (Diabolique, Wages of Fear) persuaded his friend Picasso to perform his drawing and painting on glass while filmed from other side. The master creates 20 mesmerizing works. Casual comments between the two prove fascinating. In French with easy-to-read English subtitles.

Join us every month for great Art Films on the big screen.

The Greatest Skating Race: A World War II Story from the Netherlands

The Greatest Skating Race: A World War II Story from the Netherlands

It is 1941, and the German Army occupies The Netherlands.  A young Dutch boy named Piet has been given the task of escorting two neighborhood children to safety in Brussels.  The Greatest Skating Race: A World War II Story from the Netherlands, by Louise Borden, is the exciting story of Piet Janssen.  He live in the town of Sluis in the Netherlands.  His town is on the border between The Netherlands and Brussels.  During the winters there, it is so cold that the canals freeze and the ice is thick enough to skate on.  In fact, skating is a form of transportation for many people in the Netherlands.

Piet loves to skate.  He also idolizes a skater named Pim Mulier who once skated through eleven towns.  Many Dutch have skated through towns, but the route that Pim took has its own name, the Elfstedentocht (the Eleven Towns Race).  Piet has been training to duplicate this race and finish just like his idol Pim Mulier.  But in December of 1941, many of the Dutch were concerned with much more than a race along the canals.  Their country was occupied by Germany.  Because of the war, many fathers were gone.  They had joined the Allied forces in England.