LibraryPoint Blog

12/08/2014 - 11:43am
Blackbird: A Childhood Lost and Found by Jennifer Lauck

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Blackbird: A Childhood Lost and Found by Jennifer Lauck: "Lauck's heartbreaking and inspiring memoir...tells how an ordinary child growing up under the blue skies of Carson City, Nevada, in the early 1970s lost her childhood after her world became unhinged by family tragedy." (Book Summary)

If you enjoyed this book for the author's engaging writing, you may enjoy these titles:
 

Change Me Into Zeus's Daughter by Barbara Robinette Moss

"With an unflinching voice, Barbara Robinette Moss chronicles her family's chaotic, impoverished survival in the red-clay hills of Alabama. A wild-eyed, alcoholic father and a humble, heroic mother along with a shanty full of rambunctious brothers and sisters fill her life to the brim with stories that are gripping, tender, and funny." (Amazon.com)

 

Driving with Dead People: A Memoir by Monica Holloway

"Holloway's candid story starts out innocently enough as she describes her eccentric family, especially her father, who loved "talking gore" and kept a movie camera in his pick-up for filming gruesome wrecks. Monica, too, has an obsession with death, and revels in her friendship with a mortician's daughter and their access to postmortems. When Monica reaches her teen years, her parents divorce. Her mother then decides it's "her turn," and she goes back to college, often leaving Monica and her next oldest sister alone. Holloway perceptively writes about hurtful moments embedded in her memory, such as her parents repeatedly telling her that her birth was a "mistake," and her mother's selfish refusal to pay for treatment for a kidney infection. The final piece of this dysfunctional family's puzzle falls into place when the oldest sister begins to remember being molested by their father; so, too, does Monica. Amidst a burgeoning number of abuse memoirs, Holloway's shines because of her deft handling of the small details while painstakingly assembling the larger picture." (Booklist)

12/08/2014 - 3:48pm
To Dare Mighty Things: The Life of Theodore Roosevelt by Doreen Rappaport

To Dare Mighty Things, by Doreen Rappaport, brings Theodore Roosevelt to rough-riding, "Bully!"-shouting life, showing what made America's 26th president such a captivating figure.

12/04/2014 - 9:55am
Holiday Fun

The holidays are a busy time, and the CRRL can help! Attend a card, wrapping paper or gift-making workshop to prepare for any celebration. It’s also a great time to connect with the community, and our holiday open houses are just the place. Want to take a moment, catch your breath and spend some quality time with your children before the big event? Join us for one of our specially themed children’s workshops. Don’t forget we also offer a wide selection of books, music, and DVDs for every winter holiday, along with books full of recipes and DIY craft and gift ideas.

 

12/08/2014 - 4:23pm
The Beats: A Graphic History by Harvey Pekar and Ed Piskor

“...the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.” - Jack Kerouac's On the Road 

The Beats: A Graphic History tackles the generation of post-World War II writers who revealed an untold side of America while pushing censors' boundaries with their writing style.

12/02/2014 - 11:31am
Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man by Fannie Flagg

With a mother who tries to be prim and proper and a daddy who dreams big but has sorrowful, often hilarious runs of bad luck trying to make his way in the world, young Daisy Fay—with a chipped front tooth, brave heart, and clever mind—finds the 1950s a spectacularly exciting time to come of age. As in her other best-selling novel, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café, Fannie Flagg’s Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man overlays its sometimes somber situations with such absurdities as to have readers laughing out loud.

12/08/2014 - 12:52pm
12 Gifts from the CRRL in 2014

2014 was a great year for learning and discovery at your library. 

1. The TARDIS
Doctor Who’s iconic time machine has transported our customers through time and space at several library branches.

2. eBooks, eAudio, eMagazines
We have been steadily growing our OverDrive, OneClickdigital, Freading, and Zinio collections for your downloading enjoyment.

3. Stafford 350
The library continues to celebrate Stafford County’s 350th anniversary with such special activities as Stafford Trailblazers, Geocaching, and a Tagwhat history app.

4. Beyond Facebook & Twitter: Pinterest & Instagram
We’ve expanded our social media presence to include Pinterest and Instagram, offering great content for book lovers!

12/10/2014 - 2:10pm
King Dork Approximately by Frank Portman

Tom Henderson is back for a new semester at a new school in King Dork Approximately. In the previous book, his father's encoded copy of Catcher in the Rye inadvertently led to a takedown of Hillmont High's creepy principal and earned Tom a severe head injury in the process. 

11/26/2014 - 8:12am
The Girl Next Door by Ruth Rendell

Looking for a mystery with great characters and a story that will keep you on the edge of your seat? Read The Girl Next Door, by Ruth Rendell.

Six decades after World War II, construction workers uncover a tin box containing two skeletal hands. The ensuing police investigation leads to the reunion of six friends who decades before had lived and played in the neighborhood where the hands were found. Old friends will reunite, a marriage will break up, and a past crime will be solved.

11/25/2014 - 1:59pm
The Family Cooks by Laurie David

My niece is a tactile learner and uses touch to explore her world. That doesn’t work so well in an art museum or when there’s an unknown sticky substance nearby, but it’s ideal for cooking! She especially enjoys stirring, whisking and manning the salad spinner. Her enthusiasm can be challenging for adults trying to “get things done” but she pitches in whenever possible. This year, engage children in the holiday cooking and they will feel proud to have part in the celebration. You can also share your family’s culinary creations with the community by using #crrlfallfood on your favorite social media sites, including Facebook and Pinterest. Here are some cookbooks to inspire and help make cooking as a family easy and fun!

11/25/2014 - 8:54am
This House of Sky: Landscapes of a Western Mind by Ivan Doig

Ivan Doig’s This House of Sky is a memoir set in the rugged, sheep-raising terrain of Montana. It was a time when the last of the small-town ranchers were on their way out, pushed along by the Great Depression and rich men buying up failed farms to add to their own.

The author’s people were not of the rich kind. They were scrappy, immigrant stock. Ivan’s grandfather came with family from Scotland. They ran sheep til their luck ran out. Then they worked for the big ranchers.  Ivan’s father was a little guy, but he broke broncos—sometimes breaking his own bones doing it -- rode herd on sheep, bossed the other hands, and fell in love with a 16-year-old girl.

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