LibraryPoint Blog

Find out about library events and services, books and authors in the news, and more.

Beastly by Alexandra Flinn

Beastly by Alexandra Flinn

In Beastly, by Alexandra Flinn, Kyle Kingsbury is the kind of guy who has it all--looks, money, and charm. At his exclusive NYC prep school, of course he's going to be voted homecoming prince. It's a joke that anybody else even has his name on the ballot. Speaking of jokes, there's some new, chubby girl dressed in Goth black who's spent a lot of the morning glaring at him. She even called him beastly. How dare she?

Big Library Read: Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth

Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth

Beginning today, we'll be participating in OverDrive's second Big Library Read featuring Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth by Jane O’Connor. The first Big Library Read this past May featured Michael Malone's The Four Corners of the Sky.

From September 16-30, Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth will be available for download in both eBook and audiobook formats on our OverDrive site. During this two-week reading period, Book 1 from the Nancy Clancy series will be available for every customer who wishes to read it—no holds, no waitlists. All you need is your barcode and pin!

An Online Survey for the Disabled... and Those Who Love and Care for Them

A smiling woman in a wheelchair with her mother
It's that time of year again...the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities wants to hear from you! If you are a person with a disability, a family member, a concerned citizen, a care provider, or a policymaker, they need your help.

Their annual Consumer Satisfaction & Stakeholder Feedback Survey tells them (and their funding authorities) how they're doing, so please take 10-15 minutes to complete the online survey. The survey will close September 30, so why wait? If you need assistance call 804.786.0016 and someone can help you. http://www.vbpdvoice.com

Dreamer, Inspired by a True Story

Dreamer, Inspired by a True Story

Dreamer, Inspired by a True Story, is one of those uplifting horse films that is good for the whole family. It features a stellar cast. Ben Crane (Kurt Russell) is the dad who barely makes a living training other people’s--rich people’s--horses. Kris Kristofferson plays his father, a gruff man who lost almost all the family’s land along with their money and their stock during his hard times as a racehorse owner. Father and son are shy with each other, bitter, and stubborn. The lightness comes from young Cale Crane (Dakota Fanning) who, without being cloyingly sweet, wants to follow in her family’s footsteps, much against her father’s wishes.

Hartwood Days and Hartwood History

Beyond the 95 Corridor

Drive out Route 17 north from Falmouth, past the strip malls, the shopping centers and the subdivisions, and you’ll find that as the roadside gets less crowded, the scenery becomes more historic. In the 18th century, this corridor was more a place for pioneers than for fancy plantation owners, though there were a few of those, too. According to the book They Called Stafford Home, the oldest houses were mainly hewn of logs and did not survive into modern times. Between the natural aging process and the devastating Federal occupation during the Civil War, the Hartwood area saw and suffered through a lot of important history. It would take determined efforts in the late 20th century and beyond to preserve its place in the past and present it to future generations.

STEM in the Library

If you're the caregiver for a school age child, then STEM is probably already a household word. An acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, STEM is a focused initiative in the nation's schools and ties in closely with the library's educational mission. Its origins lie with Congress’ America Competes Act, aptly named because when it comes to these subject areas, the consensus has been that our students are not prepared to do the STEM-related jobs we will need filled in the near future. 

Help with the Affordable Care Act @ the Library

Woman using a laptop

Learn how the new federal health care law affects you at HealthCare.gov, the official site of the Health Insurance Marketplace. Created under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Health Insurance Marketplace is designed to help you find health coverage that fits your budget and meets your needs.

Open enrollment for health insurance begins on October 1, 2013, with coverage starting as soon as January 1, 2014. With one simple application, you can compare all the plans available to you and check whether you qualify for free or low-cost coverage. You may enroll online, by mail, or in person. To apply and enroll online, or to print an application form to mail in, visit HealthCare.gov. Telephone assistance is available 24/7 to help you complete your application. Call 1-800-318-2596.  For in-person assistance, your librarian can refer you to the Health Insurance Marketplace Navigator and Certified Application Counselors for your locale.

If you like Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn: "On the morning of his fifth wedding anniversary, Nick's wife Amy suddenly disappears. The police immediately suspect Nick. Amy's friends reveal that she was afraid of him, that she kept secrets from him. He swears it isn't true. A police examination of his computer shows strange searches. He says they aren't his. And then there are the persistent calls on his mobile phone. So what really did happen to Nick's beautiful wife?"
 
If you enjoyed this title, here are some other titles you may like:
 
Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson
An amnesiac attempts to reconstruct her past by keeping a journal and discovers the dangerous inconsistencies in the stories of her husband and her secret doctor. (catalog description)
 
 
 
 
 
By Blood by Ellen Ullman
San Francisco in the 1970s. Free love has given way to radical feminism, psychedelic ecstasy to hard-edged gloom. The Zodiac Killer stalks the streets. A disgraced professor takes an office in a downtown tower to plot his return. But the walls are thin and he's distracted by voices from next door--his neighbor is a psychologist, and one of her patients dislikes the hum of the white-noise machine. And so he begins to hear about the patient's troubles with her female lover, her conflicts with her adoptive WASP family, and her quest to track down her birth mother. The professor is not just absorbed but enraptured. (catalog description)
 

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps by Mordicai Gerstein

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 2

Plant sunflowers on the Moon? What a great idea! Now, how can we get there? Why, a bicycle of course!

Have you ever looked at the Moon and thought it looked sad? It’s all by its lonesome and nothing lives there. For one young boy his sole mission is to cheer up the Moon. How does he plan to cheer up the moon? By planting sunflowers! In the picture book How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps, author Mordicai Gerstein has laid out a plan for anyone to follow to reach the Moon. NASA hasn’t even thought of it! All you will need is a bicycle, a huge slingshot, an extremely long garden hose, and a spacesuit, size extra small, from NASA. Sounds easy, right? Have you gotten permission from your parents? Uh, oh, that could be the most difficult part of this brilliant plan.

What's Your Take on Cassavetes? Four Films

Faces by John Cassavetes

For someone who loves independent movies, it sure took me a heck of a long time to watch anything directed by John Cassavetes.

Maybe that is because I had heard how emotionally intense his films were, tapping into a vein of real life and forgoing any sense of escapism that most movies offer. Despite that hesitation, I am deeply satisfied that I took the time to watch four great films by this stalwart of early independent film, who took many menial acting jobs so he could make something great.

Shadows, Cassevetes' first film, is a defiant statement against mainstream culture, both in terms of cinema and society. It follows three African American siblings living in New York City, two of whom are trying to pass as white. The film was shot without a script, and its black and white, 16-millimeter film stock lacks the gloss of Hollywood pictures of the same year (North by Northwest or Ben-Hur for example). With its jazz score by Charles Mingus and its focus on urban youth in 1950's, Shadows is a must see for any fans of Beat writers or early independent film.