LibraryPoint Blog

10/20/2016 - 2:59pm

Now that I have a young child, I’ve become more aware of how short her attention span is. I know that I can have one, maybe two short books in a row before her attention wanders away, and she wants to do something else (which also explains why we love songs and playing so much in our Grow a Reader classes). Since making this discovery, I’ve been on the hunt for some books that are short and colorful that she’ll enjoy and ones I’m enthusiastic about reading to her. So, I’ve gathered together a list of shorter picture books that make her giggle, coo, and generally pay attention.  

10/31/2016 - 9:04am

The period of time from the late 1930s to the end of the 1950s is commonly known as the "Golden Age" of science fiction.  The Golden Age was noted for the volume of science fiction produced due to the large number of science fiction-oriented pulp magazines and the depth of the creative talent involved.  Many of the writers working in this period established concepts that would have a tremendous cultural impact on their readers. Many ideas integral to modern science fiction frequently originated in this period. Two of the writers responsible for such ideas were A.E. Van Vogt and E.E. "Doc" Smith.

10/14/2016 - 12:38am
A History of Classic Monsters: Creature from the Black Lagoon

To date, humans have explored less than 5% of the world’s oceans. Whatever is lying in wait beneath the cavernous dark water is something yet to be discovered. Many scientists speculate that there are creatures such as the giant squid, which live in deep, seemingly endless trenches, hiding in the dark. Can there be other creatures as well—possibly from the Black Lagoon?

In 1941, producer William Alland was attending a dinner party for the classic Citizen Kane, when Mexican cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa told him about a myth that involved a half-fish, half-human creature on the Amazon River. Ten years later, Alland wrote a screenplay dubbed The Sea Monster, partially based on the French fairy tale, Beauty and the Beast. Following the success of the 3D House of Wax in 1953, Jack Arnold was hired to direct the rewrite of Sea Monster which was now Creature from the Black Lagoon.

11/16/2016 - 8:53am
Earn Money for CRRL When You Shop
Did you know that you can earn money for your library when you are shopping at Amazon at no additional cost to you? You can do this with all of your Amazon shopping—not just books.


Through a partnership with Wowbrary, CRRL will receive a percentage of your purchase at Amazon when you start your shopping at this link: www.wowbrary.org/rap

10/13/2016 - 10:31am
The Next Big Library Read is Here!

From October 13-28, OverDrive's Big Library Read is back with the eBook and audiobook format of This Is Where It Ends, by Marieke Nijkamp.

This Is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp
Minutes after the principal of Opportunity High School in Alabama finishes her speech welcoming the student body to a new semester, she discovers that the auditorium doors will not open, and someone starts shooting a gun as four teens, each with a personal reason to fear the shooter, tell the tale from separate perspectives.

In Nijkamp's story, the message she shares is even more poignant today than ever, due to campus attacks and other mass shooting around the United States. The subject of gun violence is treated realistically, increasing awareness of the problem for both adults and teens.

During the Big Library Read, the digital version of this book will be available to all library customers to download for free. This is Where it Ends can be read on all major computers and devices. Like all of our eBooks, it will automatically expire at the end of the lending period, so there are never any late fees.

In addition to having a message board where readers can communicate with each other, OverDrive will also have a podcast episode where the author will talk with OverDrive's Professional Book Nerds.

10/31/2016 - 9:03am

Over the course of the twentieth century, many authors have emerged to define the popular perception of science fiction. These authors have created some of the most-read science fiction works and continue to have an enormous influence on the science fiction world to this day. It is the work of these authors that has made the genre into a more diverse and critically respected field.

10/28/2016 - 3:31pm
Three for Thanksgiving

Our libraries will be closed on Thanksgiving and the day after, so now's the time to pick up some reading to take you through the holiday. We have many cookbooks to help plan the feast, but of our other collections these three books tell stories especially true to life and true to the heart to help make your holiday a warm one.

11/02/2016 - 10:12am

On Christmas Eve, a young girl dreams her beloved toy comes to life. He becomes her Nutcracker Prince and dances his Clara through the land of sweets and defeats the wicked Mouse King. Perhaps you've seen the ballet-- it's so popular that many ballet schools make it their featured holiday production year after year. The music is amazing—from the wild Russian dance to the slow and mysterious Arabian dance. It all flows together to create a magical night of exhilarating performances.

10/31/2016 - 9:02am

The most famed and prolific area of science fiction is the planetary adventure, featuring strange environments, exotic alien races, and massive battle scenes. Many of the most popular science fiction universes, such as Star Wars, Star Trek, and Avatar, take place in these environments. Most of these universes owe their existence to the adventure fiction of one author.

11/01/2016 - 2:40pm

Have you ever been in a place where there were lots of buildings but no trees? New housing developments or parts of a city that have been neglected for a long time may not have the shady spots and fresh air that trees give. As trees breathe, they let out oxygen that humans and animals need to survive. Their roots hold the ground together, making sure the soil doesn't blow away in the wind. When a tree dies naturally in the forest, its wood becomes a home for insects and a cafeteria for the hungry birds who eat those insects. Trees provide so many good things for the Earth.

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