England -- fiction

The Red Door

By Charles Todd

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In post-World War I England, Scotland Yard detective Ian Rutledge faces a wall of silence as he attempts to bring a ruthless killer to justice for the bludgeoning death of a Lancashire woman and the murder of a man who never came home from the Great War.
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Falconer's Crusade

By Ian Morson

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At Oxford University, in 1624, the savage murder of a young girl kindles a frenzy of suspicion between privileged students and impoverished townspeople. And when one of Falconer's students who may have witnessed the crime narrowly escapes being beaten to death by a lynch mob, the Regent Master rushes to his defense.

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The Light Years

By Elizabeth Jane Howard

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In 1937, the coming war is only a distant cloud on Britain's horizon. As the Cazalet households prepare for their summer pilgrimage to the family estate in Sussex, readers meet Edward, in love with but by no means faithful to his wife Villy; Hugh, wounded in the Great War; Rupert, who worships his lovely child-bride Zoe; and Rachel, the spinster sister.
Its sequel, Marking Time, is set during World War II.

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County Chronicle

By Angela Thirkell

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"Through a choreographed round of fetes, parties, and other occasions, Thirkell introduces a series of intrigues - romantic, literary, and personal - as well as a few intriguing strangers to the country houses and village lanes of Barsetshire."
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Celebrations at Thrush Green

By Miss Read

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Miss Read's 36th novel takes readers back to the village of Thrush Green, where special plans and celebrations are being made for the village school's 100th anniversary celebration. And although plans become complicated, events culminate in a very special celebration.
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The Weaver's Tale: A Medieval Mystery

Wracked with sickness on a frozen day in 1473, Roger the Chapman collapses on the road in the city of Bristol. Strong as he usually was, he had overestimated his ability to lug his pack of goods the many miles in such gruesome weather. Most of the townspeople want to leave him to die—just such a one might be a plague-bearer—but a weaver’s widow and her young daughter decide to shelter him anyway in Kate Sedley’s The Weaver’s Tale.

Margaret Walker and her daughter Lillis were already regarded with suspicion by their neighbors because of the mysterious circumstances surrounding the death of Margaret’s father. The town feels guilty for the part it played in the affair, and they have taken to bullying the Walker women. The bullying is bad now, but it seems to be getting worse—perhaps fatally so. Roger agrees to stay in the Walker cottage for several weeks until winter has passed. He can help them with their chores and perhaps, too, help in solving the mystery surrounding the weaver’s death.

Born Guilty

By Reginald Hill

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Britain's only black, balding, unemployed lathe operator-turned-detective, featured in Blood Sympathy, fights his way through angry cops and crazed drug addicts on the trail of the killer of a boy in a cardboard box.

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The White Rose Murders

By Michael Clynes

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In 1517 the English armies have defeated and killed James IV of Scotland at Flodden and James's widow-queen, Margaret, sister to Henry VIII, has fled to England, leaving her crown under a Council of Regency. Roger Shallot is drawn into a web of mystery and murder by his close friendship with Benjamin Daunbey, the nephew of Cardinal Wolsey, first minister of Henry VIII. Benjamin and Roger are ordered into Margaret's household to resolve certain mysteries as well as to bring about her restoration to Scotland. They begin by questioning Selkirk, a half-mad physician imprisoned in the Tower. He is subsequently found poisoned in a locked chamber guarded by soldiers. The only clue is a poem of riddles. However, the poem contains the seeds for other gruesome murders. The faceless assassin always leaves a white rose, the mark of Les Blancs Sangliers, a secret society plotting the overthrow of the Tudor monarchy.

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The Queen's Man

By Sharon Kay Penman

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Eleanor of Aquitaine sits on England's throne. At seventy, she has outlived the husband with whom she had once scandalized the world. But has she also outlived her favorite, her first-born son? Richard Lionheart, England's king, has been missing these last months. It is rumored that he is dead. Many think his youngest brother plots to steal the crown. Only Eleanor's fierce will can keep John from acting on his greed. Only a letter, spattered with the blood of a dying man murdered on the Winchester road, can tell her if Richard still lives.

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Murder in the Holy City

By Simon Beaufort

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The fate of kings is not always glorious.... Indeed, England's Edward II so angered his wife, her lover, and his subjects when he flaunted his male favorites that they revolted, deposed him, and made him prisoner. History records Edward II was eventually murdered most foully in Berkeley Castle and buried most publicly in Gloucester Cathedral. But was he? The heir, Edward III, charges Chancery Clerk Edmund Beche with uncovering the truth of the matter. Beche's investigation is torturous, blocked by hidden records, outright lies, unexpected confessions, double crosses, and a high body count. Grave-digging, burglary, and soldiering at the bloody battle of Crecy await him. But he's a most determined man....

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