Reading Room Blog

The Forest of Hands and Teeth

Experience a minute in the Forest of Hands and Teeth:

 Heart pounding yet? The Forest of Hands and Teeth, a novel by Carrie Ryan, is about a young woman named Mary and her life in her village. Sounds bucolic, doesn't it? Until you learn that the village is guarded by a high fence, which is surrounded by hordes of mindless, flesh-eating zombies called the Unconsecrated. Mary can hear their moaning all day and night, and she doesn't dare get too close to the fence, for the infection that turns you into an Unconsecrated is passed by a single bite.

Deliciously Creepy Graphic Novels

    What did you read during the Snownami/Snowpalooza/Snowmageddon?  Judging by the armloads of books people were checking out from the library before each of the storms, the most popular items were picture books, mysteries, best sellers, historical fiction, biographies… in fact, people were, as usual, reading everything!


    Among those armloads were plenty of graphic novels for young readers.  Defined as novels with complex storylines told in the form of a comic book, these books are finding increasing recognition in the form of awards.

Great Lives Series: Edgar Allan Poe

"We are not impotent- we pallid stones.
Not all our power is gone- not all our fame-
Not all the magic of our high renown-
Not all the wonder that encircles us-
Not all the mysteries that in us lie-
Not all the memories that hang upon
And cling around about us as a garment,
Clothing us in a robe of more than glory."
---From "The Coliseum" by Edgar Allan Poe

If you like books by Victoria Thompson...

If you like books by Victoria Johnson, you may like these suggestions. Here are some other historical mystery series, most of which can be described as novels of manners, with strong period details, and relationships which grow despite societal class distinctions. Enjoy!

Cordelia Frances Biddle - Martha Beale/Thomas Kelman series

If you like "The Da Vinci Code"...

If you liked The Da Vinci Code because of its thrilling chases and suspense, you may enjoy these titles:

Sandstorm
by James Rollins
“Ubar, a lost city buried beneath the Arabian Desert, is more than mere legend, and something astonishing waits there.”—catalog summary.  This is the first in the Sigma Force series by Rollins.

Stitches:--A Memoir by David Small

Five Scenes from David Small's "Stitches" from Stitches: A Memoir... on Vimeo.

As if David Small's graphic autobiography Stitches:--A Memoir wasn't powerful enough on its own, five scenes have been turned into eleven minutes of heart-wrenching video.  If you've read the novel, is it worth it?  Absolutely.  Hearing 'mama's little cough," slamming of cupboards and moving her "fork a half inch to the right" further enhances the viewers understanding of David Small's traumatic, childhood home.  If you haven't read this book, which was nominated for the 2009 Young People's Literature Award by the National Book Foundation, place a hold today!  It's worth enjoying in all formats! 

2 Book Sales Starting Friday, February 19

Find romance (and great bargains) at two library book sales beginning this Friday, February 19. Stop by the Headquarters Atrium for our annual Romance book sale. You'll also find Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Mystery, children's books, DVDs, and more!

Also on Friday, Salem Church branch will hold its monthly lobby book sale. Both sales run through Thursday, February 25. Shop one or both! See more upcoming book sale dates.

American Life in Poetry: Column 256


BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

A poem is an experience like any other, and we can learn as much or more about, say, an apple from a poem about an apple as from the apple itself. Since I was a boy, I’ve been picking up things, but I’ve never found a turtle shell until I found one in this poem by Jeff Worley, who lives in Kentucky.

 

On Finding a Turtle Shell in Daniel Boone National Forest

A History of Classic Science Fiction: A.E. Van Vogt and E.E. "Doc" Smith

The period of time from the late 1930s to the end of the 1950s is commonly known as the "Golden Age" of science fiction.  The Golden Age was noted for the volume of science fiction produced due to the large number of science fiction-oriented pulp magazines and the depth of the creative talent involved.  Many of the writers working in this period established concepts that would have a tremendous cultural impact on their readers.